Tips for Motivation: Unmissable Advice from 193 Experts

As published on https://www.thoughtfulgrowth.com/tips-for-motivation/.

Tips for Motivation: Unmissable Advice from 193 Experts

by Stephen Roe Last updated March 10, 2017

Do you struggle with motivation?

When faced with a large task, do you find it difficult to keep going—or even start?

If so, you’re not alone. Even the highest achievers struggle, but they have techniques, tricks, and tips for motivation that you haven’t put into practice.

Following their advice could change your motivation—and your life.

I asked experts from a broad range of fields how they stay motivated. Specifically, I asked this question:

What 3 tips for motivation do you use when you feel lazy?

The responses were overwhelming: 192 high achievers from a dozen fields chimed in with their advice, opinions, and tips.

Experts explained how they often struggle, how their work motivates them, and the practical (and sometimes crazy!) strategies they use when all else fails.

It’d be impossible to list every strategy, but five of the top tips were:

  1. Ask yourself if you should be doing this task at all
  2. Start with something tiny
  3. Get moving
  4. Take a break
  5. Build a motivation library

If you want to learn how to build your motivation, why not learn from the best?

The best tips for motivation

 

This guide is huge, and the quotes are epic. The only problem? Finding how to apply the best ones.

While compiling this post, I highlighted the most practical strategies I could use right away. I put them into a simple, free email course I call Mastering Motivation.

If you can spare 2-3 minutes a day for the next five days, you can implement each one. It’ll skyrocket your motivation. I promise.

Get the 5 best tips for free

Without further ado, the experts!

(Participants are listed by category in alphabetical order. Some contributors have expertise in multiple categories, and are listed more than once. Click on the category title or name to jump to a section.)

 

Career & Leadership

 

Blogging

 

Digital Marketing

 

Entrepreneurship

 

Finance

 

Fitness

 

Lifestyle & How-To

 

Nutrition

 

Personal Development

 

Psychology & Productivity

 

Social Media & SEO

 

Writing

 

Career & Leadership

Mark Babbitt

 

Switch and Shift

Mark Babbitt is a speaker, author and blogger who serves as CEO and Founder of YouTern, a social community for college students, recent graduates and young professionals that Mashable calls a “Top 5 Online Community for Starting Your Career.” He is also President of Switch and Shift and CMO and co-founder of ForwardHeroes.org. Mark is the father of five and a grandfather; he and the woman who tolerates him (barely) call Seattle, Washington home.

 

Chances are, because you’re reading this on Thoughtful Growth, you’re an overachiever. You are nearly always moving toward achieving a goal, maybe many goals. So, do yourself a favor, at least for a short time: embrace the lazy.

For chronic over-achievers, a short-term feeling of laziness is nature’s way of saying, “Slow it down. Time to refresh.” So do that! Put Rocky or another inspiring movie up on Netflix, then sit on your butt and watch. Grab your favorite Pandora station, close your eyes, and listen; really listen. Or go for a walk or hike that reminds you why you live where you live.

Embrace the lazy, my ambitious friends… because burn-out almost never leads to positive results.

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Peter Banerjea

 

SuccessIsWhat

Peter Banerjea is co-founder of SuccessIsWhat, a blog on productivity and leadership. He has coached several entrepreneurs and leaders from Fortune 500 companies to become more productive and achieve their goals faster. Peter is also the author of the free ebook Productivity Secrets of 7 Billionaires You Can Put into Action Right Now.

 

Here are three things that work wonders for me

1. Getting Physical

Our bodies have an astonishing influence on our mood. Addressing our physical state is the easiest way to pump up our motivation. Doing a few pushups or a practicing a quick round of shadow boxing gives me a rush of adrenaline and increases my aggression levels – and hence my motivation.

2. Power Song

Music has the power to magically lift your mood. Think ‘Rocky’ or ‘Superman’ soundtracks or anything else that gets you moving. Personally I love Bon Jovi’s ‘It’s my life’. I either listen to it or sing it aloud.

3. Borrow some Energy

I know that motivation is contagious. It’s tough to feel down when you are speaking to someone who has really high levels of energy. I just pick up the phone and call a friend or colleague who’s doing really well. 10 minutes of hearing about their success stories is all it takes me to get charged up and get back to work!

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Josh Bersin

 

JoshBersin.com

Josh Bersin founded Bersin in 2001 to provide research and advisory services focused on corporate learning. Josh is a frequent speaker at industry events and has been quoted on talent management topics in key media, including Harvard Business Review, The Wall Street Journal, Bloomberg, on BBC Radio, CBS Radio and National Public Radio.

 

A) Take a walk and get some fresh air. In most cases simply changing the scene, getting some exercise, and seeing the outdoors will give you new ideas, fresh perspective, energy, and some time to focus.

B) Remind yourself that you’re here to help others. While your “work” may sometimes seem difficult and painstaking, the real value of what you do (whether you’re building something, designing something, or delivering services) is “helping others.” If you remember that you are “helping people” and you personalize the fact that each one of them is going to feel better, work better, or deliver better because of your work, you’ll feel a new level of inspiration to do your best.

C) Stop and take time help someone else. Sometimes when you feel stressed, tired, or overworked the best thing to do is just stop. Then take some time to look at the people around you (your team, your peers, your network) – and do something to help someone else. Just taking the time to personally coach someone, offer to help them get their work done, or listen to their challenges and problems – will give you newfound inspiration and motivation to refocus on your own work, project, or task.

D) Think about the beauty of what you do. One final thought. Perhaps the most motivating thing most people can imagine is not just “getting work done” but rather putting some of yourself into your work. Create something beautiful, something long-lasting, and something that people care about. If you think about every little task as an opportunity to create something beautiful and longlasting, you’ll find new levels of energy and inspiration to outperform.

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Farnoosh Brock

 

Prolific Living

Farnoosh Brock is an entrepreneur who believes that true business success lies in the power of your leadership, the effectiveness of your team and authenticity of your relationships. Today, she is a published author, business consultant and executive coach.

 

1. Moving your body. Your mind is a powerful force and more than once in a while, it likes to lie. Your body can get you back into rhythm. Movement can take on any shape or form. For me, it’s hours on my yoga mat. For some, it’s a walk around the block or a run or a stretch or rolling on your exercise ball. There are hundreds of ways you can open, stretch, move and shake your body and the result is unmistakable: Every single time, your mind resets and you will find invigoration and energy.

2. Watching your diet. What did you eat earlier? How much of it did you eat? How fast did you consume it?  How does your body feel about it? As you well know, high sugar diets give you the crash and sustainable high-nutrient food helps you be balanced and hydrated. I won’t say more as Google can take it from here but when it doubt, treat your body with better food in the right quantities.

3. Speaking your thoughts out loud. When we hear what is going on in our mind, we often pause from shock or embarrassment or simple sadness. So go on, speak those negative thoughts and unkind words about yourself outloud. Then ask yourself: Is it true? Often doing just one or two of them will help you come back to reality and you will replace them with better more appropriate thoughts.

(Be sure to check out Farnoosh’s entire blog post on a lack of motivation! 4 Steps to End Your “I Don’t Feel Like It” Syndrome Forever)

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Alexandra Cavoulacos

 

The Muse

Alex Cavoulacos is the co-founder and Chief Operating Officer of The Muse, the most trusted and beloved career destination for Millennials and beyond, helping over 50 million people every year advance in their careers. Alex has spoken on WNYC and at SxSW, and was named one of INC’s 15 Women to Watch in Tech and TIME’s 140 Best Twitter Feeds of 2014. She is a frequent keynote on productivity and entrepreneurship. Prior to founding The Muse, Alex was a management consultant at McKinsey & Company. She graduated from Yale University, and is an alumna of YCombinator. Follow her @acav.

 

When I feel lazy, there are 3 things that work to get me motivated. First, aligning work with energy is a must: I have a list of “lazy work”, aka the kind of work that can be done with the TV on in the background, and is a bit more mindless. Second, I’ll take a break to get out of that mindset if I need to focus, going for a walk or calling a friend before jumping in. Finally, if all else fails, I bribe myself with a reward, such as “when this presentation is done, I’ll get that extra rich hot chocolate from around the corner”.

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Lolly Daskal

 

LollyDaskal.com

Lolly Daskal is the founder of Lead from Within, a successful leadership firm that offers custom made programs in leadership and organizational development. She is recognized as a Top Thought Leader In Business. Lolly is an advisor to Fortune 500 CEOs and boards. She is one of the top executive coaches in the world.

 

When I notice I’m becoming lazy, I monitor my self talk. Sometimes my behavior causes my thoughts and sometimes my thoughts cause my behavior. I must be careful what I say to myself because I am always listening. The mind is very powerful –what you think, you become. I consider what is creating my lack of motivation, and try to resolve it. And then I focus on just a few tasks at a time, rather than allowing myself to be overwhelmed by all the things I have to accomplish.

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Ebong Eka

 

EbongEka.com

Ebong Eka is a certified public accountant, entrepreneur and former professional basketball player in Europe. He is a leadership, entrepreneur and small business expert who regularly appears on MSNBC, Fox News, Fox Business Channel, NBC and CNN. Ebong is also an accomplished TEDx Speaker, motivational speaker, Huffington Post Small Business Blogger and Office Depot Blogger. Ebong is the author of the book, “Start Me Up! – The No-Business-Plan Business Plan,” published by Career Press. Ebong is the Founder of EKAnomics, leadership and business development training company.

 

1. Revisit my goals – the tangible and specific goals…not the the “I want more money goals”.

2. Revisit why I started to begin with and WHO is relying on my to succeed. (Is it ego, family, legacy, bills, etc)

3. Read, review or watch a motivational video that inspires me into action.

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Jen Gresham

 

Everyday Bright

Jennifer Gresham is a coach who helps people achieve extraordinary professional success, without sacrificing their personal lives. She is the author of the popular blog, Everyday Bright.

 

Jen Gresham – career, personal development

1) I make the initial investment small: Usually the problem when I’m feeling lazy is just getting started. So if I don’t feel like cleaning the bathroom, then I tell myself I will only clean the mirror today. That’s small enough of a task it’s hard to resist. Then I usually end up doing a lot more than that, “while I’m there.”

2) I make the consequences dire: Usually I promise to pay someone a significant amount of money if I don’t get something done. That makes them eager to hold me accountable, and I hate to spend money needlessly.

3) I make sure I know what I’m doing: Often, laziness is just a subterfuge for the fact I’m not clear on my next steps. Often, I can overcome laziness with a quick strategy session, getting clear on outcomes and breaking tasks into smaller steps.

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Chris Guillebeau

 

Art of Non-Conformity

Chris Guillebeau writes at the The Art of Non-Conformity and organizes the annualWorld Domination Summit. He’s the author of Born for This,The Happiness of PursuitThe $100 Startup, and The Art of Non-Conformity, and has traveled to every country in the world.

 

Not sure I have three tips … honestly for me I’m very motivated to create. I think the #1 tip for productivity and life in general is to do work you believe in. Everything gets much easier when that’s the case.

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Whitney Johnson

 

WhitneyJohnson.com

Whitney Johnson was recognized as one of the world’s most influential management thinkers in 2015, and was a finalist for the Top thinkers on Talent at the biennial Thinkers50 ceremony in London. She is best known for her work on driving corporate innovation through personal disruption. She is formerly the co-founder of Rose Park Advisors and author of the critically acclaimedDisrupt Yourself: Putting the Power of Disruptive Innovation to Work and Dare, Dream Do.

 

1. Take a break. Go exercise. Take a walk around the block. Sometimes my brain is just tired. A quick break refreshes.

2. Tell myself-just 15 minutes on this. Then I can go on to something else.

3. Get up especially early. If I can get a lot done early in the day — that tends to lick my laziness.

4. Trust myself. Sometimes I am lazy because what I think needs to get done doesn’t really. If I’ll just take a break, it’ll get done.

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Yuri Kruman

 

YuriKruman.com

Yuri Kruman is a trusted career, business and life coach and professional strategist based in New York. As Member of the Forbes Career Council and CEO / Founder of Master The Talk Career Consulting, he has helped clients of all career stages, industries and job markets around the world (and all around the U.S.) to chart a clear path on their careers, building confidence and understanding along the way.

 

1) Write down 10 ideas for small projects you want to work on in the next 12 months. Ideation + writing make these projects real in your mind and spur it to research, plan and create right away.

2) Start and integrate a small, easily replicable habit into your routine that will tangibly increase your productivity, creativity and output.

3) Start a new challenge for yourself to get fitter, better as a person or faster at a process, even if it’s just for a week or month. Implement immediately.

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Adrian Granzella Larssen

 

The Muse

Adrian Granzella Larssen is the editor-in-chief and first official employee of The Muse—the career and job search platform that’s helped more than 50 million people find and succeed at their dream jobs. In the past five years, she has recruited a team of 600+ freelance writers, garnered awards such as Forbes Top 100 Sites for Women and Top 75 Sites for Your Career, and been featured as a career expert on Forbes, Money, Inc., Real Simple, and Fox TV.

 

– I do the tiniest possible thing to get started. For example, if I’m trying to write an article, it could be writing one sentence, or even opening a Word doc. Sometimes, even that tiny action step is enough momentum to get the real work started.

– I talk to a friend or co-worker about what I’m struggling with. Sometimes they’ll have an idea I hadn’t thought of that’ll make me more excited to get started. On one extreme day, a co-worker and I actually switched tasks that we were dreading-we called it the “work swap”-and we made so much more progress on both than we would have made trying to get motivated alone!

 

– If all else fails, I get outside or spend a few hours on something I actually enjoy, then come back later that day or the next morning and knock everything out when I have fresh eyes and a fresh perspective. Sometimes, a lack of motivation is a sign that our brains need a break!

 

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Kate Matsudaira

 

Ink and Volt

Kate Matsudaira is an experienced VP & CTO with a passion for large scale web systems and startups. She has extensive experience as a hands-on programmer with a strong interest in product. Her greatest asset is my ability to build great teams and execute quickly and efficiently on business goals. She is also a keynote speaker and has spoken at conferences all over the world on distributed systems, scaling, technology leadership, and entrepreneurship. She spends her days running the branding firm Urban Influence and operating the ecommerce website inkandvolt.com.

 

Here are my strategies for making progress, even when I am feeling unmotivated and uninspired:

  1. Take a walk. Sometimes just changing the scenery can moving around can get the creative juices flowing. And if the weather is bad and I can’t get outside, I will do mindless chores like the dishes or vacuum. That way I am taking my mind off the problem but still processing it in the background.
  2. Set a timer. If I set aside time to work on a task then I work on that task – even if I don’t feel like it. I make bargains with myself to just “write for 10 minutes” and set a timer. If I still don’t feel like writing after the timer goes off then I let myself move onto something else. However a lot of the time once I get into the groove I find it easier to just keep going!
  3. Break things down. One pattern I have is that when something is really big or hard I put it off – so in those cases I try to break the problem down to its smallest piece. For example, what can I search on Google to get started? Or what question can I ask someone about this issue to get me moving?

 

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Jeanne C. Meister

 

Future Workplace

Jeanne is a Partner in Future Workplace, an HR Executive Network and research firm dedicated to the future of learning and working. Jeanne is the receipt of the Distinguished Contribution in Workplace Learning Award, an award given by Association For Talent Development to one executive each year honoring their body of work. She is also a Contributor to Forbes Magazine and her column can be found here:http://blogs.forbes.com/jeannemeister/. Jeanne is the co-author of the best selling book, The 2020 Workplace: How Innovative Companies Attract, Develop & Keep Tomorrow’s Employees Today. Jeanne’s newest book, The Future Workplace Experience: 10 Rules For Mastering Disruption in Recruiting and Engaging Employees will be published in November 4, 2016. Glassdoor named Jeanne to the top 50 Influencers in Corporate Human Resources and Recruiting.

 

As I was writing the book, The Future Workplace Experience: 10 Rules For Mastering Disruption in Recruiting and Engaging Employees I had to motivate myself to complete the book while running our business, Future Workplace.

Here is what I did:

1) Set weekly team calls for agree on deliverables for both book chapters and business goals. After all, it takes a village or team in my case to accomplish big goals.

2) Adhere to a daily exercise routine to take care of myself and my wellbeing.

3) Spend quiet time at the end of each day to think about what I was thankful for and where I needed to focus the next day!

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Margaret Molloy

 

Siegel+Gale

Margaret Molloy is the global chief marketing officer at Siegel+Gale, a renowned strategic branding and design firm, where she is a member of the executive leadership. She oversees new business/sales and marketing. A respected thought leader, she has been published in HBR, Forbes, Fast Company and beyond. She is one of the world’s most connected and prominent CMOs.

 

Here are 3 questions I ask myself :

*Is this initiative an essential Priority ?

*How can I be Unstoppable?

*What Relationships can I leverage to achieve success?

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Shawn Murphy

 

Switch and Shift

Shawn Murphy is the CEO and Founder of Switch & Shift, a boutique consultancy and advisory firm dedicated to developing and advancing positive organizational business and leadership practices. Shawn’s debut book, The Optimistic Workplace: Creating an Environment that Energizes Everyone, shares path-breaking beliefs and simple techniques to help leaders at all levels positively shift how people not only perform but how they feel while at work. You can also read Shawn’s weekly column, “Positive Business,” on Inc.com.

 

 

  1. I’m guided by purpose. I use my purpose to help me make personal and professional decisions. It’s the swift kick in the but I need to be reminded why I’m here.
  2. I use the app Freedom to block my access to the internet. This helps prevent me from procrastinating from doing meaningful work.
  3. When I work from home, I schedule my work around my natural energy levels. I’m a morning person. So, that’s when I do my most demanding work.

 

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Kimberly Palmer

 

Kimberly-Palmer.com

Kimberly Palmer is the author of Smart Mom, Rich Mom: How to Build Wealth While Raising a Family, a money/career guide for moms. Previously, she wrote two books,The Economy of You: Discover Your Inner Entrepreneur and Recession-Proof Your Life, and Generation Earn: The Young Professional’s Guide to Spending, Investing, and Giving Back.

 

1. I go running, which always makes me feel more motivate to tackle hard things.

2. I drink a giant cup of coffee.

3. I make lists about the things I need to do and prioritize them and think about what I can cut.

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Darian Parker

 

Parker Academics

Dr. Darian Marcel Parker graduated from Yale University with his PhD, M.Phil and MA in anthropology, and with Highest Honors from UCLA’s College of Honors with degrees in American literature and anthropology. He is the Founder & CEO of Parker Academics, a company that specializes in test prep and academic subjects tutoring. Informing the philosophy and structure of the company is Dr. Parker’s work in the fields of psychological anthropology and education. Dr. Parker is the author of Sartre and No Child Left Behind: An Existential Psychoanalytic Anthropology of Urban Schooling (Rowman & Littlefield Press, 2015).

 

Many times laziness is not a lack of energy, but a signal telling us that there is something unpleasant that we don’t want to confront at the moment. So, when I feel lazy, I simply ask myself, “What do I think is going to be so unpleasant about this experience?” After a little reflection, I can usually find the energy to be productive, reassuring myself of the rewards on the other side.

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Joel Peterson

 

Peterson Partners

Joel Peterson is the Chairman of JetBlue Airways and Founding Partner and Chairman of Peterson Partners. Joel has a long history of successful growth capital investments in a variety of industries. He currently teaches Entrepreneurial Management at Stanford’s Graduate School of Business and serves as a Director of Franklin Covey. Joel is the author of The 10 Laws of Trust: Building the Bonds that make a Business Great. He served formerly as Managing Partner of Trammell Crow Company. He holds an MBA from Harvard Business School.

 

1. Commit to others who you will not let down.

2. Remember you’re building a brand, a legacy that will follow you.

3. Know that you’re needed and can make a difference.

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Skip Prichard

 

SkipPrichard.com

Skip Prichard is CEO and blogger at www.skipprichard.com, an inspirational site designed to help you become a better leader. He serves as President & CEO of OCLC, a global nonprofit computer library service and research organization.

 

1. Fire up your purpose. It’s the why behind our work that gets us going. If I’m ever stalled, I think about the purpose behind the activity and goal. That why is what keeps you going when it’s tough. Often I find that if the why isn’t powerful enough then no amount of motivational tactics will turn it around.

2. Turn up the music. One of the fastest ways to change your state is music. Keep a playlist ready to counter your mood. Go ahead and move a little, too. It will change your mindset.

3. Take a little step in the right direction. Whatever the project, just get started. Don’t think about writing a book. Write a paragraph. Overwhelmed with a 2 hour workout? Just focus on getting to the gym. Take the next incremental step forward and you often end up where you wanted to go.

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Don Purdum

 

Unveil the Web

Don Purdum is the Founder and owner of UnveiltheWeb.com and is an award winning blogger, author, speaker, business consultant and business coach. Don helps businesses discover their message by helping them identify the problems they solve, who they solve them for and how their products or services are part of the solution.

 

Motivation comes pretty simple to me as an optimist who isn’t naturally lazy. However, when I’m not in the “mood” here are my 3 motivational tips:

1. I remember those who I’ve worked with or who have thanked me for helping their business make the jump to the next level. There isn’t anything more satisfying to me!

2. I think about all the opportunities I would miss if I didn’t push through. It’s like going to the gym. I go 4 days per week and sometimes I have to remind myself that results are tied to activity.

3. I pick up the phone and I call my mentors. They remind me of why I do what I do and they inspire me with new ideas, thoughts and actionable items that get me excited.

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Rhiannon Rees

 

RhiannonR.com

Rhiannon Rees is renowned as one of the world’s best self-development experts, referred to as Australia’s answer to US self-help guru Dr. Wayne Dyer. The best-selling success of her first book, “How to Climb Mount Everest in Sandals – The courage to live an ordinary life”, (the startling tale of her own life-journey) has lead to the imminent release of her second book, out in 2015.

Renowned as one the world’s best self development experts, and ranked 4th Best Business Coach in the World 2010, Rhiannon has worked with stars including the Spice Girls, X-Files and Grey’s Anatomy and Private Practice cast members. She is the author of the bestseller How to Climb Mount Everest in Sandals.

 

Daily Consciousness.

Belief

Routine.

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Stever Robbins

 

SteverRobbins.com

Stever Robbins helps people create extraordinary lives and careers through online workshops and one-on-one coaching in career planning, entrepreneurship, and life mastery. He is a co-founder of 3 companies, co-designer of the Harvard Business School Foundations program, and graduate of HBS and MIT. You can find him on the web at http://SteverRobbins.com

 

1. Take a break. We’re not built to go at peak productivity 100% of the time. Sometimes laziness is our unconscious mind’s sign that we need to back off and give ourselves some downtime. It’s often during that downtime that we actually come up with new, creative ideas.

2. Re-connect to my life purpose. Yeah, it sounds hokey. But at the end of the day, every action I am taking (or “should” take) is connected to a project which is connected to some life goal or something that’s important. I ask myself “why is this important?” several times until my answer ends up being something that’s connected to my highest level motivations. If I can’t find the connection, it may mean that the laziness is a signal that I’m doing something that should best be left undone.

3. Engage other people. Our brains treat obligations to others differently than we treat obligations to ourselves. One of my favorite group accountability projects is called a Do-it Day (http://doitdays.com) where we use personal connection to stay engaged and focused over the course of a work day.

Stever Robbins

host of The Get-it-Done Guy’s Quick and Dirty Tips to Work Less and Do More

Podcast: http://steverrobbins.com/thoughtfulgrowth

“Life map” chapter of my book (free): tweet THOUGHTFUL to 33444 for my book chapter about connecting your highest-level motivations to your daily activities.

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Penelope Trunk

 

PenelopeTrunk.com

Penelope Trunk has founded four startups, including Brazen Careerist and Quistic, and writes about career and life at PenelopeTrunk.com. She also researches prolifically, lives on a farm, and homeschools her sons.

 

I tell myself that people are never lazy – they are unmotivated and everyone is a go-getter when its something they care about. When I don’t want to do something I ask myself why. What makes me not take action? Because I should probably not have it on my to do list.

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Blogging

Harsh Agrawal

 

ShoutMeLoud

Harsh Agrawal is an award-winning professional blogger and the founder ShoutMeLoud and Shout University. ShoutMeLoud is one of the most popular international resources on blogging, SEO and internet marketing. When he’s not blogging, Harsh is probably traveling or trying a new kind of adventure sport.

 

 

I read actionable content. Stuff that provokes action or is a case study. Usually, I have found this one trick works best for me.

I start with doing lazy work. Stuff like which require less mental engagement & more action. One important thing to keep in mind is use Pomodoro technique along with this. As you don’t want to end up doing the same work for endless hours.

I Disconnect completely from the internet. Just a Pen, Paper & me. This is when new ideas start popping in. Every month, I have at least one such day when I’m not connected to the internet. This also helps in lower down overall fatigue/burnout.

 

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Mike Allton

 

The Social Media Hat

Mike Allton is a leading Blogging and Social Media Consultant. Mike has developed a reputation for being an excellent teacher and particularly enjoys showing businesses how Content Marketing, the combination of blog content, social media and SEO, can lead to increased website traffic, generation of more leads, and conversion of more sales. Allton is paticularly active on Google+ where he’s known for his mad blogging skills and impressive HootSuite expertise.

 

 

Interestingly, I would seldom say that I feel ‘lazy’ – just sometimes not motivated or directed on what to work on next. To me, lazy means that I just don’t want to do anything, and that’s almost never the case. Instead, it’s a matter of getting excited about working on something or at least deciding what needs to be worked on next and doing it.

Which means my first tip is to always have a To Do list. Perhaps multiple lists. I have a To Do list for my blog ( www.thesocialmediahat.com) for long-term development, as well as one for my primary responsibility, SiteSell (www.sitesell.com). And of course a personal To Do list. That way, whether it’s during the day, evening or weekend, if I’m not sure what I should or could be working on next, I can glance at that list.

My blog content has a kind of To Do list as well – it’s my Evernote notebook that contains all of my blog post ideas and drafts.

Having all of these lists is great for seeing what you can work on next. But having them in front of you also works to my second tip: if there’s no clear priority, work on the task that gets you excited.

Certainly, if something needs to get done today, you need to work on that task. But if you’re a bit more open, then you should skim through your tasks or blog post ideas and allow the most interesting or exciting one to bubble up.

I mentioned my Evernote notebook – this is how I’m able to be so prolific with my blog writing. Instead of sitting down to a blank page, I can skim through all my previous ideas and settle on the one that gets me excited.

Finally, if all else fails, give in! (A little bit.) Allow yourself to take a break now and then. Go for a walk, watch a funny TV show, or read a good book. Allow your tortoise brain as John Cleese calls it to free roam and be creative for a bit. Then get back to work refreshed and re-energized.

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Sarah Arrow

 

Sark eMedia

Sarah Arrow is one of the UK’s leading business bloggers, and has been listed in Forbes three times. She’s the creator of the 30-day Blogging Challenge to get more clients and increase visibility for your business in 30 days.

 

1. Play my motivational list on my iPod. This includes very upbeat songs including “The only way is up” by Yaz, I Feel Better by Gotye, and Safety Dance by Men at Work (you can’t feel unmotivated after Men at Work, it’s not humanly possible) and sing along. There’s something about singing that clears your mind and energises you. If you cannot sing (and I can’t) this might be best done in the car.

2. I start to read the War of Art by Stephen Pressfield. Every page is a kick up the back side that you deserve. Combined with singing this is the best way to raise the spirits and not feel lazy.

3. If I still felt lazy, and I never have got to this third stage as 1 & 2 work so well, I’d go and jump on the trampoline for 20 minutes. Tony Robbins is often heard to say that if you change your physiology you’ll change your state. He also has a mini trampoline.

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Matt Banner

 

On Blast Blog

Matt Banner is the head honcho of On Blast Blog, where he puts proven & practical strategies to the test to help you blast off your blog. Matt has dedicated his life to mastering the craft of starting and growing web based businesses. He’s helped almost 10,000 people now start their own blog and has consulted for Fortune 500 companies to help them get more profitable traffic.

 

Persistence is power!

No pain, no gain.

I also think about my competitors and how they’re working day and night to out hustle me.

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Ryan Biddulph

 

Blogging From Paradise

Ryan Biddulph has traveled the world for over five years. While he travels, he writes at Blogging from Paradise, where he teaches others how to boost their blogging income and generate more traffic. He believes that if you really work at blogging, you can retire to a life of island hopping through smart blogging, as he’s been blessed to do.

 

1: I remember to follow my fun. When I feel lazy I usually moved from following my fun to drudge/busy/low energy work. So I do what makes me feel alive, whether it’s writing a blog post, another eBook, shooting a video or whatever floats my energetic boat at the time. Instant laziness killer.

2: When I feel *really* lazy I jump into an icy cold shower (talk to your doctor first, folks). I learned this from Tony Robbins, Tim Ferriss and Wim Hof, the Iceman. Brilliant way to get my energy flowing, to snap me out of my laziness! I take 2 ice cold showers daily. One of my fave tactics for kick starting my energy and raising my vibe instantly.

3: I take a nap when I feel supremely lazy. Ultimately, laziness is an energetic state where your energy slows down to a snail’s crawl. If I feel totally sapped I know I’ve been trying to use force, not divine Power, to make things happen. Sleeping is a simple way to recharge your body and to boost your energy flow. Either get more sleep each night or if you can steal a few minutes during the day, take a cat nap. Fabulous energizer.

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Kevin Duncan

 

Be A Better Blogger

When he isn’t delivering pearls of wisdom in great roundup posts like this one, Kevin J. Duncan of Be A Better Blogger curates the week’s best hand-picked articles for bloggers and delivers them to inboxes worldwide every weekend.

 

Whether it’s due to laziness, lack of time, or feelings of being overwhelmed; I have one motivational tip – one mantra – I repeat to myself whenever life feels hard: “no more excuses.”

Too little time? Make the time.

Too tired? Everyone is tired. Suck it up.

Too difficult? The level of difficulty to achieve something shouldn’t discourage you – it should reassure you of its worth.

When we stop making excuses for why we can’t do something, our seemingly unobtainable dreams become a little more obtainable. Mountains don’t seem quite as high. Oceans don’t seem quite as deep.

It’s time we stop telling ourselves all the reasons we can’t achieve our goals. It’s time we tell our inner voices of doubt to kindly shut up.

It’s time to get to work.

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Erik Emanuelli

 

ErikEmanuelli.com

Erik Emanuelli has been a professional blogger and freelance writer since 2010. He’s created and published more than 1000 articles on a variety of websites around the web. He has a passion for extreme sports and has practiced bungee jumping, canyoning, rafting, free climbing, diving, snowboarding, and kickboxing. He’s also a travel aficionado and has visited over 30 countries (and counting).

 

– Imagine where you will be one year from now and work hard to realize it.

– Proceed with small steps to achieve big things.

– Get out of your comfort zone.

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Mary Jaksch

 

Write to Done

A-List Blogging

Goodlife Zen

Mary Jaksch is best known for her exceptional training for writers at WritetoDone.com. Grab a copy of her free reportHow to Create an Irresistible Lead Magnet in Less Than 5 Hours. In her “spare” time, Mary’s also the brains behind AlistBlogging.net. and GoodlifeZEN.com, a Zen Master, a mother, and a 5th Degree Black Belt. Join her FREE online training, 5 Powerful Online Writing Strategies.

 

As everyone knows, it’s particularly difficult to rustle up motivation when you feel tired, overwhelmed, or stressed. These are the times when doing something extra beside your everyday tasks, like going for a run, helping others, being creative, or cranking out some more content can feel like it’s just too much.

The key to feeling motivated at such times is to change your mindset. Because, if you feel like grumbling and think you deserve a rest instead of taking up a challenging activity, it will be difficult for you to take action.

What works for me is a two-part strategy. Part #1 is to notice the voices in my head and to end each negative thought with, “…but it’s a privilege!” This puts me into a positive frame of mind. Part #2 is to immediately take a small step toward the action I’m resisting. For example, I might put on running clothes or go to my desk and open my writing software. With this two-part strategy, I can combat flagging motivation, lift my spirits, and take action.

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Zac Johnson

 

ZacJohnson.com

Zac Johnson has been making money online for nearly 20 years now and would love to help you do the same. For that reason, he created his own blog at ZacJohnson.com. With over 1,000 original and real life experience based articles, he walks readers through the ups and downs, and in and outs of affiliate marketing and teaches how others are making money online.

 

1 – Make a Hand-Written List

Each day I flip to a new pad in my notebook and write down a list of things to get done that day. As I accomplish them, I put a big red line through them. This is a great way to keep everything right in front of your face and a reminder to get it done as the day closes out.

2 – Walk My Dog

Sitting at the computer all day sucks! My dog Foxy thinks so too… and she will continually kick the front door or run up stairs to remind me to take her out for a walk. She does this several times throughout the day, so it’s a great way to get away for a bit and refresh.

3 – Play Basketball

I love to play basketball, and I make sure to get in at least 5-10 hours of week playing in the mornings. Working online can be tough, tedious and a killer on the body. Make sure you have some form of staying in shape and doing something you enjoy in the process. Heck, you can even make money blogging on that topic as well!

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Glen Long

 

Smart Blogger

Glen Long is the Managing Editor of Smart Blogger (a.k.a. chief content monkey). When he’s not creating or editing content for the blog or an upcoming course, he’s probably reading or watching Nordic Noir.

 

 

  • Do something requiring little effort (thus indulging your lazy feelings) but is also likely to boost your energy levels. For example: listen to some upbeat music, watch an inspiring TED talk, or read a chapter from a motivational book.
  • Create mini-rewards for task completion that will appeal to your lazy side. For example, you could tell yourself: “Once I’ve completed this blog post, I’ll reward myself with 20 minutes on the couch in front of my favorite Netflix series.”
  • Imagine yourself reaching the end of the day having achieved little of value due to your lazy mood. Mentally amplify any feelings of disappointment and frustration and use them to spur yourself into action.

 

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Matthew Loomis

 

Build Your Own Blog

Matthew “Kaboomis” Loomis has been blogging professionally and for fun since 2005. He put together a total blog building program so that more people can get out of the rat race and find meaningful work they love to do through their own high quality blog.

 

Tip 1: Turn On the Music

Music has a way of reaching deep into our well and pulling out what’s in there. Only you know what type of music works for you. I like to put on my headphones and turn on something that inspires or energizes me.

Tip 2: Check Out Your Competition

When I need some motivation I will go see what others are doing in my niche. That can be a real kick in the pants sometimes and is bound to get you more motivated.

Tips 3: Step Away from Work and Go Do Something Enjoyable

Sometimes a 30 minute break can recharge the batteries. Take a walk. Listen to a podcast. Shoot some hoops. Even a 20 minute power nap can make a huge difference.

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Sonia Simone

 

Copyblogger

Sonia Simone is Founding Partner and Chief Content Officer at Copyblogger. Everything she does and everything she’s done has been focused on creating more remarkable relationships with customers. When you communicate intense respect, integrity and an attitude of service, you’re rewarded with business. Simple, but rarely easy.

 

I think the most important thing you can do when you’re feeling lazy is … realize that you don’t need motivation. As Stephen Guise coaches, practice saying: “I believe that I can act no matter how I feel.” If you’re waiting around to feel un-lazy, you may be waiting a long time.

You can also light a fire under your backside by scheduling a Skype call or a meeting with a colleague to take the next action on the task. When you need to have your piece done or you’re letting down someone you respect, that can be extremely motivating. And don’t underestimate the power of a timer. If the laziness monster is really bad, set it for five minutes. Or do what I do, and set it for 25 minutes — but promise yourself you can quit after five if you’re really miserable. You’ll probably find, as I do, that the dread of “not-doing-it” is much worse than the mild annoyance of actually doing it.

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Ramsay Taplin

 

Blog Tyrant

Ramsay Taplin is the Owner and Founder at BlogTyrant.com. While attending university, he sold a fitness blog for 5-figures. This was the initial “spark” that caused him to delve deeper into professional blogging and internet marketing. He founded BlogTyrant.com as a way to share his experiments with blogging and online marketing so that others could jump forward and avoid some of the mistakes that he made. The site now gets well over 100,000 visitors per month and has been referenced by some of the world’s top marketing websites.

 

When I get a bit flat or down I try to remember that I want to build a company so that I can donate money to charity and do something useful with my resources. This gives me a bit more energy because it makes it more about other people. Secondly, I try to remember that the opportunity I have now won’t last forever so I should try to be active and motivated while this business model is working. Lastly, I try to change my scenery often. Having worked from a home office for almost a decade I really started to notice that I need to be outside or in a different work space even for half an hour a day. It helps me to feel less isolated, which is inherently not great for humans.

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Alp Turan

 

Guest Posting Game Plan

Alp is the founder of Trial & Eureka and the Guest Posting Game Plan. He helps online businesses build an email list of buyers and sell out their programmes. Once upon a time he tried to start a blog as a lawyer-turned-marketing strategist***, but ended up accidentally building a marketing agency instead. (***That sounds like “Sauron turned Sith”, but it’s all innocuous really.)

 

If I notice myself putting off a task, turning it into a game helps – especially if it involves a bit of friendly competition.

For example, I’ve been meaning to create a new course for several months but never got around to it. Then Bushra Azhar and I ended up challenging each other to a duel:

If I could build a mini-course in 48 hours using her course creation method, she’d pay $500 to a charity of my choosing. And if I failed, I’d donate to a charity of her choosing.

48 hours later, I had a mini course…

What I like about this approach is that it pushes all the right buttons for me:

There is an element of play, so it feels less like a chore and more like a challenge.

There is accountability built in because I gave her my word.

There is a ridiculous deadline which gives you monk-like focus on what’s essential. Parkinson’s Law in action: work expands so as to fill the time available for its completion.

And there is a gun-to-the-head which forces you to sit down and actually do it, in the form of a financial consequence.

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Digital Marketing

Harsh Agrawal

 

ShoutMeLoud

Harsh Agrawal is an award-winning professional blogger and the founder ShoutMeLoud and Shout University. ShoutMeLoud is one of the most popular international resources on blogging, SEO and internet marketing. When he’s not blogging, Harsh is probably traveling or trying a new kind of adventure sport.

 

 

I read actionable content. Stuff that provokes action or is a case study. Usually, I have found this one trick works best for me.

I start with doing lazy work. Stuff like which require less mental engagement & more action. One important thing to keep in mind is use Pomodoro technique along with this. As you don’t want to end up doing the same work for endless hours.

I Disconnect completely from the internet. Just a Pen, Paper & me. This is when new ideas start popping in. Every month, I have at least one such day when I’m not connected to the internet. This also helps in lower down overall fatigue/burnout.

 

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Jeff Bullas

 

JeffBullas.com

Jeff Bullas is an entrepreneur, blogger, author, marketer and speaker. He works with personal brands and business to optimize their online personal and company brands with emerging technologies, content, social media technologies and digital marketing.

 

When I feel lazy and need to ramp up the motivation I find these activation hacks can work well.

1) Read an inspiring book

2) Leap onto my bike and get the blood, legs and endorphins pumping

3) Strap myself into my chair and just start

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Pauline Cabrera

 

TwelveSkip

Pauline Cabrera has been working in the field of web design and development for more than eight years, with experience in both agency and in-house roles. She is the founder of TwelveSkip, a company that helps bloggers and small business owners maximize their online visibility.

 

Here are some motivational tips I use when I feel lazy:

  • I would re-write my plans and the expected outcome, that could change my mood and make me excited to get back to work.
  • Sometimes I feel lazy due to tiredness or lack of sleep, I would take a power nap to get an energy boost and become more productive.
  • I would go out to exercise or stretch to change my environment for a bit. This would help me improve my energy levels.

 

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Josh Coffy

 

Flight Media

Josh Coffy is a fully caffeinated, social media marketing expert. Between his 100,000+ social media followers, his 250,000+ annual blog visitors and the dozens of speeches he gives each year, his effective social media principles and strategies have gained massive traction in the marketing world. Why? Two words:they work. He’s spent the last four years crafting social marketing blueprints for hundreds of brands and has become one of the most sought-after digital marketing trainers on the planet. Josh owns a fast-growing digital marketing and design company, Flight Media, with offices in three countries, that manages millions of social media followers daily. They build high-converting websites and run digital marketing campaigns to help customers increase traffic, leads, and more importantly–revenue.

 

Laziness usually occurs when you lose focus of your purpose. When that happens, review your written goals. If you don’t have any yet, write them down.

What are you going to accomplish this quarter and this year?

Put them on sticky notes and post them in your office. By doing that, you’ll have a constant visualization of the goals you have that will help you achieve your purpose in life. Whenever I review my goals, I get a sense of invigoration and become motivated to accomplish things for that day.

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Annemarie Cross

 

AnnemarieCross.com

Annemarie Cross is a Brand & Communications Strategist. She specializes in Podcasting, Digital/Online technologies, Social Platforms and Compelling Story-Telling and Copywriting, working to help YOU boost your visibility, reach and influence. Known as the “Podcasting Queen,” her podcast has been listed in the Top 25 Podcasts for Entrepreneurs, Top 50 Podcast for Entrepreneurs, and Top 100 Small Business Podcasts worldwide by well-known and respected small business websites, including Entrepreneur.com.

 

1. Music – there’s nothing like a great list of songs to get your mind, body and spirit pumping so-much-so that you’re fired up and ready to go and get into action;

2. Change your focus – laziness for me can often be a sign that I need to change things up a bit, so I’ll work on a task or activity I enjoy. Sometimes that activity is one that’s outside of work, such as getting out into nature with my camera. Because I’m a passionate (amateur) photographer – I know there’s nothing better than escaping into the wild with my camera to re-energize me. [I’m also now using these photos as part of my social media inspirational quote images, so it’s a win-win];

3. Get a mentor and accountability partner – there’s nothing more motivating than knowing you’ve committed to achieving a goal and there’s someone who is going to check in with you on a regular basis to see how you are doing. There’s NO way I’m showing up to a meeting without having completed what I set my intentions on! No way!

And one last bonus tip…

4. Sleep (or rest). Sometimes when we’re feeling lazy it’s not because we just can’t be bothered, it’s because we’ve put in some solid work and we need to rest and re-energize. I’ve given myself permission to rest, when I need it. And, it’s in those quiet, restful times where I’ll often have some creative, innovative ideas bubble to the surface, which would not have been possible had I not taken time away.

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Gail Gardner

 

Grow Map

Gail Gardner provides expert advice to small businesses. She is the owner of GrowMap, a Cision Top 100 Site for Marketers that has received three Small Business Influencer Awards from Small Business Trends. She has been named a Top 50 SMB Influencer on Twitter by D&B.

 

1. First decide whether you lack motivation to do something in particular or you don’t feel like doing anything at all.

2. If it isn’t related to a particular project, take a break. Go outside, get some fresh air or play or listen to some music. There is no sense pushing yourself to work if you need to clear your mind or refresh your body.

3. When you realize you are avoiding working on a particular project or one aspect of it, break it down into smaller tasks and work on the most important one first. The sense of accomplishment at finishing any part of it will often encourage you to want to keep working on the next most critical task.

The best advice for success I ever heard was to tackle the most important, urgent task first and don’t work on anything else until that one is done.

The natural inclination is to want to get the little things “out of the way”, but doing that often leads to never getting to what is most important.

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Sashka Hanna-Rappl

 

BrandSashka

Sashka Hanna-Rappl is the founder of BrandSashka & Brand-ING Your Soul. Her work helps companies and entrepreneurs build a consistent brand to grow recognition and credibility. She’s a momma of 3 kids and wife to one husband.

 

I have some delicious tips for Rebels, Misfits, Visionaries and part Intro but mostly Extroverts when they’re slipping into those lazy days 

1. I immediately open YouTube and start listening to Dr Eric Thomas or amongst his long-term followers he’s known as “The Hip Hop Preacher”…. He’s so friggin’ on fire and after listening there is no way in HELL that I can stay lazy…It’s like a whiplash to the soul after listening to him. His most famous line from a story that he quotes: You must want to succeed with what you’re wanting as much as you’re needing to BREATH! YES!!!! (PS I just recently saw Eric Thomas LIVE in London and I cried for two hours – the man is so anointed).

2. I’ve been dancing since I was five years old. My brain has become accustomed to me being able to switch off during dancing – put me in a Yoga class and I’m out like a light! Put me in a Dance Class and I’m like “What’s happening?!” (think Will Smith, Kevin Hart or Carlton here)…and it’s like a button switches my brain off and I just go with the motion. Disclaimer: I’m not a participant in the class but actually TEACH the Dance Fitness classes… so there’s no time to be lazy whilst my brain’s switched off  haha

3. One of the following I then do (I can only mention three haha):

3.1: MOVIES MOVIES MOVIES – anything that Empowers the Underdog and is a leadership – feel good movie. This ranges from Toy Story through to Shawshank Redemption to The Jungle Book and Alice in Wonderland…. I mean with quotes like “Only the Impossible is Possible”…how the hell can I sit there and be LAZY? No way José 

3:2: We’ll be getting a pup soon as an addition to our super sporty family…and this doggy is going to be my salvation from the online world i.e. I have to take the dog to pee and poo otherwise it’s all over my house and that’s crap (excuse the pun)…

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Fabrizio Van Marciano

 

Magnet4Blogging

Fabrizio Van Marciano is a savvy blogger, web designer and digital marketer from England. He works to help others create a rocking online brand through smart web design and creative branding.

 

1. Avoid the things I planned to do and do something else entirely. There’s no point in trying to be productive when your heart is not in it I say. I’ll usually do an outdoor activity of some sort, or go to the gym.

2. However, if I’m feeling too lazy to even move or do an activity, I’ll watch something that will inspire me. This could be a inspiring story or motivational video on YouTube, or a movie of some sort.

3. Lastly, if I’m feeling really lazy, I’ll do some good old shopping online. The best lazy activity ever, and if I can purchase something that I can look forward to recieving, perhaps something I can use in my business, like some new software for instance, even better.

That being said, I do my best to try and avoid laziness syndrome. By keeping to a strict routine, exercising regularly (helps a lot), and rewarding myself every time I reach a certain milestone, I can keep laziness syndrome at bay most of the time.

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Roxana Nasoi

 

SERPlified

Roxana Nasoi is by definition a creative entrepreneur. She is a Data Analyst, Statistics consultant and Internet Marketing Pro. She has switched from Freelancing to Entrepreneurship, founded several ventures and is preparing to launch a 3rd one in 2017.

 

Here’s three ways I motivate myself and overcome laziness:

1. Mind Workout. I believe the human mind is like a muscle, and what better way to strengthen a muscle than to workout, right? I perform a series of concentration exercises in the morning, and de-concentration exercises in the evening. To give an example, start your morning with a simple mind exercise: count from 0 to 10 with your mind, and carefully envision each number, each detail. This will help increase focus throughout the day. In the evening, or before bedtime, “erase” with your mind the numbers from 10 to 0. This is called de-concentration. It will help you rest well.

2. Single tasking. We’ve been drawn into this abyss of multi-tasking, and that means our dedication gets divided by the number of things we set our mind to do. Take it one step at a time.

3. For extra spice, I always like to start with the least pleasant thing on my to-do list, inspired by the book “Eat that Frog” by Brian Tracy: “start with the ugliest frog first”. And progress towards the most pleasant one. This really gets you outside of your comfort zone, because we have a hedonistic nature: we like pleasure first. But pleasure first doesn’t always mean growth. Growth, motivation come from overcoming obstacles. So if something we’re not very fond of is taken care of, thus overcome, we get a boost of “hell yeah, I’ve done it”, and can proceed with doing things that we enjoy more. So a quick occasional step outside the comfort area can prove more motivational in the long run.

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Charles Ngo

 

CharlesNgo.com

Charles Ngo is one of the foremost affiliate marketers online, and made over $1 million in his first year. He has spoken at events in London, Ibiza, Bangkok, Singapore, Berlin, New York and many more. The readers at StackThatMoney voted CharlesNgo.com as the #1 Affiliate Marketing Blog online.

 

1. I don’t rely on motivation, I rely on habits / routines. This is MUCH more reliable since it lets me work even if I’m feeling lazy.

2. If I’m feeling lazy in the afternoon then I’ll “reset” my day. That means I’ll go for a run, shower, and make my coffee. I treat it like a new day.

3. I’ll think about my WHY. I remind myself of what my purpose is. I think about my family. I think about the people who rely on me. I let their energy motivate me.

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Sujan Patel

 

Webprofits.agency

Sujan Patel is a data-driven marketer and entrepreneur. He is the co-founder of WebProfits US, a growth marketing agency. In his 13 years in digital marketing Sujan has helped companies like Sales Force, TurboTax, Sony, Mint, and hundreds of others acquire more customers, build brand awareness, and grow their businesses. Sujan took everything he learned in his career and wrote a book to help marketers with growth with his book 100 Days of Growth.

 

1. I think about what other entrepreneurs/people are doing and how they’re getting ahead while I “rest up”.

2. I think that if I push myself passed this lazy point that in the future working and having energy right now will be my normal.

3. I think about one small thing I can do right now. Doing 1 small task will get off my butt and usually results in doing a few tasks.

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Don Purdum

 

Unveil the Web

Don Purdum is the Founder and owner of UnveiltheWeb.com and is an award winning blogger, author, speaker, business consultant and business coach. Don helps businesses discover their message by helping them identify the problems they solve, who they solve them for and how their products or services are part of the solution.

 

Motivation comes pretty simple to me as an optimist who isn’t naturally lazy. However, when I’m not in the “mood” here are my 3 motivational tips:

1. I remember those who I’ve worked with or who have thanked me for helping their business make the jump to the next level. There isn’t anything more satisfying to me!

2. I think about all the opportunities I would miss if I didn’t push through. It’s like going to the gym. I go 4 days per week and sometimes I have to remind myself that results are tied to activity.

3. I pick up the phone and I call my mentors. They remind me of why I do what I do and they inspire me with new ideas, thoughts and actionable items that get me excited.

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Jason Quey

 

The Storyteller Marketer

Jason Quey helps internet entrepreneurs connect with influencers to rapidly grow their business together on The Storyteller Marketer.

 

1. Prepare your schedule the night before. Having a schedule helps you focus on the tasks that need done and not wasting time on remembering your to do list.

2. Workout. Poor motivation often is a symptom of a lack of energy.

3. Pump up the music. Why do runners run faster to high-tempo music? In short, it motivates them. I’d recommend using a Pandora station like Tsunami by DVBBS as it is mainly lyric-free.

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Rick Ramos

 

HealthJoy

Rick Ramos is an online marketing professional with over 18 years of experience across multiple online and offline media channels. He is presently CMO of HealthJoy, an enterprise healthcare engagement platform. Rick is also the author of Amazon.com’s #1 rated best seller in advertising Content Marketing: Insider’s Secret to Online Sales & Lead Generation

 

1. We got a treadmill desk in the HealthJoy.com offices, so I first thing I always do when I’m feeling lazy at work is jump on it and get the blood flowing. It’s amazing how quickly your energy levels go up with just a little walking.

2. Drink some coffee – I usually have two expresso’s at work every day. One around 10am and another at 2pm. Nothing like a jolt of coffee to focus. Their is actually specific science to those times in regards to productivity.

3. Play some music – Who can listen to the theme song from Rocky and not feel like going for a run? That’s the power of music. I’ll listen to music thought out the day get pumped and focused. I personally don’t find it a distraction with some tasks. If I’m writing or doing some design work, I can blast up the jams and stay motivated.

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Dave Schneider

 

NinjaOutreach

Dave Schneider is currently the CEO and CoFounder of digital marketer software NinjaOutreach, which helps small businesses find and outreach to bloggers to grow their sales through blogger outreach. Previously, he worked at Capital One as a business analyst until 2012, when he left to travel to the world with his girlfriend (over 40+ countries visited). During this time he started several online businesses, which grossed several hundred thousand in revenue.

 

1) Sleep – this is a good option if you’re lacking motivation because you’re tired.

2) Work on something else – especially if you can do something that doesn’t exhaust you in the way that mental work does like manual labor, art, dance, etc.

3) Be social – go out and see and talk with people to separate yourself from your environment

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Jeremy Schoemaker

 

Shoe Money

Jeremy Schoemaker is a web entrepreneur, founder of NextPimp.com, ShoeMoney Media and PAR Program, and co-founder of the AuctionAds service. He is a frequent speaker at search engine marketing and affiliate conferences.

 

At this point in my life the biggest motivator is showing my kids what’s possible in life. I don’t feel like I have anything more to achieve in the internet marketing world but they are my legacy.

I love to make applications that solve problems and improve people’s lives. Some I make money from but most I don’t. The funny thing is the most money I have made came from free apps. The money was just a side effect.

I love to help others. Again at this point in my life I am pretty financially set and I consider myself retired for the most part. I am fortunate enough to be able to spend time helping people that are trying to be successful online. Not newbies interested in making money online but people that have companies and busting it but just need advice to take it to the next level.

Anyway that’s what motivates me.

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Dennis Seymour

 

DenSeymour.com

Dennis Seymour currently runs SeriousMD and LeapFroggr, a digital marketing and SEO company, based in the Philippines. Over the years, he and his team have worked with hundreds of companies, all around the world.

 

Each person is unique so here’s what I do to combat it:

1. I make sure I plan out my days at the start of the day. I need to see what I need to accomplish so I minimize the feeling of laziness.

2. If I feel lazy in the middle of the day, I’m just sleepy or tired so I take a nap! It’s not rocket science. Once you wake up, you’ll feel better and be more productive rather than sucking it up and “trying” to work.

3. I have a picture of my family in all my workspaces. Think about why you are doing it and just push through. Often times, when you feel lazy, it’s just procrastinating because something is tedious to do and not challenging. Just think of who or why you are doing this and power through.

It’s OK to feel lazy because it’s normal. That’s important to understand as entrepreneurs often “hate” on themselves if they feel this. Understanding how you “work” is vital to getting over this hump. Each of us react to things differently so test different things.

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Gideon Shalwick

 

Entrevana

Gideon Shalwick is a creative serial entrepreneur and loves helping people start global movements using video. So far, he has helped over 200,000 entrepreneurs grow their businesses using the power of video marketing. He is co-founder of Veeroll.com, a powerful platform that completely automates the production process for video advertising. And with over 20 MILLION video ads served already, Veeroll is set to disrupt the video advertising landscape forever! For Gideon’s rants and raves about entrepreneurship and living a fulfilled, action packed life, please visit www.entrevana.com.

 

I don’t believe in motivation much anymore. I’ve replaced it with inspiration.

Motivation comes from the outside. Inspiration comes from the inside.

The inside source is always more powerful and profound than the outside source.

When you’re truly aligned with your inner calling, laziness will be less of an issue.

But in the off chance where I DO feel lazy…

I just chill and take a break until I don’t feel lazy anymore.

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Dustin W. Stout

 

DustinStout.com

Dustin W. Stout is a digital media consultant and speaker who’s learned how to make a living from doing things he loves. Currently he is part owner and co-founder of Warfare Plugins, creators to the best social sharing plugin ever created. He’s also a husband, father of two boys, and has done a bit of acting and modeling.

 

For me, I rarely have to be intentionally motivated. The reason is because I’ve been in really low places (homeless) and I believe that going through those low places has given me a permanent drive to get up and start hustling every single day. But on that rare occasion I feel like I’m losing sight of working hard, I guess I instinctively think of these 3 things:

1. Why am I working so hard? For me this is a matter of providing a comfortable livelihood for my wife and (now) 3 children. They count on me to be the sole provider and I can’t let them down.

2. What one thing can I accomplish right now? Sometimes all it takes is a quick win to get me moving in the right direction.

3. What possibilities could be unlocked if I couldn’t fail today? This is a strong motivator because I’m a dreamer. Instead of thinking about negative consequences, I think to the positive consequences of the reward/potential of doing what I need to do. If you tell someone “work or your fired” it may not be as effective as “work hard and you could put an extra six figures in your bank account by the end of the week.”

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Terri Trespicio

 

Lights Camera Expert

Terri Trespicio is a New York-based writer, brand strategist, and the co-creator of Lights Camera Expert, a 6-week course on how to get more media attention. Her work has appeared in Jezebel, Marie Claire, O magazine, Prevention, and MindBodyGreen. Her TEDx talk, “Stop Searching for Your Passion,” has earned more than a million views. She’s also a stand-up comic and performs regularly all over NYC.

 

1. Shift gears. The answer to that tug of laziness is not to focus harder or sit longer. When I feel lazy, it tells me that whatever huge accomplishment I thought I’d do today is not happening, or at least, not all of it. When my brain has given up on me, I shift to a more physical task (um, that laundry ain’t going to do itself), or something that will move at a quicker pace. If the weather’s decent, a run through the park helps kick things up a notch and reset my attention span.

2. Limit the list. When you’re not feeling up to task, giving yourself more things to do or accomplish is not a motivator. I will make all kinds of deals with myself, and promise immediate rewards (chocolate, write to friends, watch a Golden Girls rerun), if I just get ‘x’ started–not even done! If i can do this one thing, I can do anything, is what I say.

3. Embrace the laziness. I take issue with this idea that I’m supposed to be setting the world on fire every second. I say this because I DO feel the pressure to do just that, and the struggle is real. Yet I know all kinds of very successful people who aren’t killing it every second of the day. If you feel lazy occasionally, it’s not a character flaw; it’s a sign that you need a period of rest. This idea that we need to blast every inch of laziness out of our lives with relentless productivity makes no sense. I build in a margin of time when I CAN be lazy–when I can putter around, shuffle papers, pretend I’m making things better, neater, cleaner. I need that. And so do you. Except I don’t call it laziness. I call it recovery.

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Stuart Walker

 

Niche Hacks

Stuart Walker is the founder of NicheHacks.com. To date, Stuart has revealed well over 1,500 hot niches. He’s living his dream of being location independent, and having traveled the world, thanks to internet marketing. The aim with Niche Hacks is to help you live your dream thanks to online marketing, whatever that may be.

 

1. Remind myself WHY I do this.

2. A change of scenery.

3. Re-read Eat That Frog.

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Entrepreneurship

Nellie Akalp

 

CorpNet

Nellie Akalp is a serial entrepreneur, small business advocate, speaker and author. Her first business was started with $100 and sold eight years later for $20 million. Today she is the founder & CEO of CorpNet.com, an online legal document filing service, where she helps entrepreneurs start a businessIncorporateForm an LLC, set up Sole Proprietorships (DBAs) and more for their businesses. Nellie has been named a Top 100 Small Business Influencer by Small Business Trends the last five years and CorpNet.com has been recognized on the Inc. 5000 list of fastest-growing privately-held companies in America in 2015 and 2016.

 

 

When I’m feeling lazy my number one go-to for motivation is always the gym. I take a fast paced cardio class and/or lift weights with my trainer. It always wakes me up and gets me going towards a productive day! If I don’t have time to go to the gym a strong cup of coffee alongside a quick call to my mentor also kicks my butt in gear!

 

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James Altucher

 

JamesAltucher.com

James Altucher is an American hedge fund manager, entrepreneur, bestselling author, and podcaster. He has founded or cofounded more than 20 companies, including Reset Inc. and StockPickr. He has published eleven books, and is a frequent media contributor. USA Today named his book Choose Yourself one of the 12 Best Business Books of All Time.

 

 

A) GET CREATIVE MUSCLE GOING. I write down ten ideas about anything.

The idea muscle is a muscle like any other. It needs constant exercise or it will atrophy. If I write ten ideas down, maybe they sill get the juices flowing. Or maybe not but they will still make me a better idea producer.

B) DIVERSIFY

I always have 5 projects going on. Sometimes my brain just doesn’t feel working on a project. Or I encounter a problem I can’t solve so I go into brain freeze (i.e. lazy).

If I always have projects I can switch to there will be at least one project I find interesting and I will work on it.

More than 5 projects is too much, Not enough time to make the good.

C) PLAY

I simply leave. I’ll go bowling. Play tennis. Play air hockey, Go the park and play chess. This loosens up my brain. Then when I get home, I’m refreshed and I can see things through new eyes.

 

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Erlend Bakke

 

You Will Never Work Again

Erlend Bakke is a Norwegian serial entrepreneur, speaker, and #1 international bestselling author born in 1981 in London, UK. He currently owns the following three companies Mr. Outsource3sixty, and 3sixtyfactory. Erlend speaks on the topics of entrepreneurship with focus on how to automate and outsource your business to avoid the trap of becoming a business prisoner.

 

1) Chunking

After writing down my goals for the month (I do that every morning) I circle the one that I´m going to work on that day. Then before checking anything like email or my phone I set my timer for 45 minutes and say to myself: all you have to do is do two chuncks of 45minutes and then you can take the rest of the day off. There is a lazy person in all of us and all we need to do is make it easy for that person to achieve a goal. Once you have a little momentum it´s easy to keep going. If I´m feeling extra lazy that day, I won´t work after the 90 minutes of deep focus work is done. Sometimes you need a day off.

2) Get clear

The first thing I do every morning is get clear by doing 24 minutes of TM Transcendental meditation followed by about 10-20 minutes of journaling. I find that when I have this habit I get a lot less lazy because I get clear on what I´m doing by clearing my head and focusing on what´s important in my life. Clarity is power!

3) Just move and breathe

Often times when we feel stuck all you have to do is move. I mean move your body, hit the gym or go for a walk. Get your body moving and it will change how you feel and your state of mind. It´s important to not think to much when you feel lazy and just know that if you stand up straight and just get your body moving, you will feel very different. My favorite 7 minute app is the Carot workout app on my iPhone.

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Corbett Barr

 

CorbettBarr.com

Corbett Barr is a blogger, podcaster, independent entrepreneur and co-founder/CEO of Fizzle, where he helps extraordinary people earn a living doing something they love. He splits his time between Portland and Mexico with his wife Jessalyn.

 

1) Reconnect with your “why.” Remember why you were working toward this goal in the first place. What’s the “big picture?” What meaningful outcomes are you working toward?

2) Change up your environment. Work from a new location. Try new music, a new setting, a new place.

3) Engage with interesting people and new experiences. Get out of your comfort zone and look for inspiration outside of your normal patterns.

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Evan Carmichael

 

Evan Carmichael

Evan Carmichael built then sold a biotech software company at age 19. At age 22, he was a VC helping raise $500k to $15mil. He now runs EvanCarmichael.com, a popular website for entrepreneurs. He aims to help 1 billion entrepreneurs. He loves being married, his son, salsa dancing, DJing, League of Legends, and the Toronto Blue Jays.

 

Note from Stephen: Evan and I did a YouTube video on the topic – watch the full interview here! Below is my summary of Evan’s three tips for motivation:

  • Have a strong why. Over the long term, you need a reason for doing what you’re doing.
  • Create an environment that supports you. Inpsiration only lasts so long. Make sure the content you consume, the people you spend time with, and where you are support your goals.
  • Model success. Build partnerships, connect with others who have been successful. You can learn and grow through those relationships.

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Annemarie Cross

 

AnnemarieCross.com

Annemarie Cross is a Brand & Communications Strategist. She specializes in Podcasting, Digital/Online technologies, Social Platforms and Compelling Story-Telling and Copywriting, working to help YOU boost your visibility, reach and influence. Known as the “Podcasting Queen,” her podcast has been listed in the Top 25 Podcasts for Entrepreneurs, Top 50 Podcast for Entrepreneurs, and Top 100 Small Business Podcasts worldwide by well-known and respected small business websites, including Entrepreneur.com.

 

1. Music – there’s nothing like a great list of songs to get your mind, body and spirit pumping so-much-so that you’re fired up and ready to go and get into action;

2. Change your focus – laziness for me can often be a sign that I need to change things up a bit, so I’ll work on a task or activity I enjoy. Sometimes that activity is one that’s outside of work, such as getting out into nature with my camera. Because I’m a passionate (amateur) photographer – I know there’s nothing better than escaping into the wild with my camera to re-energize me. [I’m also now using these photos as part of my social media inspirational quote images, so it’s a win-win];

3. Get a mentor and accountability partner – there’s nothing more motivating than knowing you’ve committed to achieving a goal and there’s someone who is going to check in with you on a regular basis to see how you are doing. There’s NO way I’m showing up to a meeting without having completed what I set my intentions on! No way!

And one last bonus tip…

4. Sleep (or rest). Sometimes when we’re feeling lazy it’s not because we just can’t be bothered, it’s because we’ve put in some solid work and we need to rest and re-energize. I’ve given myself permission to rest, when I need it. And, it’s in those quiet, restful times where I’ll often have some creative, innovative ideas bubble to the surface, which would not have been possible had I not taken time away.

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Ebong Eka

 

EbongEka.com

Ebong Eka is a certified public accountant, entrepreneur and former professional basketball player in Europe. He is a leadership, entrepreneur and small business expert who regularly appears on MSNBC, Fox News, Fox Business Channel, NBC and CNN. Ebong is also an accomplished TEDx Speaker, motivational speaker, Huffington Post Small Business Blogger and Office Depot Blogger. Ebong is the author of the book, “Start Me Up! – The No-Business-Plan Business Plan,” published by Career Press. Ebong is the Founder of EKAnomics, leadership and business development training company.

 

1. Revisit my goals – the tangible and specific goals…not the the “I want more money goals”.

2. Revisit why I started to begin with and WHO is relying on my to succeed. (Is it ego, family, legacy, bills, etc)

3. Read, review or watch a motivational video that inspires me into action.

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Greg Faxon

 

GregFaxon.com

Greg Faxon is the only business coach that makes entrepreneurs into champions. His mission is to help you get out of your own way and grow your business fast so that you can unleash your full potential. You can get started now by downloading a free chapter of his new book, Don’t Let The Fear Win, at gregfaxon.com/download.

 

1. If you’re feeling lazy, it’s probably a sign that you’re not pursuing something intrinsically motivating for you. So the answer isn’t to pump yourself up. It’s to re-align with your natural thirst by doing more of the activities that you don’t need additional motivation for.

2. Sometimes we think we’re lazy but we’re actually just tired. If you’re finding that you’re hesitant to take action, it could be a sign of burnout. Instead of beating yourself up accept that you’ve been stretched thin so that you can recharge your batteries and then go back into battle.

3. Are you lazy or are you scared? The biggest obstacle I see that confronts high-achievers isn’t procrastination. It’s Creative Avoidance. They stay busy with peripheral tasks as a way to hide instead of putting themselves in situations where they could fail or be judged.

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David Hassell

 

15Five

David Hassell is the founder and CEO of 15Five, a leading employee engagement solution that helps create high performing teams by combining pulse surveys, weekly check-ins, peer recognition, and people analytics all in one platform. Forbes has called him “the most connected man you don’t know in Silicon Valley.”

 

1) Actually BE lazy and relax. Most often when people are “feeling lazy” it’s usually combined with some stress, worry or self-criticism that they shouldn’t feel lazy and should be motivated. It’s counterintuitive but if you just actually give yourself the space to relax without guilt, often motivation will come back naturally.

2 & 3 are more ongoing practices:

2) Re-connect to your WHYs — before you start working, considering the impact and outcomes you’re looking to produce, and visualize them as if they already exist — what’s the impact on the world you’re looking to have, on your lifestyle, your finances, your family, etc. When you connect more deeply from that place, motivation follows.

3) Get enough sleep, exercise, and meditation (if that’s part of your practice) — intrinsic motivation is a wellspring if you know how to nurture it, and can dry up if you run yourself down or deplete yourself too much for too long.

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Ana Hoffman

 

Traffic Generation Cafe

Ana Hoffman is a successful internet entrepreneur and founder of Traffic Generation Cafe. She is also wife to a wonderful husband, and mother to a beautiful and, no doubt, genius little girl.

 

1. I keep a list of simple business tasks I can do when I don’t really want to do anything. For instance, clean up my computer folders. Or remove broken links. Usually, once I start working on a no-brainer task like that, next thing I know I keep on going.

2. My husband complaining about money does the trick like nothing else… 

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Lewis Howes

 

LewisHowes.com

Lewis Howes is the author of The School of Greatness. He is a lifestyle entrepreneur, business coach and keynote speaker. A former professional football player and two-sport All-American, he is a current USA Men’s National Handball Team athlete. Howes hosts The School of Greatness podcast and was recognized by President Obama as one of the top 100 entrepreneurs in the country under 30. He has been featured in The New York TimesPeopleMen’s HealthThe Today Show and other major media outlets.

 

 

  • Work out
  • Watch a motivational video
  • Reconnect to my vision

 

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Amber Hurdle

 

AmberHurdle.com

Amber Hurdle is a certified coach, speaker, trainer and host of the Bombshell Business Podcast. Amber uses her experience working with international celebrities and Fortune 500 companies to show small businesses how to play big. As a communication and engagement expert, she helps entrepreneurs identify what they want to be known for, so they can strategically tell their stories, grow their tribes, and ultimately find their calling.

 

1. Set a timer: I know me. I love a deadline and a sense of urgency. Most of my Bombshells tend to be the same way. The rush of racing the clock keeps you focused on winning.

2. Find a body double or accountability partner. In ADD-Friendly Ways to Organize Your Life, author Judith Kolberg recommends having someone simply be present as a body double. That person does not have to help you with whatever task you need complete, rather their presence occupies the part of your brain that desires to be distracted, affording you to actually focus on what you need to get done.

Alternatively, you can simply tell someone what you want them to expect you to accomplish by a determined deadline. Women, especially, do not like to let others down. They may let themselves down, but heaven forbid they let down anyone else. This is a strategy that uses that tendency to ultimately serve yourself…as you should be in the first place!

3. Change your environment. Whether that is moving into a different room, driving to a coffee shop or turning on music that shifts your energy, simply altering the space and sensory experience around you can help you have the mental shift that you need to get motivated.

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Joanna Jast

 

Shapeshifters Club

Joanna Jast helps career changers, entrepreneurs and freelancers accelerate their learning and personal change so they can adapt faster to the new environment. If you want to learn more about creating new habits faster, check her Hack Your Habits site and start improving your habits today.

 

3 tricks I use to ‘motivate’ myself when I feel lazy

 

Let me get this straight from the start: I’m lazy by nature, and I have an Instant Gratification Monkey living in my brain. But at the same time, I love the sense of fulfilment that comes from achieving my goals.

Obviously, most worthy goals are long term, and this is where my problem lies. I not only have my natural laziness to overcome, but also the Instant Gratification Monkey to fight.

Over the years, I figured out that the best way to get myself do things I need to do in order to achieve my goals is to outsmart those two.

Here is what I do:



1. ‘Just do this little thing for 2 minutes’ to get started

The first step is the hardest, so when I feel lazy and/or overwhelmed by the task I use this little trick to get myself under way quickly. I start with the easiest/fastest part of the task and tell myself I’ll do it only for 2 minutes ‘and then I’ll see’. More often than not, after those 2 min I just keep going.



2. Breaks and rewards to keep going

I divide my workload into manageable chunks, depending on the task and how badly lazy I feel. I take breaks more frequently than usually and have lots of little rewards to keep going.

Sometimes, on a really bad day, I can’t manage more than 10- 15 minutes of sustained work at the time, but that’s ok as long as I keep the breaks really short (1-3 min). After all, I can achieve much more in those 10 min bursts of activity than if I wasn’t doing anything at all.



3. Systems to outsmart my natural laziness and my Instant Gratification Monkey

This is my biggest ‘secret to success’. When I feel motivated and ‘pumped’ about new goal, I use this energy to create a system that will keep me working on the goal.

My systems are based on my weaknesses, previous failures and generally assume the worst-case scenario. I often go with the line of least resistance and make it so easy I cannot not do it, and create default options, so I don’t have any other choices. This way, they get me working even when I feel unmotivated, tired and super-lazy.

My smart systems are what makes me get up at 5am every morning, run 3 times per week, get work done on time, constantly learn new stuff, write and read books and articles, juggle a full time job, a business, a couple of side projects and – a family.

To learn more about my system to hack habits and outsmart poor motivation and weak willpower – click here.

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Nick Loper

 

Side Hustle Nation

Nick Loper is an online entrepreneur and lifelong student in the game of business who believes it’s all about the side hustle! He wants to help entrepreneurs launch their businesses or take their side hustles to the next level.

 

1. Break a sweat. Get off your butt and get moving. You’re not getting any work done anyway so you might as well do something healthy, and I think you’ll find it often sparks some renewed motivation.

2. Make it a game. Sometimes when I have a task I’m procrastinating on or just don’t want to do, I’ll set up a Pomodoro-style game: work 25 minutes, take a 5 minute break and reward myself w/ checking email or Facebook.

3. Do a micro-task. I live and die by my to-do lists, and get a lot of satisfaction from crossing something off – however small it is. Even if the task is quick and easy, sometimes knocking out two or three “easy wins” is enough to kick up the motivation to keep plowing ahead.

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Nancy Lublin

 

Dress for Success

Crisis Text Line

Nancy Lublin is a social entrepreneur who harnesses people, technology, and data to change the world. While many operate in traditional models of outreach and management, Lublin breaks them. She turns her new and effective solutions into some of today’s most innovative and disruptive nonprofits and social movements, which is why Fortune named her one of the “World’s 50 Greatest Leaders.”

 

When I feel lazy, I remember my clients at Dress for Success and I stfu and take care of business like the badass bitch I know I am.

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Kate Matsudaira

 

Ink and Volt

Kate Matsudaira is an experienced VP & CTO with a passion for large scale web systems and startups. She has extensive experience as a hands-on programmer with a strong interest in product. Her greatest asset is my ability to build great teams and execute quickly and efficiently on business goals. She is also a keynote speaker and has spoken at conferences all over the world on distributed systems, scaling, technology leadership, and entrepreneurship. She spends her days running the branding firm Urban Influence and operating the ecommerce website inkandvolt.com.

 

Here are my strategies for making progress, even when I am feeling unmotivated and uninspired:

  1. Take a walk. Sometimes just changing the scenery can moving around can get the creative juices flowing. And if the weather is bad and I can’t get outside, I will do mindless chores like the dishes or vacuum. That way I am taking my mind off the problem but still processing it in the background.
  2. Set a timer. If I set aside time to work on a task then I work on that task – even if I don’t feel like it. I make bargains with myself to just “write for 10 minutes” and set a timer. If I still don’t feel like writing after the timer goes off then I let myself move onto something else. However a lot of the time once I get into the groove I find it easier to just keep going!
  3. Break things down. One pattern I have is that when something is really big or hard I put it off – so in those cases I try to break the problem down to its smallest piece. For example, what can I search on Google to get started? Or what question can I ask someone about this issue to get me moving?

 

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John Meese

 

JohnMeese.me

John Meese helps new entrepreneurs start and grow an online business from scratch, even if they only have a few hours a week to spare. He teaches the strategies, systems, and software behind online business success through blog posts, podcast episodes, and online training programs (both free and paid), in addition to his strategic coaching programs.

 

 

  1. Get clear on why your work matters,
  2. Remind yourself ever day, and
  3. Create more than you consume.

 

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Sean Ogle

 

Location Rebel

Sean Ogle is the Head Rebel at Location Rebel, and his purpose is to help you build a small business that gives you the freedom and flexibility to work from anywhere in the world.

 

1) Remember, this lifestyle is a privilege not a right. I’m extremely lucky. At any point everything could disappear and I could have to go back to working a day job. This is all the motivation I need to continue working hard, growing the business, and helping other people do the same things I’ve been fortunate enough to do.

2) Surround myself with the things I want. This could be going to a car dealership to look at my dream car, walking through the neighborhoods I would most like to own a house in, or hanging photos of my dream destinations in my office. Having the things I want most surrounding me, makes me more likely to actually get them.,

3) Go back to my “motivation” email folder. I have a folder with dozens of emails from readers, friends, or Location Rebel members that for one reason or another I’ve found motivating. Reviewing that on a regular basis helps serve as a great motivational reminder.

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Jason Quey

 

The Storyteller Marketer

Jason Quey helps internet entrepreneurs connect with influencers to rapidly grow their business together on The Storyteller Marketer.

 

1. Prepare your schedule the night before. Having a schedule helps you focus on the tasks that need done and not wasting time on remembering your to do list.

2. Workout. Poor motivation often is a symptom of a lack of energy.

3. Pump up the music. Why do runners run faster to high-tempo music? In short, it motivates them. I’d recommend using a Pandora station like Tsunami by DVBBS as it is mainly lyric-free.

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John Rampton

 

JohnRampton.com

John Rampton is a serial entrepreneur. He loves helping people in addition to building amazing products and services that scale. John was recently named #2 on Top 50 Online Influencers in the World by Entrepreneur Magazine as well as a blogging expert by Forbes. Time Magazine recognized John as a motivational speaker that helps people find a “Sense of Meaning” in their lives. He currently advises several companies in the bay area.

 

1. I go for a walk. This wakes me up and reenergizes my body.

2. Give yourself a reason. I find when I’m not motivated, I’ve lost my reason for moving forward. I have to find it.

3. Get adequate sleep. This will help your mind be alert and awake.

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Stever Robbins

 

SteverRobbins.com

Stever Robbins helps people create extraordinary lives and careers through online workshops and one-on-one coaching in career planning, entrepreneurship, and life mastery. He is a co-founder of 3 companies, co-designer of the Harvard Business School Foundations program, and graduate of HBS and MIT. You can find him on the web at http://SteverRobbins.com

 

1. Take a break. We’re not built to go at peak productivity 100% of the time. Sometimes laziness is our unconscious mind’s sign that we need to back off and give ourselves some downtime. It’s often during that downtime that we actually come up with new, creative ideas.

2. Re-connect to my life purpose. Yeah, it sounds hokey. But at the end of the day, every action I am taking (or “should” take) is connected to a project which is connected to some life goal or something that’s important. I ask myself “why is this important?” several times until my answer ends up being something that’s connected to my highest level motivations. If I can’t find the connection, it may mean that the laziness is a signal that I’m doing something that should best be left undone.

3. Engage other people. Our brains treat obligations to others differently than we treat obligations to ourselves. One of my favorite group accountability projects is called a Do-it Day (http://doitdays.com) where we use personal connection to stay engaged and focused over the course of a work day.

Stever Robbins

host of The Get-it-Done Guy’s Quick and Dirty Tips to Work Less and Do More

Podcast: http://steverrobbins.com/thoughtfulgrowth

“Life map” chapter of my book (free): tweet THOUGHTFUL to 33444 for my book chapter about connecting your highest-level motivations to your daily activities.

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Dragos Roua

 

DragosRoua.com

Dragos Roua is a serial online entrepreneur, personal development fanatic, blogger, father, ultramarathoner, and tanguero. He has more than 15 years experience in starting, managing and upgrading (selling) companies, mainly in online publishing. He believes happiness is a process, not a goal.

 

1. Motivation is fantastic for starting things, moves energies around but it’s terrible at long term commitments – the faster the start, the sooner motivation ends.

2. So, when I set a specific, long-term goal, I just use motivation to start habits that will support me long-term.

3. I just rely on habits until I reach a plateau, then get back to number 1.

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Gideon Shalwick

 

Entrevana

Gideon Shalwick is a creative serial entrepreneur and loves helping people start global movements using video. So far, he has helped over 200,000 entrepreneurs grow their businesses using the power of video marketing. He is co-founder of Veeroll.com, a powerful platform that completely automates the production process for video advertising. And with over 20 MILLION video ads served already, Veeroll is set to disrupt the video advertising landscape forever! For Gideon’s rants and raves about entrepreneurship and living a fulfilled, action packed life, please visit www.entrevana.com.

 

I don’t believe in motivation much anymore. I’ve replaced it with inspiration.

Motivation comes from the outside. Inspiration comes from the inside.

The inside source is always more powerful and profound than the outside source.

When you’re truly aligned with your inner calling, laziness will be less of an issue.

But in the off chance where I DO feel lazy…

I just chill and take a break until I don’t feel lazy anymore.

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Sonia Thompson

 

TRY Business School

Sonia Thompson is a content marketing strategist that loves roaming the streets of foreign lands. She’s the founder of TRY Business School where she’s on a mission to help you develop and execute the right strategy for your business.

 

1. Think about what life would be like 1 year from now if I don’t get going. Not to say that things are terrible now, but every time I imagine being in the same position, I cringe at the thought of being stagnant rather than growing. That usually does the trick.

2. Activate the law of physics – I do one small task that helps to get me in motion. Once I’m in motion, I’m much more likely to keep going than to go back to being lazy. The momentum builds, and soon enough my task is complete. 

3. I write a list. There’s just something about being able to check a task off of my to-do-list that brings me joy!

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Deborah Tutnauer

 

DeborahTutnauer.com

Deborah Tutnauer helps frustrated and confused entrepreneurs get real about money, marketing and make the impact they want to make from a place of clarity and authenticity. Information on her coaching and client testimonials are available at DeborahTutnauer.com.

 

I may be different than most, but I believe that working in one’s flow is of the utmost importance. Though there will always be times when an entrepreneur must push through a difficult day or even a “boring” project and have “tricks” to move through reluctance, most the time if your business is structured well the work will be it’s own motivation. Allowing the flexibility for a down day is healthy and creates energy and flow during most other times. Laziness tends to be a symptom or clue, rather than a cause. People generally feel lazy if they are genuinely tired or under the weather or if they truly are not invested in the work or project at hand. Thus the motivational tip for laziness is to be fully tuned in to ones own values, expertise and mission and to design work in which you can engage with your full passion.

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Finance

Tiffany Aliche

 

The Budgetnista

Tiffany “The Budgetnista” Aliche is an award-winning teacher of financial empowerment and is quickly becoming America’s favorite personal financial educator. The Budgetnista specializes in the delivery of financial literacy and has served as the personal finance education expert for City National Bank. Author of two #1 Amazon bestsellers, The One Week Budget and Live Richer Challenge, Tiffany and her financial advice have been featured in multiple media outlets.

 

1. Take a real break. Sometimes lazy is a symptom of being overwhelmed and I need to recharge. The best way to do so is to take a real break, guilt and work free. I’ll veg-out and watch HGTV for a couple of hours, then take a walk or a nap.

2. Work on a passion project. When I don’t feel like working, sometimes it’s because I need to be inspired. Working on a passion project inspires me to wake up early again. My current passion project is a children’s book I’m working on.

3. Change my work environment. We all need a change of pace sometimes. I typically work from my office or home. If I’m feeling lazy sometimes working at my local coffee shop can get me out of my funk.

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Sophia Bera

 

Gen Y Planning

Sophia Bera, CFP® is not your father’s financial planner. After working in traditional financial planning firms since 2007 she quit her job at a NY start-up to launch her own firm, Gen Y Planning. Now, she runs a 6-figure online business from her laptop. Her recent accolades include the “Top 40 Under 40” by Investment News, “10 young Advisors to Watch” by Financial Advisor Magazine, and “10 of the Best Personal Finance Experts on Twitter.”

 

I use a Pomodoro app on my phone. When I feel stuck, I know that I just need to get started. This is one of the best ways I know to get started!

Call an entrepreneur friend. If my head is swimming with business ideas and I’m feeling overwhelmed with where to start, sometimes that means I need to talk it out. I’ll call another friend and just by talking it through the solution will come and I’ll know the first step.

Walk to the coffee shop. I really love getting fresh air. It’s one of the reasons I moved to Austin, so that I can be outside year round! I often find that by walking to my favorite coffee shop I’ll be ready to jump back into work by the time the 15 minutes is up. Just some fresh air and a new location are enough to clear my head and hit the restart button.

I’d also like to remind everyone that we need to be practice self-care. Sometimes we push ourselves so hard that it’s actually unhealthy. If you’re feeling lazy there might be a bigger reason why. Are you getting enough sleep? When was the last time you ate something? Are you eating food that makes you feel lethargic? Are you getting sick? When was the last time you went to the doctor? Does your back and neck hurt from too many hours in front of the computer?

Sometimes we need a break, or a massage, or to let ourselves sleep in, or go to the doctor, or our therapist. Be kinder to yourself and practice self-care. Remember: self-care isn’t all about pedicures and massages, it’s also things like going to the dentist and working through mental health issues.

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Jeremy Biberdorf

 

Modest Money

Jeremy Biberdorf is the founder of Modest Money, a web publication providing breaking investment news and analysis. Jeremy also created the Top Finance Blogs List, a massive resource providing the rankings of hundreds of sites.

 

1) Use a whiteboard in a highly visible location with both short and and longer term tasks. For me personally, I get obsessed with clearing off some tasks every day and working through my to do list quickly.

2) If you do get lazy take a moment to think of what you are ultimately working towards. It might be something you are saving towards such as a vacation, vehicle or home. In my case it’s my 9 month old daughter and providing a good future for her.

3) Avoid distractions. If you have lots of distractions around it’s easy to get drawn into that. That includes things like watching tv, browsing social media, video games, etc. Less obvious is simple things like clutter on your desk or elsewhere in your office.

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Robert Farrington

 

The College Investor

Robert Farrington is America’s Millennial Money Expert™ and America’s Student Loan Debt Expert™. He is also the founder of The College Investor, which is the #1 resource for helping millennials get out of student loan debt and start building real wealth for their future. He’s been on this mission since 2009.

 

If I’m feeling lazy, I usually do the following:

1. Get outside to re-energize. Whether it’s going for a walk, or playing with my kids, getting some sun and fresh air is huge.

2. Review my goals. I keep my goals posted on a white board above my desk. I look at them and reassess what I’m doing to drive myself to them.

3. Realize it’s okay to be strategically lazy. I also think it’s important to be strategic in “do nothing time”, where you watch TV, play games, or honestly shut everything else off. But be strategic. Get a routine. Typically I watch at least part of a movie before bed at night. This helps turn my brain off, so I need it.

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Barbara Friedberg

 

Robo Advisor Pros

Barbara Friedberg has decades of finance and investing experience. She is a former investment portfolio manager and taught Finance and Investments at several universities. Her published work includesPersonal Finance: An Encyclopedia of Modern Money Management,Invest and Beat the Pros-Create and Manage a Successful Investment Portfolio and How to Get Rich; Without Winning the Lottery. Her work is featured in U.S. News & World Report, Investopedia, Yahoo!Finance, GoBankingRates and many more publications.

 

This one’s easy-whisker goal. Do the tiniest thing thing you can think of towards your most important priority. For example, “Sit at your desk and write one word”.

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Deacon Hayes

 

WellKeptWallet.com

Deacon Hayes is a Financial Expert who is best known for paying off $52,000 in consumer debt in 18 months. Through his company Well Kept Wallet, he has helped thousands of people develop a financial game plan so they can achieve their financial goals in life. He has been featured in the US News & World Report, MSN Money, Yahoo Finance and more.

 

When I feel lazy I often go for a walk or at the very least get up from my chair and stretch. Sometimes I just need to get the blood flow going because I sit for long periods of time. Another thing that I do is I hire people to help me with certain tasks. It is hard for me to do certain things by myself, so sometimes hiring someone to help me get stuff done has been helpful. Lastly, I listen to music to get motivated. I find this helpful when I need an extra push to get things done.

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Hilary Hendershott

 

Hilary Hendershott Financial

Hilary Hendershott is the founder and CEO of Hilary Hendershott Wealth Management, a service where she serves women who already have $500,000 in investable assets. Hilary provides her special version of the top tier wealth management services evolved investors expect, delivered in ways that feel more like a relaxing day at the spa than a tedious meeting with the accountant.

 

What I have learned is that my feelings to not have to dictate my behavior. I have built a skill around doing what needs to be done, doing what I said I’d do, and doing what’s in line with my commitments regardless of how I feel. I get plenty of rest, so my body is taken care of and “feeling lazy” isn’t a function of needing down time for recuperation. If I need to get things done, all I have to do is generate the activation energy required to get up off the couch or simply start the action and momentum takes care of the rest.

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Jesse Mecham

 

You Need A Budget (YNAB)

Jesse Mecham is a recovering CPA that started a company called “You Need A Budget” (Y-NAB, if you’re busy) while in college. He teaches people the unique Four-Rule Method that completely transforms how they view and manage their money. When people follow the YNAB Method, they break the paycheck to paycheck cycle, get out of debt, and save more money.

 

If I’m not feeling particularly motivated to do some thing, I:

1) Go for a short walk. Fifteen minutes, tops.

2) I have what I call the “Three Minute Rule.” I’ll set a timer for three minutes, say “Go!”, and start frantically working on whatever I’m resisting for three minutes straight. Usually, that breaks down any mental barrier I have and I blow past the timer and get it done. If I still am not feeling it after the three minutes (a rarity), I’ll do something else and schedule the task I’m dreading for later.

3) This isn’t a tip, per se. But if you really aren’t feeling motivated to do something, maybe you shouldn’t be doing that thing? Just a thought.

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J. Money

 

RockstarFinance.com

Budgets are Sexy

J. Money is an award winning blogger, consultant, experimenter, and daddy. With over eight years building communities online, Jay’s projects have reached 20 million+ views and are routinely featured in the media. He loves coffee, hip-hop, personal finance, and hooking people up.

 

#1) Downing a coffee, water, or beer. I always get a boost at least for 20 mins or so drinking either of those.

#2) Going on a walk – nothing clears the mind and gets you motivated to take action after that! (Plus – just going on the walk to begin with means you’re not lazy – so double win!)

#3) Doing the dishes – I don’t know why, but it’s one of my favorite things to do when I don’t want to do the thing that I really *need* to do. And similar to going for a walk, you also get something accomplished while you’re working up the motivation.

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Robert Pagliarini

 

Pacifica Wealth

Robert Pagliarini is a Mission Viejo financial planner and president of Pacifica Wealth Advisors – a preeminent financial planning and wealth management firm with a national reputation for serving affluent investors and sudden wealth recipients. Robert relies on his nearly two decades of financial experience as well as his master’s degrees in financial services and psychology to provide comprehensive and personal wealth management solutions. Robert is the author of the new book, The Sudden Wealth Solution: 12 Principles to Transform Sudden Wealth Into Lasting Wealth.

 

Use fear. What will you lose by not taking the action? Build it up so much that the fear pushes you to do something.

If something is so large an overwhelming, figure out the very smallest action you could take that move it forward and do ONLY that.

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Kimberly Palmer

 

Kimberly-Palmer.com

Kimberly Palmer is the author of Smart Mom, Rich Mom: How to Build Wealth While Raising a Family, a money/career guide for moms. Previously, she wrote two books,The Economy of You: Discover Your Inner Entrepreneur and Recession-Proof Your Life, and Generation Earn: The Young Professional’s Guide to Spending, Investing, and Giving Back.

 

1. I go running, which always makes me feel more motivate to tackle hard things.

2. I drink a giant cup of coffee.

3. I make lists about the things I need to do and prioritize them and think about what I can cut.

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Victor Ricciardi

 

Goucher College

Victor Ricciardi is a Finance Professor at Goucher College in Baltimore, Maryland and co-editor of the book Investor Behavior: The Psychology of Financial Planning and Investing.

 

Here are three research themes from behavioral finance on motivated related topics:

Developing a Financial Objective : Motivate yourself around financial goals. For example, balance satisfaction and motivation when saving money to purchase a home. Tell yourself you will be satisfied with a 2-bedroom home and motivated to buy the house of your dreams which is a 4-bedroom house.

Saving for Retirement : Americans have a tendency to suffer from inertia or status quo bias when saving for retirement because retirement for many of us is years away. Motivate yourself by picturing all the fun things and activities you can do in retirement like taking extra vacations or playing golf if you reach your investment goals. This helps us spend less money today and motivates us to save for tomorrow.

Budgets and Credit Card Debt : Develop a plan to live on a budget and pay off all your credit debt. The motivation is to treat yourself to a budgeted consumer purchase one time per year when you have paid off all outstanding credit card debt. The outcome of this achievement is stronger financial health and well-being resulting in the ability to buy your dream house and save for retirement.

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J.D. Roth

 

Money Boss

J.D. Roth is an acclaimed blogger and the founder of MoneyBoss.com. He founded Get Rich Slowly, wroteYour Money: The Missing Manual, created the year-long“Get Rich Slowly” course, and contributed the monthly ” Your Money” column to Entrepreneur magazine.

 

* Do SOMETHING. Anything. It doesn’t matter what, so long as it’s productive. We have a tendency to believe that motivation has to come before action, but that’s often not the case. Many times, it’s action that creates motivation. If instead of sitting around waiting for inspiration you were to just begin working, motivation would come.

* You can trick yourself into action when you’re feeling lazy by telling yourself you’ll do “just one thing”. If you’re feeling overwhelmed, simply pick ONE task to accomplish. This can be something small (such as running a quick errand) or it can be a piece of a larger project. Once you accomplish that first thing, you’ll be much more inclined to tackle a second and a third job. But start with just one.

* My final tip: When you’re having trouble getting motivated, pick a project that you feel passionate about and work on that. Sure, there might be more important tasks you should tackle first, but if you’re procrastinating those by doing something unproductive (TV, videogames, etc.), it’s better to shift your focus to work you actually want to do. Allow yourself an hour or two to work on a passion project, and that’ll fire your internal motivation so that you can shift your attention to the more important tasks.

 

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Joe Saul-Sehy

 

Stacking Benjamins

Joe is the host of the award winning Stacking Benjamins podcast (Kiplinger just called it “Best of 2016”). While most shows focus on hard-edged money topics, Stacking Benjamins takes a lighter, innovative approach emphasizing play, which has been written about in Inc. and FastCompany. You’ll find the show wherever you listen to podcasts.

 

Getting motivated when it isn’t “my day” is a dragon I fight often. The first way I fight it is to change my state. I will go for a run or do a quick workout. That simple change usually increases my energy and gets me motivated. Second, I know myself and that I’m competitive. I think about all of those people around the world competing against me who are working while I’m wasting time. Finally, as I get older I realize just how little time I have. Simply thinking about the fact that the clock is always ticking scares me into action, If those three don’t work? In the few cases where I still can’t get up and rolling I realize that it MUST be time for a break. Time away isn’t always bad, and staying fresh can make it easier for me to accomplish awesome tasks later.

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John Schmoll

 

Frugal Rules

John Schmoll is a veteran of the financial services industry who’s learned the hard way how to invest, save, and manage his money. At Frugal Rules, he’s created an online community where together, he helps readers pursue financial literacy and freedom.

 

-I’m a big believer in using a to-do list. Not just a daily/weekly one, but a long-term one that’s inline with goals. Laziness wastes time and I use my to-do list as motivation to see how I can better utilize my time to reach those goals.

-I remove temptations, such as Facebook or other social media, from me as they’re a time suck. That may mean I go for a walk to clear my head which usually results in regaining focus.

-Do something physical like yard work. If I’m lazy and don’t feel like working on something I find that doing something physical helps me accomplish something and build momentum to accomplish other things I need to work on.

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Jeremy Schoemaker

 

Shoe Money

Jeremy Schoemaker is a web entrepreneur, founder of NextPimp.com, ShoeMoney Media and PAR Program, and co-founder of the AuctionAds service. He is a frequent speaker at search engine marketing and affiliate conferences.

 

At this point in my life the biggest motivator is showing my kids what’s possible in life. I don’t feel like I have anything more to achieve in the internet marketing world but they are my legacy.

I love to make applications that solve problems and improve people’s lives. Some I make money from but most I don’t. The funny thing is the most money I have made came from free apps. The money was just a side effect.

I love to help others. Again at this point in my life I am pretty financially set and I consider myself retired for the most part. I am fortunate enough to be able to spend time helping people that are trying to be successful online. Not newbies interested in making money online but people that have companies and busting it but just need advice to take it to the next level.

Anyway that’s what motivates me.

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Andrew Schrage

 

Money Crashers

Andrew Schrage is co-owner of Money Crashers Personal Finance. He majored in Economics while in school and has found it to be very applicable to everyday life and useful in understanding the economy and everyday topics like retirement, savings, and credit cards. He also gained some great investment experience previously working at a hedge fund.

 

What 3 tips for motivation do you use when you feel lazy?

One way to motivate yourself when feeling lazy is to do some physical activity. Getting that heart rate up and blood flowing should be all you need to ward off the laziness. Another is to simply let yourself be lazy, but only for a set period of time. When that feeling creeps in, tell yourself that you can do nothing for say one hour, then it’s time to go back to work and be productive. And finally, one reason that laziness or feelings thereof can tend to pop up is because of a disorganized environment. To stop or keep that from happening, take a few moments to organize yourdesk, and clean your house if you’re awork from home type. Organization promotes structure and order, and could very well solve your issues or feelings of not wanting to work.

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Philip Taylor

 

PT Money

Philip Taylor is an entrepreneur and CPA currently obsessed with creating the best annual conference for the financial media community. He’s the founder of FinCon: Where Money and Media Meet and the Ffunder of PT Money: Personal Finance.

 

Change your scene. When I feel bogged down I go for a walk or grab my laptop and head to a different place to work, like a local restaurant or coffee shop.

Go back to your goals. Hopefully each task I’m doing is tied somehow to one of my larger life goals. It’s easy to lose sight of this. So I try to trace my task back to my higher level goals for a little perspective.

Dangle the carrot stick. Promise yourself a little positive reward (can be as simple as candy) for finishing your next task.

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Melissa Tosetti

 

The Savvy Life

Melissa Tosetti is the author of the international best seller Living the Savvy Life and founder of The Savvy Life, an online lifestyle magazine for women who want to enjoy life with the money they are making right now. As much as she loves writing about personal finance, she especially enjoys speaking, giving seminars and working 1:1 with coaching clients.

 

 

  • I have pictures of my goals hanging on the wall of my office. They keep me motivated.
  • I go to my Pinterest account and read the board of motivational quotes I’ve collected over the years.
  • I work in 30, 20 or 15 minute chunks, depending on just how lazy I am. I wrote Living The Savvy Life in 30 minute chunks over 3 months. It works!

 

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Todd R. Tresidder

 

FinancialMentor.com

Todd R. Tresidder is a former investment hedge fund manager turned writer and financial educator who offers coaching, a blog, and ebooks on how to build wealth and invest smarter at FinancialMentor.com. Todd’s goal is to help millions of people lead happier, more productive lives by freeing themselves from the financial tyranny caused by poor decisions and planning.

 

The 3 things I do to motivate when I feel lazy are as follows:

1. Eat chocolate – but only really good, dark chocolate.

2. Suck it up – Most of the time laziness is really resistance in disguise. It happens with every new project. If I just can push through the initial barrier by forcing myself to take action, even if it hurts, then motivation nearly always returns as soon as progress occurs.

3. Reconnect to values and goals – For really stubborn laziness it means there’s a disconnect between what I’m pretending I want versus what I really want. This forces me to reconnect inside to what’s really most important by course correcting until motivation and excitement for my life path returns.

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Fitness

Ankur Ambastha

 

Ambastha Athletics

Ankur (aka “Encore”) is a personal trainer & nutrition specialist who makes health & fitness more attainable for busy people by helping them build easy, but powerful, habits that fit their unique lifestyles. He’s also a lifelong learner and personal development fanatic on a mission to help others live more healthy, happy, and successful lives!

 

1) Pause and take a minute to dream about your why

Think about why you want to do whatever it is you’re feeling lazy towards. Imagine the value it’ll bring you once you do it, how it’ll improve your life, or just the fact that once you get it done you can check it off your list, stop stressing over it, and stop wasting valuable time trying to decide whether or not to do it (do it, move on, and go live your life)!

Exercise Example (aka one of the biggest PITA’s)

Let’s get real and more specific. If it’s laziness holding you back from something like exercising, don’t feel bad for wanting to do what’s easiest in the moment, which is skipping your workout today (and telling ourselves we’ll “definitely” exercise tomorrow). You already know that what’s good for us long-term can feel like torture short-term, and that’s totally normal, we all go through it! When you feel like that though, take a second to think about why you want to exercise in the first place.

Remind yourself why it’s important and why the grunt work today will pay off tomorrow…

– Do you want to love what you see in the mirror every morning?

– Or get in such great shape that people are immediately drawn to you, including “the one”?

– Or do you want the most energy possible so you can live fully every single day?

How good will you feel about yourself once you’re there? How much better will your life be? And what awesome things will you be doing then, that you can’t do now?

TLDR: Life is short, so make sure you dream big, dream often, and put in the work to make your dreams a reality! On a related note, if your dreams aren’t powerful enough to get you moving, maybe it’s just not a true priority for you right now. Just think about it and be honest with yourself, no harm done or future energy wasted.

2) Break it up and crush a Pomodoro!

This one is deceptively simple.

But, it’s so powerful that it has massively transformed the way I work and skyrocketed my productivity levels, all while actually making it easier to get started working initially (even when all I wanna do is just lay on the ground doing nothing…and I have wood floors)!

Try it, you’ll love it!:

1. Write down what are struggling to get done

2. Break it down into small, actionable pieces that you can do in under 25 minutes each

3. Start a timer for 25 minutes and work 100% focused, to knock 1 task out of the water!

Congratulations, now you’ve beaten laziness, gotten amazing work done, and even earned yourself 5 minutes to celebrate your first win! To keep up your newfound momentum, repeat 3 more 25 minute sprints (& 2 more 5 minute breaks), then reward yourself with a 15 minute break to recharge your focus and energy before powering through even more laziness-inducing tasks! High five, you’re on a roll!

More information on the Pomodoro Technique & the simple, but effective, Chrome Browser Extension I use called TimeDoser .

3) Build your iron willpower by pushing through the…*insert expletive here*

This tip is a mindset hack (and 2 tips in one for more bang for your buck; you’re welcome!).

Loosely defined, willpower is your ability to get yourself to do something you’d rather not do (i.e. something you feel too lazy to do). Willpower also works like a muscle in the sense that it’s exhausted short-term when you use it, but grows stronger in the long-run the more intensely you use it, let it to recover, and repeat.

1. So, first, make sure that you have enough willpower stored for whatever it is you’re dreading doing. As a simple example, that could mean exercising in the morning when you’re motivated with a full tank of willpower, instead of in the evening when you’re exhausted after a long day. Or using your willpower in the morning to pack healthy meals for the day to eat when your willpower is low and you want to grab unhealthy snacks (good ol’ laziness haha).

2. And, when you’re struggling to get yourself to do something, remember that everytime you push past laziness, you’re strengthening your ability to push past it more easily in the future. Meaning, the more times you push yourself to exercise when you don’t feel like it, the easier it becomes to exercise in the future (who knows, you might even end up liking it!). This even applies to being able to resist the temptation of junk food more easily over time (that’s iron willpower for sure)!

So, use your limited willpower wisely, and use it often to make it stronger in the future! Eventually you’ll become a machine that can stomp out laziness with ease! You go!

* * * THOUGHTFUL GROWTH ACTION TAKER BONUS * * *

Speaking of beating laziness, do you struggle with making time to exercise and being able to exercise regularly, like I definitely have?

I have been learning about health & fitness for about 15 years and I want to help make things much easier for you. You don’t need to feel like you don’t have the time to exercise or fall off every time you try.

* * * I want to walk you through 3 simple steps you can take right now in 2 minutes to make it easier to exercise regularly.

That’s my promise to you, and to make sure you’re 100% ready to get more fit & healthy, I made a bundle of helpful free bonuses just for being a highly-motivated Thoughtful Growth action taker, including a downloadable weekly contract to keep you consistent, a workout guide, and a huge surprise gift you’ll love (I’ve never gifted this before)!

Take the 2 minute steps and get your free bonus fill-in-the-blank worksheet, guides, videos, and gift here: http://ambasthaathletics.com/thoughtful-growth-beating-laziness/

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Gillian B

 

GillianB.com

Gillian is a Self-Care Teacher living in Victoria, BC. Her mission is to empower her students to take personal responsibility and aligned action to create the best life ever. She shares her message of holistic health, yoga, spirituality and self-love through her writing, online course Healthy Living 101, transformational mentoring and international retreats. Gillian truly lives and breathes what she does, her intent is to inspire positive change in as many people as possible, leading by example.

 

1) Visualizing Your Future Self: I lean into how much better I will feel after a workout, yoga practice or a healthy homemade meal.

2) Recruit a Friend: Having someone to hold me accountable is am important factor for me! Luckily it’s easy to recruit friends for a hike in the woods or a walk on the boardwalk.

3) Set Yourself Up for Success: Make the healthier choice a no-brainer. This could mean prepping healthy food so it’s ready during busier times, not keeping your forbidden foods in the house to tempt you or placing your yoga gear at the end of your bed so it’s the first thing you grab and put on in the morning.

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Amy Clover

 

Strong Inside Out

Amy Clover is a fitness personality, motivational speaker and the force behind Strong Inside Out, a site that helps people “become stronger than their struggle” through mindfulness, movement and positive action.

 

1. I recognize that “lazy” is often a term that my inner perfectionist throws at me when I rest. I check myself before I wreck myself: did I need rest or productivity more right now? Then, I honor what I honestly need.

2. I commit to just 10 minutes of whatever it is I’m resisting. Usually, 10 minutes is long enough to: break through the hardest part of a workout; get interested enough in a work task to keep going; or get a good chunk of whatever it is done. I assure myself that I can stop after 10 minutes if I need to, but I rarely do.

3. I move first. If I’m dragging on a work task, chances are I need to clear my head with some kind of movement. I’ve found that I’m more clear-headed when I do a workout of at least 20 minutes. Science says I’m not the only one.

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Donna Davidge

 

SewallHouse.com

DonnaDavidgeYoga.com

Donna (amrita) Davidge is the owner of Sewall House Yoga retreat in Maine and Yoga instructor in New York City since 1985. Donna (Amrita) guides you through various forms of yoga and brings her 30 years of yoga teaching to you. Her video Kundalini Yoga The Challenge was chosen top ten by Yoga Journal in 2000 and is being rereleased in 2017.

 

3 tips for motivation-

1-Living with uncertainty makes life exciting so keep scaring yourself with things that excite you even if they seem impossible

2- Sweat and laugh every day-yogi bhajan (I promise you will feel more enthusiastic!)

3- give to strangers and friends randomly- it keeps you motivated to stay alert to those around you and positive karma gives amazing payback

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JC Deen

 

JCD Fitness

JC is a traditional fitness coach with a non-traditional approach to his work. A fitness coach who focuses on brand, quality, and results, JC is a holistic thinker who weaves together bodybuilding, eastern philosophy, and lifestyle design into his work. He is an open-minded life-long learner who has been learning as much as he can about fitness since the age of 18. Few coaches who make the decision to go all-in and ignore the typical marketing tactics of the fitness industry, but JC has done just that.

 

1. If I’m physically tired and need to get something done or finished, I will get up and go for a walk to break the monotony.

2. I try to limit my tasks to 3-5 things per day to make sure I don’t feel overwhelmed and get behind.

3. I try not to rely on motivation and I aim to focus on movement instead. (did a video on it)

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Heather Frey

 

SmashFit

Heather Frey is an entrepreneur, Fitness Strategist, clean eating advocate, trainer, writer, speaker, artist, and former Figure Competitor. Heather has worked with countless clients to create health and fitness strategies that work into their life; do-able, manageable plans that make sense so they can have lifelong fitness.

 

Since my expertise is in fitness, this is one of the biggest issues I work on with my clients… how to make yourself do something when you don’t really want to. Here’s my advice summed up.

1. Imagine how you’ll feel if you don’t hit the gym, or make it to your class.

Success isn’t one giant step, it’s lots and lots of small ones put together so every time you miss a step, it just means it’ll take you that much longer to hit your goal. Every singe step – a workout, a healthy meal, passing on junk food – means the faster you will get where you want to go!

2. Just do the first step, like get dressed for the gym, or at leasts put on your sneakers. If you’re dressed and ready, you’re more likely to go.

3. Lie to yourself, just a little. If you’re tired and don’t really feel like a big workout, tell yourself you’re just going to do a short one. Chances are, once you get moving, those endorphins kick in and you’ll get it all done. Because starting is the first step to finishing strong.

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Nate Green

 

NateGreen.org

Nate Green is an author, writer, marketing strategist and fitness expert. His articles have been featured in Men’s Health, Men’s Fitness, on Livestrong.com, and Tim Ferriss’s blog. He is the author of Built For Show, theThe Hero Handbook and Bigger, Smaller, Bigger.

 

1. Ask: Why am I feeling lazy? Am I tired? Should I be getting more sleep? Do I feel stuck at my job or in my relationship? Or do I simply just not want to do anything?

2. Use your answer to that question to dictate what you do next. Go to bed early tonight. Research other job opportunities. Have a difficult conversation with your partner. Or just embrace the laziness and don’t beat yourself up for it. We all feel lazy sometimes. It’s not a bad thing.

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Ben Greenfield

 

Ben Greenfield Fitness

Ben Greenfield’s mission is to show you how to get your body performing at peak capacity, with maximum fat burning efficiency and ideal hormonal and health status, in the safest and fastest way possible. Ben teaches people how to become Superhuman as fast as possible, as safely as possible.

 

Tip 1. Take a cold shower. I personally do it twice a day.

Tip 2. Rub peppermint essential oil on your upper lip. Faster, more convenient and just as effective as a cup of coffee.

Tip 3. Read Theodore Roosevelt’s “Man In The Arena” Speech. It’s on my coffee mug and a poster in my office. Google it. You will then understand.

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Kate Horney

 

BeyondFit Physiques

Kate Horney holds a Bachelor’s degree in Health and Exercise Science and is a Metabolic Effect certified Level III Hormonal Nutrition Consultant. She specializes in female-specific fat loss, using proven techniques to offer body change and coaching services to women both online and locally. She launched Bikini Boot Camp for moms and busy women who want more out of their fitness program.

 

JUST. DO. SOMETHING.

Really, it comes down to either doing something or nothing… it’s your choice. It’s ok if you can’t commit to a full workout, or every single task on your to do list. That’s ok! I suggest breaking up the task into 10-minute increments- then work your way up to 20 or 30-minute “somethings” as you can. The key is to do SOMETHING!

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Radhika Khanna

 

RadhikaKhanna.com

Radhika Khanna is an entrepreneur, yoga instructor, and fashion designer. She believes in living a fulfilling life and in following your dreams, which cannot be achieved if you ignore your body and health. She has taught modern and ancient yoga techniques to students all over the world. Radhika is a motivational speaker of much renown, an expert on psychosomatic diseases and positive thinking.

 

Whenever I feel lazy or sick i always say to myself:

1. Its my body and I must connect with it to make it feel better.

2. No matter what, just look good to feel good and you will be just fine.

3. The Universe controls every breath, my job is to surrender and breathe.

4. Healthy loves Happy, stay happy!

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Dashama Konah

 

Dashama.com

Dashama Konah is an internationally known Teacher, Author and Lifestyle Coach. She is the founder of the Global 30 Day Yoga Challenge, Perfect 10 Lifestyle online Community, Yoga for Foster Children and Pranashama Yoga School. After a tumultuous childhood facing many challenges, she has triumphed over adversity. She now uses her own story to empower and inspire others to work through their own obstacles by using the powerful yogic methods.

 

When I feel lazy, here are my top motivational tips to get to action:

1. I take a short time to journal, meditate or think about the reason WHY I want to accomplish the task I need to do. That always pushes me to take action even when I don’t feel like doing anything.

2. I go check out some of my inspirations online (usually FB, Youtube or IG) to see what they have been accomplishing or read a few inspiring words of encouragement. That usually kicks me into gear.

3. I give myself rewards. For example, if I know I need to get something done but feel lazy go do it, I will reward myself with a few hours at the beach, a massage or something that makes me feel good. Sometimes I even do this BEFORE the action I need to do, it really rejuvenates me and makes me want to get back to action. Most people reward themselves after the action is accomplished, which I also do, but often I find if I do it before, I am more energized so I don’t feel like the action I need to do is so much to handle. It puts things into perspective. However, if you are easily distracted, I recommend you reward yourself AFTER you accomplish the task, since it can take you off the train of thought to go to the beach or do something fun. For me that works but you may require the opposite order to maximize the results.

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Laura London

 

Laura London Fitness

Laura London is by trade a Board Certified Health Counselor (AADP), holistic weight loss coach & fitness specialist. But really, she is a fun loving free spirit, a wife of over 25 years, and a mom of 3, who decided to step out of her comfort zone and reinvent her health, body and life in her 40s. She has not looked back since.

 

1. Start with one small step to send you in the right direction. I love to turn my car into a mobile learning center and listen to a motivational CD.

2. Listen to your internal dialogue, you know “the little voices in your head”. Notice what is going on are you talking to yourself in a positive or negative voice. Just taking time to notice this, you can DECIDE to change it. You will start to feel better immediately. Find a positive quote or mantra, put it in your phone and set a reminder so it pops up during the day and keeps you motivated.

3. Do something just for yourself. Most of us are always busy doing something for others. Take a walk, join a yoga class, call a friend, get a massage. Making time for yourself because you are worth it will help to kick start you and get you moving forward. Slow down and make time.

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Andrea Metcalf

 

AndreaMetcalf.com

Andrea Metcalf is passionate about fitness, health and wellness and inspiring people to live their best lives. With over 30 years experience in the healthy lifestyle industry, she has become recognized by national media outlets as a trusted expert and adviser. She is a nationally requested speaker, the best-selling author of Naked Fitness, fitness DVD choreographer and trainer, and a force in the business media world.

 

You’ll feel better if you do it now, than you will in an hour if you don’t!

Why not?

Just put on your shoes and you’re halfway there!

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Christopher Stepien

 

Barefoot Rehab

Christopher Stepien is a chiropractic physician/strength coach whose goal is help people, empowering movement as the basis for health. He is educated in the logic of analysis, biomechanics of movement, fitness, nutrition, joint/muscle manual therapy, and mental beliefs/behaviors. Christopher is focused on individuals who have lost hope and been through various fields to find an answer without success, and showing people that they don’t have to suffer is his inspiration.

 

 

  1. Successful people do it anyway. I want to be successful, so I do it.
  2. Deathbed Meditation: When I have choices to make, I picture myself on my deathbed, having lived a certain life, with my family all around me. If the action I’m delaying must be done to create that life, I do it.
  3. I put my hand on my heart, breathe into it, and let my heart decide what I should be doing.

 

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Lifestyle & How-To

Jeremy Anderberg

 

The Art of Manliness

Jeremy Anderberg is a lucky husband and father, hungry learner, voracious reader, devoted coffee drinker, and craft beer enthusiast. He is the managing editor at The Art of Manliness. Originally from the Midwest, he now calls Denver home.

 

1) Just start. When I’m feeling lazy, any task feels too big, until I take the very first small step. Rather than focusing on writing an entire 2,000 word article, I try to write one sentence. From there, the tap is usually opened, and I can keep going. Rather than executing an entire project, I just send one email. All of a sudden, things don’t seem so intimidating.

2) Remember that your job depends on it. Even though my work is largely self-directed, there are still things that need to get done day in and day out. If I worked in any other setting — be it corporate or blue collar — could I get away with being lazy? Certainly not! Sometimes you just have to do the things that aren’t fun because of the simple reality that your job and livelihood rely on it.

3) Change something small in your environment. I’m a big believer that our environment can have a big impact on our motivation/inspiration. Take a few minutes to change something up: clean up a messy desk, drive to Starbucks, light a scented candle and meditate for a couple minutes. The change in mood and environment may very well kick your laziness into action; it often does for me!

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Sumitha Bhandarkar

 

A Fine Parent

Sumitha is the blogger behind afineparent.com and invites you to come take a look at the unique parent-child journal she has designed for positive, intentional parents. Connected Hearts Journal is a keepsake memory book you put together with your kids and in the process you connect, have conversations, teach life lessons, build up self-esteem, instill gratitude and so much more! Click here to find out more.

 

1. Tell myself to push myself just a little more and then I can take a break — this is very helpful when trying to get past a short-term bout of laziness

2. Remember the “why” I need to something — this is great to get past a stronger case of laziness attack

3. Give myself permission to be lazy and thoroughly enjoy it — this charges me up to rest my body and brain and get back in the game fresh and full of energy

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Antonio Centeno

 

Real Men Real Style

Antonio Centeno founded Real Men Real Style soon after starting ATailoredSuit.com. In an early effort to make my company more scalable, he tried to head off questions he knew future clients would have by building an online library about how to properly wear suits, dress shirts, sports jackets, and other professional clothes. RMRS has built a loyal following due to its solid authoritative content that is both detailed and clearly laid out.

 

3 Tips I would use when I feel lazy would be:

1. Reward yourself frequently and make sure that your rewards are lined up with your goals.

2. Gamification. It’s much easier to do things you don’t want to do when you add some fun to it. Making it into a game adds some challenge and makes it a lot more interesting.

3. Leverage partner and community support. Have someone or a group of people that can hold you accountable and inspire you. Sometimes all we need is someone telling us to get off the couch and do something!

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Dave Bouskill & Debra Corbeil

 

The Planet D

Dave and Deb are well-known travel personalities in both online and mainstream media.

Their highly acclaimed website, The Planet D, won back to back Gold Medals for Best Travel Blog by the Society of American Travel Writers (2014/2015) and Gold for Best Travel Blog and Online Excellence in Travel at the 2015 North American Travel Journalist Awards. They’ve travelled to more than 100 countries on all 7 continents.

 

When I’m feeling lazy, I don’t force the work. I prefer to get away away for a bit. Go for a walk, go for a drive, or just get out of the house and do something to get some energy and to give your mind a break.

If I need a bit of pep, I sit down and make a list. I do it the old fashioned way, on a note pad and just start putting down my thoughts about what needs to be done and organize it in the order of importance.

I also start with the little things. If I have a lot of work to do and I feel overwhelmed, I start with tasks that are quick and easy to do. Once you can check off a few things on the list you feel motivated and ready to work.

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Chelsea Dinsmore

 

Live Your Legend

Chelsea Dinsmore is the owner and Chief Inspiration Officer of Live Your Legend, a community whose mission is to change the world by helping people find their passion and build a career around the work that only they are capable of doing. Live Your Legend hosts monthly in person meetups in over 200 cities across nearly 60 countries, focused on creating in-person connections with like-minded living legends.

 

1. Prioritize a Few Important Items

Every Monday morning, I spend about an hour doing my weekly planning. Some might think of this as an hour wasted since I’m not really doing “work” but I couldn’t disagree more. I think this weekly planning process is the single biggest thing that helps me manage the many different things I have on my plate without constantly spinning in circles (literally and emotionally). At the beginning of the week, I answer the question, “What are the three things that MUST get done this week?” They may not always the be things I want to do… but they are the things that are seriously important in moving the needle forward for what I am working on or moving me closer to my goals.

2. Do something that matters

Sounds cliche, I know… But if you spend your time doing things that matter to you, you won’t want or need a distraction. I get lost in what I do for hours, so much so that at times, I have to schedule it in my calendar to eat! When you find the things that fire you up, you won’t want to distract yourself with trivial tasks because you will be so aligned with what you are doing. And when you come from that place, even if and when you feel ‘lazy’ it is nothing that a good song can’t fix!

3. Celebrate The Small Things!

I think this is a lost art. And I am it’s greatest cheerleader!

Celebrating the small things is a way of life for me, and why it is part of my weekly planning process. Every week I review my written journal where I have noted the big and the small things that mattered to me – the nice email I got, the special moment I had with a friend, the beautiful sunset I saw, the things I accomplished, the lessons I learned, the people I met, etc. Not only do I get to relive these beautiful moments instead of just letting them pass by, but I also get to truly see how far I have come. It is easy to get caught up in all that you have to do, but to stay motivated, it helps to stop, reflect and appreciate all you have actually done instead of only focusing on all the things you have to do.

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Vanessa Van Edwards

 

Science of People

Vanessa Van Edwards studies, hacks, and writes about human behavior at Science of People. As a recovering boring person, her goal is to help her readers become more powerful, charismatic, attractive and influential.

 

1. I make a decision–any decision, like what we are having for dinner or a color change on a button on the website. Research shows decisions help spur accomplishment and motivation. I think it works.

2. I watch amazing videos to recharge my brain. I like this list of 10 Short Videos to Recharge You.

3. I embrace the laziness. Sometimes that’s your bodies way of telling you to chill out.

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Whitson Gordon

 

How-To Geek

Whitson Gordon is a writer and editor currently based in San Diego, California. He is the editor-in-chief of How-To Geek, having previously been editor-in-chief of Lifehacker, as well as a contributor to Macworld, Wired, and other publications.

 

 

  • Know your good hours, and work during them. We all have certain times of the day that we know we’re most productive. I’m a morning person, so I make sure I schedule my most important work for those first few hours of the day, when I know I’ll be an unstoppable productivity machine. The afternoon, when I’m feeling lazy, is when I stick the more “fun” or easy stuff that I don’t need as much motivation in the bank for. If you’re a night owl, you can obviously adjust this to your own situation.
  • Intersperse the tasks you have to do with the stuff you actually want to do. This tip comes from Jay Shirley, creator of productivity app The Daily Practice. Each day, he says, you should do at least one high-priority task you must do, one long-term task you feel you should do, and one task you want to do. Most people focus on the daily “must” tasks, neglecting their long-term goals (because those tasks aren’t urgent) and the projects that keeps them happy (because those tasks also aren’t urgent). Sometimes, it’s okay to put a “want” task ahead of a “must” task–working on something you genuinely enjoy can help you build up steam to tackle the less fun stuff.
  • Know what motivates you, and use it. Credit for this one somewhat goes to Gretchen Rubin ( hat tip to my alma matter Lifehacker): everyone has a personality type that lends itself to different sources of motivation. Some people are motivated by pleasing others, while some just have an inner drive to meet their own expectations. I fall into that latter category. That doesn’t mean I don’t get lazy sometimes–I do!–but I know how to “trick” that part of my brain. I guilt myself into working by putting my to-do list front and center on my lock screen, or keeping the work I need to do open in a bunch of browser tabs. If it’s constantly in front of my face, nagging me, I know I won’t be able to ignore it–I’ll have a burning need to get it done before I can be lazy. The more you know what strikes your motivation match, the more you can set up systems that fan that flame when it gets low.

 

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Chris Guillebeau

 

Art of Non-Conformity

Chris Guillebeau writes at the The Art of Non-Conformity and organizes the annualWorld Domination Summit. He’s the author of Born for This,The Happiness of PursuitThe $100 Startup, and The Art of Non-Conformity, and has traveled to every country in the world.

 

Not sure I have three tips … honestly for me I’m very motivated to create. I think the #1 tip for productivity and life in general is to do work you believe in. Everything gets much easier when that’s the case.

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Alan Henry

 

Lifehacker

Alan Henry is a writer, gamer, and the editor-in-chief of Lifehacker. He’s the person with one of everything, and thinks loyalty to a brand, gadget, or OS is for suckers. He previously covered tech news, gaming, mobile tech, and science for Ziff Davis, is a certified Project Manager, and before that an actual astrophysicist. He loves to cook and likes long walks on the beach at sunset.

 

Take a walk.

Take a rest.

Take inspiration from the greats.

It’s probably deceptively simple actually. Taking breaks is critical to the creative process, whether you’re creating busywork that your boss has demanded, or you’re creating art from your own ideas, so when the world pushes back at you or you’re not in the headspace to do work, sometimes the best thing to do is to get up and get out. Go see something interesting and different. Lay eyes on something you haven’t seen before, and move around a bit. Exercise, even light exercise, can be enough stimulation.

If that’s not working out for you, or not what you need, maybe you need a real break, like a vacation, or even a nap. Naps can drastically improve your productivity, and give you even a short-term boost to help you recharge, recover, and get back to doing great things. If you need more than a nap, don’t hesitate to take a vacation. Too many of us leave vacation days and hours on the table every year anyway.

Finally, I think taking inspiration is probably the most obvious. Finding people you look up to, whose work you admire, and following in their footsteps can help a lot! Just remember that they, like you, are human, and while you may hear only of their successes and triumphs, remember they they, like you, have their own pitfalls, weaknesses, quirks, and failures. If anything, that should inspire you even more.

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Lewis Howes

 

LewisHowes.com

Lewis Howes is the author of The School of Greatness. He is a lifestyle entrepreneur, business coach and keynote speaker. A former professional football player and two-sport All-American, he is a current USA Men’s National Handball Team athlete. Howes hosts The School of Greatness podcast and was recognized by President Obama as one of the top 100 entrepreneurs in the country under 30. He has been featured in The New York TimesPeopleMen’s HealthThe Today Show and other major media outlets.

 

 

  • Work out
  • Watch a motivational video
  • Reconnect to my vision

 

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Jeremy Kochis

 

Unstoppable Match

Jeremy Kochis is a dating and relationship expert who helps men meet and find their perfect match. He offers unique, time-tested dating strategies for single men on his site Unstoppable Match.

 

1. If you need to get something done and have the time but just not the willpower – get up and accomplish something small. Tidy your room, make a salad, send 1 email.

2. Mind and body are so closely tied. Low energy may be remedied by exercising a bit – 10 pushups, or even dance alone to 1 song you really love.

3. Find the smallest part of the next task you need to get done, and just commit to doing that. Chances are you’ll want to keep going. Like making that phone call, or Googling how to do the small thing you don’t know.

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Benny Lewis

 

Fluent in 3 Months

Benny Lewis, is fun-loving Irish guy, a full-time globe trotter and accomplished language learner.

Since 2003, he’s become a fluent and confident speaker of seven languages. He is the founder ofFluent in 3 Months, and international bestselling author of the book by the same name.

 

1. Implement “leechblocking” plugins/software to prevent you from losing time on websites that encourage laziness, especially during work hours. When you are your own boss, the temptation is to spend all day on Facebook or getting lost down the Wikipedia hole, so being blocked from doing that works wonders!

2. If distraction is still an issue, then start working based off the Pomodoro technique of doing 25 minute focused sessions with 5 minute breaks. Those little breaks may seem like time lost, but they actually are my “high intensity” distractions so that my work-time can be genuinely distraction free.

3. Having an accountability buddy, or being public about your work on social media, especially about milestones you need to reach, so you have that pressure to deliver. Make sure to have SMART goals!

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Anthony Metivier

 

Magnetic Memory Method

Anthony Metivier has taught as a professor, is the creator of the acclaimed Magnetic Memory Method and the author behind a dozen bestselling books on the topic of memory and language learning.

 

Laziness is an asset, your body’s way of telling you to take a rest. I do my best to listen and not feel guilty about a bit of procrastination.

Second, I journal my progress. Having a physical progress journal is a great memory device that keeps your goal constantly in mind. It also reminds you how much you’ve already done and how much is left to go. I find it motivating.

Third, conquer the morning, conquer the day. I have morning rituals that help me cover a lot of territory, as described here: http://www.magneticmemorymethod.com/mandarin-chinese-mnemonics/

I don’t have a boss and no one to hold my hand if I fall. That is the greatest tool for overcoming laziness I’ve ever encountered.

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Sean Ogle

 

Location Rebel

Sean Ogle is the Head Rebel at Location Rebel, and his purpose is to help you build a small business that gives you the freedom and flexibility to work from anywhere in the world.

 

1) Remember, this lifestyle is a privilege not a right. I’m extremely lucky. At any point everything could disappear and I could have to go back to working a day job. This is all the motivation I need to continue working hard, growing the business, and helping other people do the same things I’ve been fortunate enough to do.

2) Surround myself with the things I want. This could be going to a car dealership to look at my dream car, walking through the neighborhoods I would most like to own a house in, or hanging photos of my dream destinations in my office. Having the things I want most surrounding me, makes me more likely to actually get them.,

3) Go back to my “motivation” email folder. I have a folder with dozens of emails from readers, friends, or Location Rebel members that for one reason or another I’ve found motivating. Reviewing that on a regular basis helps serve as a great motivational reminder.

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Cory Ohlendorf

 

Valet Magazine

Cory Ohlendorf is the co-founder and editor in chief of the men’s style site ValetMag.com. His fashion and culture writing has appeared in the Washington Post, Men.Style.com, New York magazine, the Los Angeles Times and the Chicago Tribune.

 

Here are three things I do to motivate myself when I’m in a lull.

1. Window shopping. For my job, when I’m feeling uninspired, I head to the nearest independent men’s shop. I don’t have to buy anything, but I browse the racks and shelves while talking with the people working there or better yet, the store owner. I see beautiful design, discover new brands and talk with people who are genuinely excited and informed about what they’re doing.

2. Open a book. It can be any kind of book-a big, luxurious coffee table book, a personal memoir or a novel-cracking open a book gets my mental gears turning and introduces you to new ideas.

3. Scratch the itch. A former boss mentioned this a long time ago and it seems to work for me. You identify what’s keeping you from working (is there something else you’d rather be doing?) and you either isolate and remove the temptation or you give in, indulge to get it out of you system and then get down to work.

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Joel Runyon

 

Impossible

Impossible X

Paleo Meal Plans

Joel Runyon is the founder of Impossible X and blogger at IIMPOSSIBLE. He is also the founder of Paleo Meal Plans LLC. He is an athlete, endurance runner, businessman, and speaker. His TEDx talk has received over 215,000 views.

 

If you’re depending on motivation, you’re using the wrong fuel.

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Sven Raphael Schneider

 

Gentleman’s Gazette

Sven Raphael Schneider – Founder of the Gentleman’s Gazette the largest website for classic men’s clothing and Fort Belvedere quality accessories for gentlemen.

 

1. Writing a To Do list and prioritizing helps to get started with something meaningful.

2. Physical activity. For example, a set of pushups gets your heart rate going so you can tackle the tasks.

3. Be positive and think about all the good things that will happen when you achieve your goal.

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James Swanwick

 

JamesSwanwick.com

James Swanwick is an Australian-American investor and TV & podcast host based in Hollywood, California. Swanwick is the creator of the Swannies blue-light blocking glasses, 30 Day No Alcohol Challenge, and 47-Day Habit Hacker.

 

1. I say to myself two, three-word mantras: “Just do it. Do it now.” I don’t say, “Do it tomorrow.” I say, “Do it now.” There is power in now. When you use the word, “now”, it propels me into action.

2. I text or email a simple contract to a friend which says that I will pay him / her $500 on a set date if I do not complete the task I’m procrastinating on. This quickly moves me into action because I do not want to pay $500 unnecessarily.

3. I remind myself of Muhammed Ali’s famous quote: “I hated every minute of training, but I said, ‘Don’t quit. Suffer now and live the rest of your life as a champion.'” This quote gets me into an investor mindset. If I invest time and energy now, I achieve massive reward later.

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Tynan

 

Tynan.com

Tynan believes in making deliberate decisions and breaking away from the herd mentality. He likes learning new things, building habits, exploring the world, connecting with awesome people, and creating good work. He was chosen as one of Time Magazine’s top bloggers in 2013.

 

1. Think about the end result that the task is leading to and think about why you’re doing it. If you don’t care about the end result and don’t have a good reason to do it, maybe you should do something else.

2. Force yourself to get started. If you still want to quit after 15/30/45 minutes, you can. Lots of causes of laziness are rooted in feeling overwhelmed, but taking the first step can get you over that hump.

3. If you’re really too lazy to do what you should really be doing, at least do something else useful. Don’t use it as an excuse to do nothing.

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Dan Western

 

Wealthy Gorilla

Dan Western is an entrepreneur and self-development blogger. He is the founder and CEO of Wealthy Gorilla, a website built to help and inspire people in their journey to success in business and life. The site is an ever growing source of motivation, inspiration, knowledge and advice for people with aspirations and dreams in this world.

 

Whenever I have one of those days where I’m struggling, I remind myself of how my life was when I was travelling around the world, meeting tonnes of new people and just generally doing some awesome stuff! Back then I was supporting myself mostly through savings, but soon I’ll be back on the road making enough money online to support myself. In all seriousness, you just have to visualize what your life will be like when you start achieving your goals. That’ll motivate you like crazy!

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Scott H. Young

 

ScottHYoung.com

Scott H. Young writes prolifically on the science behind learning at ScottHYoung.com. His accomplishments include learning four languages in a year and finishing MIT’s 4-year computer science curriculum in 12 months (without taking classes).

 

1. Start small. Motivation is mostly momentum. If you can start, continuing is easy.

2. Do fewer things, but focus on it more.

3. Plan in advance. Good plans make for good commitments.

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Nutrition

Dietitian Cassie, RD, LD

 

DietitianCassie.com

Dietitian Cassie is the celebrity Registered, Licensed Dietitian, professional speaker, founder of Healthy Simple Life® and #1 International Best Selling Author. Dietitian Cassie has built a following of loyal fans by helping people with the root causes of their health issues–especially ones that healthcare practitioners often overlook.

 

1 – Remember your “Big Why.” The real reason why you wanted to make these changes in the first place. Write it down. Put it on post-it notes on your mirrors and refrigerator.

2 – Learn how to deal with setbacks. If you find yourself giving in during a moment of desperation, know how to deal with setbacks. You skip a meal. You down a soda. That “taste” of dessert turns into a binge. Everyone slips and it’s important to know how to get back on track instead of falling deeper and deeper into a pit hole. When you do fall, it’s important to have your next meal or snack, even though your instincts will tell you to skip it. When you skip, it’s more difficult to get back on track and sets you up for further failure as you continue down the roller-coaster of blood sugars spiking and dropping. Recognize your slip up, and move forward. Don’t let your mistakes define you!

3 – Get accountability. Whether it’s a family member, a close friend or a dietitian coach through our personal coaching program, research has shown time and time again that accountability works, and we all do better when we have a partner in crime supporting us. Tell someone what you want to accomplish and how you plan to stick with it. You could consider starting a food diary too; write down what you eat and drink and look for patterns so you can avoid any pitfalls.

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Heather Frey

 

SmashFit

Heather Frey is an entrepreneur, Fitness Strategist, clean eating advocate, trainer, writer, speaker, artist, and former Figure Competitor. Heather has worked with countless clients to create health and fitness strategies that work into their life; do-able, manageable plans that make sense so they can have lifelong fitness.

 

Since my expertise is in fitness, this is one of the biggest issues I work on with my clients… how to make yourself do something when you don’t really want to. Here’s my advice summed up.

1. Imagine how you’ll feel if you don’t hit the gym, or make it to your class.

Success isn’t one giant step, it’s lots and lots of small ones put together so every time you miss a step, it just means it’ll take you that much longer to hit your goal. Every singe step – a workout, a healthy meal, passing on junk food – means the faster you will get where you want to go!

2. Just do the first step, like get dressed for the gym, or at leasts put on your sneakers. If you’re dressed and ready, you’re more likely to go.

3. Lie to yourself, just a little. If you’re tired and don’t really feel like a big workout, tell yourself you’re just going to do a short one. Chances are, once you get moving, those endorphins kick in and you’ll get it all done. Because starting is the first step to finishing strong.

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Kris Gunnars

 

Authority Nutrition

Kris Gunnars is a nutrition researcher with a Bachelor’s degree in medicine. He has spent years reading books, blogs and scientific studies on nutrition. Evidence-based nutrition is his passion and he plans to devote his career to informing people about it. He stays fit by lifting weights, taking walks and eating real food.

 

1. Just get started – getting your foot out the door is often the hardest part.

2. Remember the “why” – think about your reasons for trying to be healthier and visualize them.

3. Make habits, which put willpower on autopilot.

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Melissa Hartwig

 

Whole30

Melissa Hartwig is the co-founder of Whole30 and New York Times best-selling author ofThe Whole30 and It Starts With Food andFood Freedom Forever. Her forthcoming book, The Whole30 Cookbook, is now available for preorder!

 

1. Break the task down into small chunks. Looking at a big-picture goal (getting in shape, eating healthier) can be overwhelming, so just focus on the very first thing you have to do (sign up at a gym, commit to the Whole30).

2. Just do something, even if you’re not sure where to begin. Writing an article, but having trouble with the introduction? Start in the middle or write the end first, and inertia will work in your favor.

3. Procrastinate with another task you’ve been procrastinating. (Tricky, right?) Don’t want to clean out your closet? Tell yourself you don’t have to if you pay those bills you’ve been meaning to pay. Accomplishing one task makes you feel so good, you’ll want to keep the momentum going.

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Chris Kresser

 

Kresser Institute

Chris Kresser, M.S., L.Ac is a globally recognized leader in the fields of ancestral health, Paleo nutrition, and functional and integrative medicine. He is the creator of ChrisKresser.com, one of the top 25 natural health sites in the world, and the author of the New York Times best seller, Your Personal Paleo Code (published in 2014 as The Paleo Cure). Chris was recently named by Greatist.com as one of the 100 most influential people in health and fitness, and his work is frequently cited in national publications such as Time, The Atlantic, and NPR, and on Dr. Oz and Fox & Friends, where he has appeared as a guest.

 

I rarely, if ever, feel lazy or unmotivated, because my work is closely aligned with my purpose and passion. If I have a “secret” to staying motivated, that’s it.

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Jamila René Lepore

 

No Nonsense Nutritionist

Jamila René Lepore, MS, RDN, is a Florida-based registered dietitian nutritionist and food scientist with a passion for food, nutrition and overall wellness. She focuses on a habit-based approach to healthy eating on her websiteNo Nonsense Nutritionist and through her free Healthy Habits Challenge.

 

Here are my tips:

– When it comes to exercise: There’s many times I’m too tired or would rather be doing something else. To get motivated, I simply put on my sneakers and workout clothes. There’s something about lacing up your sneaks that makes you want to be active.

– When it comes to my diet: I know during the week there will be moments when I just don’t feel like preparing a healthy meal. To avoid falling into the trap of turning to quick less-than-healthy options, I make sure my kitchen is always stocked with convenient pre-prepped foods. And if I don’t have time to make it home, there are a handful of restaurants I know I can turn to for a quick healthy meal.

 

  • When it comes to anything else in life (work, socializing, family time…): I stick with the “10 minute rule”. If I’m feeling lazy in something, I tell myself I only have to commit to 10 minutes. If I want to do something else after, than I can. But at least I committed to 10 minutes.

 

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Stephanie McKercher

 

Grateful Grazer

Stephanie McKercher, MS RDN, is a Colorado-based integrative registered dietitian nutritionist and creator of food and nutrition blog, The Grateful Grazer. On The Grateful Grazer, Stephanie shares healthy recipes and evidence-based nutrition tips. She also offers individualized nutrition coaching services to clients throughout the United States and partners with wellness-focused brands on nutrition communications, marketing, and recipe development.

 

1. I try to focus on activities that I enjoy, like cooking, hiking, and riding my bike. Healthy living is so much easier when I’m doing something fun.

2. I focus on eating whole foods and drinking lots of water to promote optimal energy levels.

3. I remember to rest when I need it and because sometimes it’s actually beneficial to be a little bit “lazy”.

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Sharon Palmer

 

SharonPalmer.com

Sharon Palmer, RDN, The Plant-Powered Dietitian, is a registered dietitian, plant-based and sustainability expert, and author of Plant-Powered for Life and the award-winning Plant-Powered Blog. She has written over 950 articles, and also serves as the editor of Environmental Nutrition and Nutrition Editor for Today’s Dietitian.

 

When I’m feeling lazy

1. I attack some moderately easy things that I enjoy doing first. That way I don’t feel unmotivated and dread plunging into a difficult topic. I always have a long list of “easier things” to do that I enjoy the most. Then I have an equally long list of “difficult things” to do that I dread. I find that if I’m not in the mood, I feel good about myself by getting things crossed off my list that are pleasurable. Then when I feel more motivated, I attack the more difficult things.

2. I get some exercise-which always boosts my energy levels. Even if I don’t feel like moving, just a brisk walk or run can make me feel ready to tackle just about anything.

3. I power up with a healthy snack, such as a handful of nuts or seeds, or a piece of fruit. That can give me a little break, as well as make me feel fueled to keep my brain and energy levels higher.

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Julie Upton

 

Appetite for Health

Julie Upton, MS, RD, CSSD is a registered dietitian, nutrition spokesperson, writer, author, sister, daughter, athlete, muscle confusion advocate and pro sports fanatic. She writes at Appetite for Health, a site dedicated to showing that healthy eating is delicious, satisfying and always possible-no matter the circumstances.

 

When I feel lazy, here’s what I do

1) Remind myself how much better I’ll feel after I go to the gym, trail run or whatever it is that I can’t seem to get enough ooomph to do.

2) I tell myself, if you still feel tired after 10 minutes into your workout, you can just stop. (I never do, once I get warmed up and get the blood flowing, I have the energy I need to push on.)

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Personal Development

Shawn Achor

 

Goodthink Inc.

Shawn Achor is a New York Times bestselling author of Before Happiness and The Happiness Advantage. He is the winner of over a dozen distinguished teaching awards at Harvard University where he delivered lectures on positive psychology in the most popular class at Harvard. Shawn has become one of the world’s leading experts on the connection between happiness and success.

 

 

If you feel lazy, show your brain how far you’ve come today. Make a checklist of things you need to do today, but also include a few things you’ve already accomplished so you can give your brain some wins.Our brain accelerates toward goals where we perceive progress.

If you feel lazy, call someone and tell them about your work. The greatest predictor of happiness is social connection, and when we feel that there is social meaning to our work, we feel rejuvenated and our brain releases extra resources.

When you feel lazy, stop and try to think of three successes you’ve had over the past month, big or small. Priming the brain with previous success reminds the brain that your behavior matters and helps activate the happiness advantage.

 

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James Altucher

 

JamesAltucher.com

James Altucher is an American hedge fund manager, entrepreneur, bestselling author, and podcaster. He has founded or cofounded more than 20 companies, including Reset Inc. and StockPickr. He has published eleven books, and is a frequent media contributor. USA Today named his book Choose Yourself one of the 12 Best Business Books of All Time.

 

 

A) GET CREATIVE MUSCLE GOING. I write down ten ideas about anything.

The idea muscle is a muscle like any other. It needs constant exercise or it will atrophy. If I write ten ideas down, maybe they sill get the juices flowing. Or maybe not but they will still make me a better idea producer.

B) DIVERSIFY

I always have 5 projects going on. Sometimes my brain just doesn’t feel working on a project. Or I encounter a problem I can’t solve so I go into brain freeze (i.e. lazy).

If I always have projects I can switch to there will be at least one project I find interesting and I will work on it.

More than 5 projects is too much, Not enough time to make the good.

C) PLAY

I simply leave. I’ll go bowling. Play tennis. Play air hockey, Go the park and play chess. This loosens up my brain. Then when I get home, I’m refreshed and I can see things through new eyes.

 

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Brendan Baker

 

Start of Happiness

Brendan Baker is Australia’s leading personal development blogger who helps people build and grow online businesses based on their passions. He is the founder of Start of HappinessLaunch Your Life Academy and Your First 1000 Subscribers.

 

I use various strategies. 3 of my most common strategies are:

1) Read over my goals (my goals include why they are important to me) and read my “Mental Uploads” – beliefs I upload into my brain.

2) Watch a TED talk

3) Do something completely different. Sometimes I just need to re-energise. By doing a completely different activity (eg, exercising, pegging my washing on the clothes line, calling a friend, meditating) this can give my mind a break and helps me get back on to the task in question quicker.

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Beth Bongar

 

Laughing Diva

Beth Bongar, the Laughing Diva, has fun for a living teaching people how to breathe and laugh, which is the simplest way she knows to move our immune systems and be healthier. She joined the circus at age 19 and became a professional clown. Now her mission is to teach YOU how to use the breath of HA for your health so that you can laugh your way to health and happiness any time you choose.

 

1. I Learn from trees. I smile and exhale and let it all go, just like the leaves in fall.

2. Every morning I breath in and smile…. I wiggle my toes and giggle, I am glad I woke up, because somewhere, someone didn’t .

3. I breathe in the excitement of life and I exhale the boring.

4. Breath in and spell out F—k U . That way stress does not kill you!

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Tim Brownson

 

A Daring Adventure

Tim Brownson is a Certified Life Coach, NLP Master Practitioner, Certified Hypnotherapist and Coach Trainer. He is also a published author in 7 different countries. Using his years of experience, he trains other Life Coaches at Coach the Life Coach.

 

1. I focus on my core values whenever I feel enthusiasm waning. Too many people become demotivated because they focus on the pain of what it is they need/want to do, rather than the reward of feeling like they have accomplished something of meaning and worth. When I remind myself of the big picture I naturally become more enthused.

2. I meditate. Even though this may seem somewhat contrary being that it doesn’t involve any physical effort, but I always feel more inspired and

3.I get off my ass and do as little as 3 or 4 minutes exercise like jumping jacks. Just a few minutes boosts endorphins, raises serotonin and increases motivation.

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Valorie Burton, MAPP, PCC

 

ValerieBurton.com

Valorie Burton, MAPP, PCC is founder of the Coaching and Positive Psychology (CaPP) Institute and best-selling author of 11 books, includingSuccessful Women Think Differently and Get Unstuck, Be Unstoppable. Visit her online at ValorieBurton.com.

 

1. If you’re feeling “lazy” because you’re burned out, it’s a sign you need a break. Give yourself permission to be lazy, but give it a deadline. It may just be the rest your brain needs in order to replenish your energy and get motivated again.

2. Other times laziness is really boredom. Boredom happens when the challenge in front of you is too easy for your skill level. Revitalize your goal. Choose something that excites and challenges you. Take on a task that requires you to learn something new. Such moves will energize and inspire ou.

3. If you’re just textbook lazy, the answer is discipline. It doesn’t sound sexy, but it works. Discipline trumps talent when it comes to success. So refuse to wait until you “feel” like doing something and just do it. Your feelings will catch up.

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Aymee Coget, PhD

 

Happiness for HumanKIND

Dr. Aymee Coget (pronounced Co jjayy) is a sustainable happiness expert and the CEO of Happiness for HumanKIND. In 1996, Dr. Aymee made the decision to devote her entire life to helping millions of people live happier lives. Since then she has established a proprietary happiness increase formula which she teaches to individuals, families, groups and organizations. She has been a contributor for many mainstream media outlets for positive psychology. For information about the science based happiness increase programs visit www.happinessforhumanKIND.com

 

1- Remember the big picture

2- Meditate

3- Drink water

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Henrik Edberg

 

Positivity Blog

Henrik Edberg lives on the west coast of Sweden. Since 2006 he’s written practical articles and newsletters about simplifying life, social skills, self-esteem, reducing stress and becoming happier. He is the author of 6 courses and guides.

 

1. I shut down the escape routes temporarily.

If I deactivate or make my escape routes/procrastination traps less easy to get to I can get back on track.

So for me that may mean to unplug my computer from the internet and putting my smart phone in silent mode and putting it at the other end of our home.

2. I find motivation from an outside source.

This could be music that adds positivity or motivation to my day and gives me an emotional kick in the butt. Or it could be to listen for about 20 minutes to a podcast that motivates me (an example of that is the podcast by Tim Ferriss).

3. I make moving forward and taking action easy on myself.

The hardest thing is often to simply get started.

So I make that as easy as I can to reduce the inner resistance and to actually take action. I start with just taking a small – or a very small – step forward. And that could look something like this:

– Go out running for only 3 minutes.

– Wash 2 plates and a fork from the dirty dishes.

– Write just half a page on that newsletter I’ve been procrastinating on.

But it rarely stops there. If I just get started and get over that first mental hurdle then I usually keep going and make a real dent in the task or I go on until it is done.

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Hal Elrod

 

HalElrod.com

Hal Elrod is one of the highest-rated keynote speakers in America, #1 best-selling author of one of the highest rated books in the world (with over 1,500+ five-star Amazon reviews), The Miracle Morning, and creator of The Miracle Morning book series. He is also a Hall of Fame business achiever, ultra-marathon runner (that’s 52 consecutive miles), host of the top ratedAchieve Your Goals podcast, creator of the Best Year Ever [Blueprint] live event, and grateful husband & father of two.

 

 

  1. Embrace the Laziness – As much as we all think we’d like to be motivated 24/7, I’ve found that resting and recharging is vital to sustaining motivation and optimum performance, over the long term. So, I strive to pay attention and be highly aware of my own motivational rhythms — the times of day when I feel motivated, and the times of day when I just need to take a break. Whether that means going for a walk, taking a quick nap, unless I have a pressing deadline (in which case I implement tip 2 and 3), I’ve learned that motivation often comes in waves, and it’s best to ride the waves, rather than force it.
  2. Move Your Way Into Motivation – My go-to plan of attack, when I’m feeling unmotivated (or lazy), is 60-second of jumping jacks. Motion generates energy, and energy is the foundation of motivation. When your energy level is high, the motivation you need is available on-demand. However, when your energy levels are low, good luck getting yourself motivated. And unfortunately, our body doesn’t generate energy when we’re laying in bed, or sitting around on the couch “wishing” we had more energy. We must actually put our body into situations that require energy, and our bodies will always generate the energy necessary to need the demands of any situation. So, the fastest (healthy) way to increase your energy is to move your body, to elevate your heart rate and pump oxygen throughout your body, including your brain.
  3. Start Your Day with a Miracle Morning – How we start our day sets the context, our mindset, and our motivation for the rest of the day. If we start the day by hitting the snooze button (which in essence is resisting our day and life itself), and we procrastinate until the last possible moment before we get out of bed, we are starting the day with an undisciplined, unfocused morning, which leads to undisciplined, unfocused days. However, when we wake up earlier than we “have to” wake up, and dedicate the first part of our day to proven personal development practices (See The Miracle Morning: S.A.V.E.R.S. – Silence, Affirmations, Visualization, Exercise, Reading, Scribing), we will not only start off everyday with an extraordinary level of motivation, but we will inevitably gain the knowledge and success traits that will enable us to create.

 

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Erin Falconer

 

Pick the Brain

Erin Falconer is the President and Co-Founder of LEAFtv-a video ecommerce lifestyle brand for the Millennial generation. She is also the Editor in Chief and Co-Owner of the self-improvement site PickTheBrain.com, where she finds content that will motivate, inspire and instruct readers best, as well as help them to make the changes that matter most in their lives.

 

1. 4-minute plank

just try it! it immediately engages both your mind + core. Afterwards (my record is 3:10) the blood is flowing and my energy spikes!

2. Music

My go-to any time I need a shift in energy. Music can calm me down or pump me up! When I’m looking for a pick-me-up, it’s headset in, volume up.

3. Visualization.

The feeling of accomplishment and relief that comes after completing a task that you’re dreading is so powerful – at least for me. If I’m really lazy to do something, I’ll sit in silence and visualize how happy and free I’ll feel once I’m done – and that’s usually all of the motivation I need to get the task done!

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Ann Hermes

 

Lifehack.org

Ann Hermes is a Freelance Creative Writer, Copy-editor, Translator and Graphic Designer based in Indonesia. She is on the editorial team at Lifehack.org.

 

When I feel lazy, I will be lazy for a while and tend to procrastinate my to-do-list. I think being lazy is OK as long as we know the limit. I always make sure to set the deadline or make goals/targets because I think our to-do-list (by this I mean important things we must finish due to our responsibility) should be finished in the end. So when I feel lazy, I’ll just be lazy; doing all the things I want to do that make me happy while gathering my motivation again.

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Mary Jaksch

 

Write to Done

A-List Blogging

Goodlife Zen

Mary Jaksch is best known for her exceptional training for writers at WritetoDone.com. Grab a copy of her free reportHow to Create an Irresistible Lead Magnet in Less Than 5 Hours. In her “spare” time, Mary’s also the brains behind AlistBlogging.net. and GoodlifeZEN.com, a Zen Master, a mother, and a 5th Degree Black Belt. Join her FREE online training, 5 Powerful Online Writing Strategies.

 

As everyone knows, it’s particularly difficult to rustle up motivation when you feel tired, overwhelmed, or stressed. These are the times when doing something extra beside your everyday tasks, like going for a run, helping others, being creative, or cranking out some more content can feel like it’s just too much.

The key to feeling motivated at such times is to change your mindset. Because, if you feel like grumbling and think you deserve a rest instead of taking up a challenging activity, it will be difficult for you to take action.

What works for me is a two-part strategy. Part #1 is to notice the voices in my head and to end each negative thought with, “…but it’s a privilege!” This puts me into a positive frame of mind. Part #2 is to immediately take a small step toward the action I’m resisting. For example, I might put on running clothes or go to my desk and open my writing software. With this two-part strategy, I can combat flagging motivation, lift my spirits, and take action.

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Joanna Jast

 

Shapeshifters Club

Joanna Jast helps career changers, entrepreneurs and freelancers accelerate their learning and personal change so they can adapt faster to the new environment. If you want to learn more about creating new habits faster, check her Hack Your Habits site and start improving your habits today.

 

3 tricks I use to ‘motivate’ myself when I feel lazy

 

Let me get this straight from the start: I’m lazy by nature, and I have an Instant Gratification Monkey living in my brain. But at the same time, I love the sense of fulfilment that comes from achieving my goals.

Obviously, most worthy goals are long term, and this is where my problem lies. I not only have my natural laziness to overcome, but also the Instant Gratification Monkey to fight.

Over the years, I figured out that the best way to get myself do things I need to do in order to achieve my goals is to outsmart those two.

Here is what I do:



1. ‘Just do this little thing for 2 minutes’ to get started

The first step is the hardest, so when I feel lazy and/or overwhelmed by the task I use this little trick to get myself under way quickly. I start with the easiest/fastest part of the task and tell myself I’ll do it only for 2 minutes ‘and then I’ll see’. More often than not, after those 2 min I just keep going.



2. Breaks and rewards to keep going

I divide my workload into manageable chunks, depending on the task and how badly lazy I feel. I take breaks more frequently than usually and have lots of little rewards to keep going.

Sometimes, on a really bad day, I can’t manage more than 10- 15 minutes of sustained work at the time, but that’s ok as long as I keep the breaks really short (1-3 min). After all, I can achieve much more in those 10 min bursts of activity than if I wasn’t doing anything at all.



3. Systems to outsmart my natural laziness and my Instant Gratification Monkey

This is my biggest ‘secret to success’. When I feel motivated and ‘pumped’ about new goal, I use this energy to create a system that will keep me working on the goal.

My systems are based on my weaknesses, previous failures and generally assume the worst-case scenario. I often go with the line of least resistance and make it so easy I cannot not do it, and create default options, so I don’t have any other choices. This way, they get me working even when I feel unmotivated, tired and super-lazy.

My smart systems are what makes me get up at 5am every morning, run 3 times per week, get work done on time, constantly learn new stuff, write and read books and articles, juggle a full time job, a business, a couple of side projects and – a family.

To learn more about my system to hack habits and outsmart poor motivation and weak willpower – click here.

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Sylviane Nuccio

 

Generate More Money

Sylviane Nuccio is a life coach and copywriter. As a life coach, she transforms people’s lives with painful emotions that led them to negative experiences which keep them from fulfilling their potentials and dreams. As a Copywriter she improves her clients experience to attract more clients through their blog content and online articles.

 

1) Knowing my goal – my WHY. Ultimately, my life’s propose. This is a great motivator for anyone who wants to keep going and accomplish their daily goals.

2) Taking one task at the time, trying to concentrate on that one task ONLY. When you’re driving your car at night your headlights allow you to see only a few yards ahead of you, yet this is enough to go from point A to point B. It’s the same thing with the daily tasks you have to accomplish to grow your business, your project, your life. Take one step at the time, and don’t stress out about tomorrow.

3) Meditate. Meditation is an excellent exercise that I use on a daily basis to tease my motivation. Meditation affects your subconscious – this part of you where all motivation and lack thereof comes from. So shaping your subconscious mind to be motivated (with specific meditation exercises) will bring about amazing results.

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Erin Pavlina

 

ErinPavlina.com

Erin Pavlina is a world renowned intuitive counselor who uses her psychic abilities to help her clients achieve what they desire in the realm of career, relationships, finances, health, spirituality, and more. She has written more than 800 articles you can read for free on her blogHer book on Astral Projection has been read by thousands of people.

 

Three ways I motivate myself when I feel lazy:

I will timebox a task that I don’t particularly feel like doing. So I’ll say to myself, “Just work on this for 20 minutes, that’s all, then stop.” Usually when I do this I end up working on the task much longer, but I’ve given myself permission to stop after 20 minutes if I don’t feel like doing it any more.

Another method I use is chunking a huge task into small bite size pieces. Instead of working on a “big project” which can sometimes feel overwhelming, I will pick one small task that will get me further than I was when I started. Otherwise, big projects can overwhelm me and make me push them to the back burner too long.

And lastly, I will put it in my appointment book. If I carve out time in advance for a certain task, I will work on that task because I never break an appointment. It also sets my mind at ease to look at my appointments for the week and know that something important is scheduled and going to get done.

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Rhiannon Rees

 

RhiannonR.com

Rhiannon Rees is renowned as one of the world’s best self-development experts, referred to as Australia’s answer to US self-help guru Dr. Wayne Dyer. The best-selling success of her first book, “How to Climb Mount Everest in Sandals – The courage to live an ordinary life”, (the startling tale of her own life-journey) has lead to the imminent release of her second book, out in 2015.

Renowned as one the world’s best self development experts, and ranked 4th Best Business Coach in the World 2010, Rhiannon has worked with stars including the Spice Girls, X-Files and Grey’s Anatomy and Private Practice cast members. She is the author of the bestseller How to Climb Mount Everest in Sandals.

 

Daily Consciousness.

Belief

Routine.

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Dragos Roua

 

DragosRoua.com

Dragos Roua is a serial online entrepreneur, personal development fanatic, blogger, father, ultramarathoner, and tanguero. He has more than 15 years experience in starting, managing and upgrading (selling) companies, mainly in online publishing. He believes happiness is a process, not a goal.

 

1. Motivation is fantastic for starting things, moves energies around but it’s terrible at long term commitments – the faster the start, the sooner motivation ends.

2. So, when I set a specific, long-term goal, I just use motivation to start habits that will support me long-term.

3. I just rely on habits until I reach a plateau, then get back to number 1.

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Sid Savara

 

SidSavara.com

Sid Savara created The Action Solution andThe Outsource Solution, and writes on personal development at SidSavara.com. He’s lived around the world and writes software in his free time.

 

 

  1. Get up and get a glass of water. What’s the hardest part about keeping a regular weight lifting routine? Often it’s just getting your workout clothes on and heading to the gym. It’s just breaking that inertia that is keeping you sitting on your couch or watching TV or browsing facebook. So I get up and get a glass of water and now I’m not “doing” anything anymore – so it’s a little easier for me to get on to the “next thing” – whether that’s going to the gym, writing, or working on a personal project.
  2. Make it a routine. It’s easier to floss every day than it is to floss every few days – why? Because I don’t floss when I “feel like it” – I floss every day, as part of a routine. So if I feel lazy, I try to start combining productive things into a routine. Like yoga and stretching every evening at the same time – that routine makes it harder for me to be lazy, because it’s no longer sometime I need to motivate myself to do – it’s just something I do.
  3. Use motivational stories, quotes and posters. When I come across stories and quotes that motivate me, I print them out and stick them on my wall. Sure, it’s a short term motivational boost – but then again, most times it’s just short term laziness holding me back! One of my favorites that I have up on my wall is – “We are what we repeatedly do. Excellence then is not an act but a habit.” – Aristotle

 

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Luminita Saviuc

 

PurposeFairy.com

Luminita Savuic is Founder and Blogger-in-Chief at Purpose Fairy, home of the most viral personal development article on the Internet, 15 Things You Should Give Up To Be Happy. As an enthusiastic student of the arts, psychology, and spirituality, she take great pleasure in shining light on life’s hidden truths, the paradoxes that both stare us in the face and hide from us in unison, as they silently shape our every waking moment.

 

1. Accept what is.

There is a beautiful verse in the Tao Te Ching that goes like this: ” There is a time for being ahead, a time for being behind; a time for being in motion, a time for being at rest; a time for being vigorous, a time for being exhausted; a time for being safe, a time for being in danger. The Master sees things as they are, without trying to control them. She lets them go their own way, and resides at the center of the circle.” And I have learned this to be true. We are part of nature, and just as nature needs to be restored, renewed and rejuvenated, so do we.

There will be moments in your life when you will feel creative, productive and full of life and energy. But there will also be times when your mind, body and soul will be in great need of rest. And when that happens, it’s very important to allow yourself to feel whatever you are feeling without any judgment….To accept what is and allow yourself to just be.

2. Take time to reconnect with yourself.

It’s so important to take the time to reconnect with yourself. To do things that make you feel a deep sense of joy, peace and gratitude – for life, for who you are, and for all that life has to offer you. To go outside in nature and notice the beauty that’s present all around you. By doing so, you will take your mind off of the things that need to be done, and you will relax yourself into life, into beauty, into creativity, and into all that is life giving. And when you will get back to your work and what needs to be done, chances are that you will feel a lot more creative and excited about everything.

3. Be honest with yourself.

One of the many valuable lessons I have learned from life is that there is more to life than what meets to eye. And that there is always a deeper reason behind all that we are feeling and all that we are experiencing.

Deep down inside, you know the reason behind your feelings, and even though you might label the behavior as “laziness”, chances are that there is more to it than just that. So dare to ask yourself why you are feeling the way you do. Because if you are honest with yourself, you will eventually discover the root cause of the so called “laziness” and you will know what to do from there.

BONUS: No matter what happens and no matter how long you will feel like you don’t want to do the things you think you should be doing, it’s very important to remind yourself that you are a Human BEing and not a Human DOing. And your value and self-worth are not determined by what you do and how much of it you do.

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Steve Scott

 

Develop Good Habits

Steve Scott is an author, blogger and speaker. He writes about self-help, personal development, habit change and online publishing. He currently writes for developgoodhabits.com as well as his own self-published books. His thoughts on habit change and self-improvement are simple and expressed in the tagline of his webpage, “Build a better life. One habit at a time.”

 

Focus on a single step.

Lengthy to do lists will often make you feel like burying your head in the sand and doing anything but the task you need to do.

The answer to this is to make a firm commitment to complete a single step of the task. When the task in front of you seems smaller it is easier to commit even if you feel lazy. Often the largest barrier to getting things done is getting started. Once you finish the single step of the larger task, you will often find that you actually want to keep going.

Review your goals.

If you want to achieve great things, having concrete goals is a must. Goals will provide direction and keep you on track.

But goals can do more than that. On those lazy days when you really don’t feel like working, you can review your goals. Remind yourself of what you want to achieve and why you want to achieve it. Looking at the big picture like this can help you overcome a bit of procrastination on those lazy days.

Make it routine.

Often people have “bad days” because they rely on motivation to get things done. The problem is that motivation is fleeting. When you make a task routine you go beyond motivation. You commit to doing an action regardless of how you feel. Lazy, depressed, super-busy: it doesn’t matter. You commit to doing that task regardless.

By making a task something that is done every day without fail, after a couple of months it becomes part of your life and you do not need motivation to get it done. As Nike says, you, “just do it”.

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Laura and Mark Tong

 

PositivelyHappy.me

Laura and Mark Tong have been on their own personal journey to find happiness for over a decade. They study awesome people from around the world to bring to light the habits and actions that allow them to lead happy lives and stay positive when life gets tough. Everything they know and learn they then share on PositivelyHappy.me so you can shortcut your way to happiness starting right now.

 

Here’s what gets us up and at it when we feel like lolling about 

1. Remembering the promises we made. We said we do that thing by a certain time and letting others down is a No NO.

2. Setting a time limit on finishing whatever needs doing. And building in a protected window of ‘lazy time’ afterwards as a reward.

3. Revisiting the very reason we do what we do. Remembering our aim and the joy it gives us.

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Jay White

 

Dumb Little Man

Jay White is the pen name of the founder of Dumb Little Man, a site with articles on a countless number of personal development topics. To date, over 17 million people have stopped by Dumb Little Man.

 

1. Review my goals and ask myself: Am I on target for the goals I’ve set

2. Talk to productive and energetic friends to have myself motivated (and do the same to them when they feel lazy)

3. Workout or simply go somewhere (to recharge and feel refreshing)

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Kendra Wright

 

HeyKendra.com

Kendra Wright is a blogger, writer, speaker and location independent entrepreneur. Since creating the Year Of Fear Project in 2013, she has completed over 700 self-assigned comfort zone challenges. Kendra specializes in teaching others how to break through fear and uncertainty, productivity slumps, and create better work-life balance (without abandoning the inner hustle). Get 100 of her simple and unconventional comfort zone challenges here.

 

 

  1. Race the clock: I challenge myself for a set time period. How much can I move this project forward in 30 minutes or 1 hour? Knowing that I’m only going to be suffering through it for a set time gives me a finish line before I start. I shut all distractions out, put my phone out of sight, set a timer, and stretch the hustle muscle.
  2. Leverage location changes: if I have a particular task I need to knock out but feel less than jazzed to do it, I may head to a local coffee shop or co-working space and tell myself… I’m not leaving until X is done. Sometimes we just need an energy shift, and our environment can do that. (Shout out to my friend Angel Chernoff for this fab strategy).
  3. Eat your vegetables (aka. find a carrot): like a carrot on the end of stick, when I hit sticking points in projects or tasks (esp really hard ones)… I immediately decide on a reward I can have after completing it. This works especially well with large projects.

For example, when I was in the trenches of launching my course Facing Fear earlier this year I decided as soon as the launch ended I was taking an entire week of work with no scheduled productivity. Sometimes you need a week in bed with no pants and bingeing on Youtube to get you through the hard times. In other words, use your guilty pleasures to your advantage.

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Psychology & Productivity

Chris Bailey

 

A Life of Productivity

Chris Bailey’s year-long productivity experiment quickly expanded to the popular blog A Life of Productivity. Chris is a speaker, consultant, and author of The Productivity Project, a bestselling book teaching the lessons he’s learned through his experiments and research.

 

Work slower: This is my favorite bit of counterintuitive advice. When I’m feeling lazy, I make sure that I don’t push myself to work too hard-this way I’ll be motivated to keep working, and enjoy myself in the process!

Shut off distractions: My mind craves distractions when I’m lazy, so I also make sure to shut off as many distractions as I possibly can-and often disconnect from the internet when I’m working on something that requires more focus.

Invest in my energy: Whenever I’m feeling lazy, I ask myself whether I need to take a step back to invest in my energy-like by eating cleaner, exercising more, getting more social interaction, or getting a proper amount of sleep. Energy is the fuel we burn over the course of the day in order to be productive-and it’s essential that we cultivate our energy levels throughout the day!

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Peter Banerjea

 

SuccessIsWhat

Peter Banerjea is co-founder of SuccessIsWhat, a blog on productivity and leadership. He has coached several entrepreneurs and leaders from Fortune 500 companies to become more productive and achieve their goals faster. Peter is also the author of the free ebook Productivity Secrets of 7 Billionaires You Can Put into Action Right Now.

 

Here are three things that work wonders for me

1. Getting Physical

Our bodies have an astonishing influence on our mood. Addressing our physical state is the easiest way to pump up our motivation. Doing a few pushups or a practicing a quick round of shadow boxing gives me a rush of adrenaline and increases my aggression levels – and hence my motivation.

2. Power Song

Music has the power to magically lift your mood. Think ‘Rocky’ or ‘Superman’ soundtracks or anything else that gets you moving. Personally I love Bon Jovi’s ‘It’s my life’. I either listen to it or sing it aloud.

3. Borrow some Energy

I know that motivation is contagious. It’s tough to feel down when you are speaking to someone who has really high levels of energy. I just pick up the phone and call a friend or colleague who’s doing really well. 10 minutes of hearing about their success stories is all it takes me to get charged up and get back to work!

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Brittany Bullen

 

NerdyGirl

Brittany Bullen owns NerdyGirl.co, a company that helps business owners find great freelancers (translation: she gets to geek out about marketing all day long). She specializes in saving people’s time, money and sanity by helping them do the best things first. Check out her free mini-course, Reclaim Your Sanity in 7 Days!

 

1. Everybody needs to get that some of the best things for you are the things most of us almost NEVER feel motivated to do, like wake up early, exercise, eat right, all that stuff. Discipline trumps motivation any day of the week.

2. The great thing about working remotely is that if I really feel lazy, I can rock out to it! Netflix binge in the middle of the day? Hey, why not? When you work like crazy all the time, it can be really gratifying to give yourself unconventional breaks “just because”.

3. Willpower is like a muscle. When it’s weak, it doesn’t work as well. That’s why it pays to know what times of the day your willpower is at its highest and plan to do the toughest stuff during that time. For example, 11am is the time I work out, because I know my “lazy self” is going to take over in the mornings in the evenings, so I reserve that time for doing work I find the most fun.

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Alexandra Cavoulacos

 

The Muse

Alex Cavoulacos is the co-founder and Chief Operating Officer of The Muse, the most trusted and beloved career destination for Millennials and beyond, helping over 50 million people every year advance in their careers. Alex has spoken on WNYC and at SxSW, and was named one of INC’s 15 Women to Watch in Tech and TIME’s 140 Best Twitter Feeds of 2014. She is a frequent keynote on productivity and entrepreneurship. Prior to founding The Muse, Alex was a management consultant at McKinsey & Company. She graduated from Yale University, and is an alumna of YCombinator. Follow her @acav.

 

When I feel lazy, there are 3 things that work to get me motivated. First, aligning work with energy is a must: I have a list of “lazy work”, aka the kind of work that can be done with the TV on in the background, and is a bit more mindless. Second, I’ll take a break to get out of that mindset if I need to focus, going for a walk or calling a friend before jumping in. Finally, if all else fails, I bribe myself with a reward, such as “when this presentation is done, I’ll get that extra rich hot chocolate from around the corner”.

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Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi

 

Claremont Graduate University

Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi is one of the world’s foremost researchers on positive psychology. He recognised and named the psychological concept of flow, a highly focused mental state, and authored the groundbreaking book of the same name. He is the Distinguished Professor of Psychology and Management at Claremont Graduate University.

 

I usually take a few seconds to think: what difference will it make, in terms of eternity and the future of the universe, if a) I hustle about and do what I am supposed to do, or b) if I just lay back and take it easy?

If the answer is “no difference” then I take the b) option.

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B.J. Fogg

 

BJFogg.com

Dr. BJ Fogg directs the Persuasive Tech Lab at Stanford University. A psychologist and innovator, he devotes half of his time to industry projects. His work empowers people to think clearly about the psychology of persuasion – and then to convert those insights into real-world outcomes. He is the author of Persuasive Technology: Using Computers to Change What We Think and Do, a book that explains how computers can motivate and influence people. Fortune Magazine selected BJ Fogg as one of the “10 New Gurus You Should Know”.

 

I have one tip when motivation is sagging:

Just take the next step.

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Neen James

 

NeenJames.com

Neen James, MBA CSP, is an Aussie productivity thought leader, best known for her engaging keynotes that have educated and entertained audiences with real-world strategies that apply in all roles at work and in life. With a background in learning and development and managing large teams at various corporations, Neen is a natural fit for organizations looking for presenters that focus on productivity strategies, tools and resources. Neen also provides one-on-one consulting and mentoring to women on a variety of business issues and topics.

 

 

  1. Go for a run – or workout, whatever works for you. For me, it’s either a barre3 class at my local studio in Doylestown or putting on my shoes and going for a run. There is something about physical activity that helps get blood pumping and shifts my mindset.
  2. Make a to-do list – the simplicity of creating a braindump sometimes shocks me to make things happen. It allows me to focus my attention.
  3. Listen to podcasts – there are so many great podcasts, if I need health motivation I listen to On Air With Ella, if I need speech motivation I listen to Steal the Show.

 

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Liam Martin

 

Time Doctor

Liam Martin is co-founder and direct of marketing at Time Doctor, where they develop tools for team productivity concentrating on improving communication for remote teams. He has been a consultant for many online businesses concentrating on process design and scaling companies through outsourcing. In his spare time Liam likes to give talks on how to become a more productive student throughout universities in Canada and the U.S.

 

I’m generally really bad at productivity so I use technology and tricks to keep me motivated.

  1. Make Tea – I have a japanese tea set in my office, stop doing whatever distracting task I was doing and focus for 10 minutes on steeping tea. Pulls me completely out of non productive activities and resets me for the day.
  2. I turn on Time Doctor – Time Doctor automatically provides me popups when I get distracted with websites like facebook or twitter so I can get back to focused work. Having those popups there allows me to snap back into flow state focus.
  3. Put on my fake tattoo – I have a semi permanent tattoo that says ‘FOCUS’ and I usually put in on my left hand between my thumb and index finger, it again provides me with a quick snap back into flow.

 

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Kayla Matthews

 

Productivity Theory

Productivity Bytes

Kayla Matthews is a researcher, writer and blogger covering topics related to technology and productivity. She is the owner of ProductivityTheory.com and ProductivityBytes.com as well as a regular contributor to MakeUseOf, Inc. Innovate, The Huffington Post and The Daily Muse. In the past, her work has appeared on Inc., The Next Web, Lifehacker, Mashable and others.

 

When I’m feeling lazy, I get motivated by:

  1. Thinking about something productive or positive I’ve done recently. Sometimes it turns out that I just feel lazy because I haven’t acknowledged how motivated and productive I’ve been.
  2. Picking one major goal to accomplish in the next 24 hours. This keeps me from feeling overwhelmed by things I should do and gets me to focus on one task that will leave me feeling good about myself and my work.
  3. Enjoying that goal’s completion. Some people brush off the significance of completing a goal or move on to a new goal without taking time to really be proud of what they’ve accomplished. Even if your goal wasn’t earth-shattering, celebrating its completion establishes a cycle of positivity and good feelings toward being motivated and productive, which can keep you from making laziness a habit.

 

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Paul Minors

 

PaulMinors.com

Paul Minors is a productivity expert who teaches people how to manage their time, energy and attention through his writing at PaulMinors.com. When he’s not writing, he’s exercising, reading, or drinking coffee.

 

1. Schedule blocks of time on your calendar to do your work and stick to your plan. Honour these appointments like you would with a pre-arranged meeting or phone call?

2. Ask yourself WHY you’re doing the work. Getting back to the purpose of your work is a great way of remaindering yourself of what’s most important.

3. Start with one small step and focus on quick wins. Aim to make a small bit of progress and you’ll soon find your efforts start to snowball.

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Daniel Pink

 

DanPink.com

Daniel H. Pink is the author of five provocative books – including three long-running New York Times bestsellers,A Whole New MindDrive, and To Sell is Human. Dan’s books have been translated into 35 languages and have sold more than 2 million copies worldwide. He lives in Washington, DC, with his wife and their three children.

 

Spend a little less time thinking about how to do things and little more time thinking about why you’re doing those things in the first place.

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Zachary Sexton

 

ZacharySexton.com

Zachary Sexton earned a dual degree in Economics and Business Administration from the University of Wyoming. Since then, his career has lead to the US Senate, teaching in Denver Public Schools, writing, growing startups and small business consulting. Currently, nothing gives him more pleasure than showing business owners and individuals how to be more productive by using online and mobile tools to create their own digital organization systems.

 

1. Set a timer.

Feeling kinda lazy? 25 minutes. Feeling really lazy? 5 minutes. Feeling ultra, crazy lazy? 2 minutes. I recently invested in an Echo. Being able to ask Alexa to set the timer has made the timer technique even easier to deploy.

2. Change my energy level.

Laziness increases as energy decreases. So rather than trying to fight the laziness, I fight the low energy.

How?

With oxygen and water.

Why does this ALWAYS work?

Your body’s energy is produced by a organelles within your cells. These organelles are called mitochondria. After your body breaks your food down into sugar, the mitochondria uses that sugar to produce a substance called ATP. ATP is stored energy. A chemical reaction causes it to release negative electrons that power your body (Yeah. You run on electricity. Pretty neat, huh?). It does this through the Krebs cycle and the electronic transport chain. The two main ingredients for breaking down your food into sugar and the energy production cycle are O2 and H2O. If you increase your oxygen and hydration levels, you will have more energy. It’s biology. It’s chemistry. Google it. Better yet, test it.

When I’m feeling low energy and/or lazy I will drink a glass or two of water, do a breathing routine and give myself an exercise break to get my blood pumping.

I’ve also been known to ask Alexa to set a 20-minute timer for a power nap.

3. Remember my why.

I’m a questioner. If I don’t have a reason for doing something, I won’t do it. So if I’m putting off a task or project, I go back to why I decided it was important to do in the first place. Once I remember how taking action aligns with my long term goals, the motivation often comes back.

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Mark Shead

 

MarkShead.com

Productivity501

Mark Shead is the founder of Productivity 501. He has worked extensively as a coach with the U.S. Treasury and Federal Reserve Banks implementing Agile development and deployment practices. He specializes in helping teams build development/deployment pipelines in organizations with legacy change management policies and turning six-month deployments cycles into something measured in hours.

 

1. First I see if I can just not do whatever it is that is causing me to feel lazy. Often we find ourselves committed to doing things that don’t really matter. That lazy feeling may be your subconscious saying, “Why are you doing this? It isn’t important.” Maybe you can’t just skip the task, but knowing that you are working on something that is actually valuable is a good step toward not procrastination.

2. Second I see if I can delegate the task. Just because something must be done, doesn’t mean I’m the one that needs to do it. I use a service called Red Butler that makes it easy to delegate administrative type tasks. They have helped me with everything from categorizing expenses to waiting on hold on the phone to calling my son’s soccer team to remind them of the upcoming game.

3. Finally, if I can’t skip or delegate a task, I try to make it into something I don’t mind doing. For example, you can’t delegate exercise to someone else, and it is important enough you shouldn’t skip it. By putting a treadmill in front of our TV instead of a couch, it is easier to be motivated to exercise.

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Michael Sliwinski

 

Sliwinski.com

Michael Sliwinski is a productivity guy. He’s the founder of Nozbe, a project management and collaboration platform (web-based with native apps for the Mac, Windows, Android, iPad and the iPhone), the editor of the Productive! Magazine and best-selling co-author of the #iPadOnly book.

 

The first tip would be to start small. Often, when I have a lot on my plate, I start with the easiest task on my agenda. This gets me ready for my busy day. The second tip is the Pomodoro technique where you divide your day into 30 minute intervals. This basically means you put a timer for 25 minutes and start doing only one task and have a 5 minute break afterwards. This time pressure and single focus helps get back on track and get into the productivity rhythm. And lastly, I would suggest decluttering your workplace. You’d be surprised how much more productive you are when you’re working at a tidy desk!

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Nick Snapp

 

Make It Snappy Show

Nick Snapp is the owner of Inspire Me Solutions, where he consults and coaches with overwhelmed entrepreneurs to remove bottlenecks, save time and increase profitability using his analytical engineering roots. He is obsessed about helping entrepreneurs uncover their “game-changer,” the one activity that will deliver the greatest return on invested time both at work and at home. He is best known as the atypical-engineer host of The Make it Snappy Productivity Show podcast, and all things “snappy,” for that matter.

 

 

  1. Find a good accountability partner who will hold your feet to the fire and commit to exactly when, you’ll have whatever you’re feeling lazy about complete.
  2. Publicly announce by when you’ll complete whatever it is you’re trying to get done and feel lazy about over social media
  3. Drop it and take a power nap for 25-mins

 

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Maura Thomas

 

Regain Your Time

Maura Thomas is an award-winning international speaker and trainer on individual and corporate productivity and attention management for clients including VMWare, Old Navy, and AIG. She is a TEDx Speaker, founder of RegainYourTime.com, author of two books, and she appears weekly in business media outlets such as Fast Company, Inc., and is a regular contributor to the Harvard Business Review.

 

 

  1. Be specific when adding items to your task list. If it sounds like a daunting task that will take a long time, you’re much more likely to skip over it, especially when you’re feeling lazy. For example, “write book” is a task that will hang out on my list forever and I will actively avoid it. Even getting more specific to “write chapter one” still sounds hard. It was only when I identified the specific action, and put that on my list, did I get more motivated to tackle it. In my case, I started with “Identify 3 main objectives of chapter 1.”
  2. Use a timer. I can do anything for a few minutes, and giving myself permission to stop when the timer goes off makes it easier to get started. Usually, I don’t stop, because the timer allows me to get on a roll. But even if I do stop, a few minutes doing that thing is better than no minutes doing that thing. This even works for behaviors I want to change. For example, I hate to exercise, but I started by setting a timer for 1 minute, and telling myself I’d just do sit ups or push ups or plank until the timer goes off. After a week of 1 minute of exercise, I bumped it up to two minutes (and two exercises). I’m currently doing Tony Horton’s 22-minute Hard Core, so I can attest that this strategy really works!
  3. Keep all of your tasks in one place. It’s hard to get started (and easy to procrastinate) when you have some things you need to do in your email, some things in your head, some things on sticky notes, and some things in the notebook you take to meetings. You have to keep all of your actions (tasks) together, otherwise it’s like trying to do a puzzle with the pieces scattered all over the house!

 

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Laura Vanderkam

 

LauraVanderkam.com

Laura Vanderkam is the author of I Know How She Does It,168 Hours, and What the Most Successful People Do Before Breakfast-a paperback compilation of the bestselling ebook series, all from Portfolio/Penguin. Please visit www.lauravanderkam.com.

 

Here are a few things I try:

— go for a run. Sometimes I just need a change of scenery, and some time to process my thoughts.

— reward myself. I can read something fun or get a snack when I’ve done whatever I’m supposed to be doing.

— let it go. Probably, I’ll live to fight another day. Most things can wait.

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Social Media & SEO

Harsh Agrawal

 

ShoutMeLoud

Harsh Agrawal is an award-winning professional blogger and the founder ShoutMeLoud and Shout University. ShoutMeLoud is one of the most popular international resources on blogging, SEO and internet marketing. When he’s not blogging, Harsh is probably traveling or trying a new kind of adventure sport.

 

 

I read actionable content. Stuff that provokes action or is a case study. Usually, I have found this one trick works best for me.

I start with doing lazy work. Stuff like which require less mental engagement & more action. One important thing to keep in mind is use Pomodoro technique along with this. As you don’t want to end up doing the same work for endless hours.

I Disconnect completely from the internet. Just a Pen, Paper & me. This is when new ideas start popping in. Every month, I have at least one such day when I’m not connected to the internet. This also helps in lower down overall fatigue/burnout.

 

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Mike Allton

 

The Social Media Hat

Mike Allton is a leading Blogging and Social Media Consultant. Mike has developed a reputation for being an excellent teacher and particularly enjoys showing businesses how Content Marketing, the combination of blog content, social media and SEO, can lead to increased website traffic, generation of more leads, and conversion of more sales. Allton is paticularly active on Google+ where he’s known for his mad blogging skills and impressive HootSuite expertise.

 

 

Interestingly, I would seldom say that I feel ‘lazy’ – just sometimes not motivated or directed on what to work on next. To me, lazy means that I just don’t want to do anything, and that’s almost never the case. Instead, it’s a matter of getting excited about working on something or at least deciding what needs to be worked on next and doing it.

Which means my first tip is to always have a To Do list. Perhaps multiple lists. I have a To Do list for my blog ( www.thesocialmediahat.com) for long-term development, as well as one for my primary responsibility, SiteSell (www.sitesell.com). And of course a personal To Do list. That way, whether it’s during the day, evening or weekend, if I’m not sure what I should or could be working on next, I can glance at that list.

My blog content has a kind of To Do list as well – it’s my Evernote notebook that contains all of my blog post ideas and drafts.

Having all of these lists is great for seeing what you can work on next. But having them in front of you also works to my second tip: if there’s no clear priority, work on the task that gets you excited.

Certainly, if something needs to get done today, you need to work on that task. But if you’re a bit more open, then you should skim through your tasks or blog post ideas and allow the most interesting or exciting one to bubble up.

I mentioned my Evernote notebook – this is how I’m able to be so prolific with my blog writing. Instead of sitting down to a blank page, I can skim through all my previous ideas and settle on the one that gets me excited.

Finally, if all else fails, give in! (A little bit.) Allow yourself to take a break now and then. Go for a walk, watch a funny TV show, or read a good book. Allow your tortoise brain as John Cleese calls it to free roam and be creative for a bit. Then get back to work refreshed and re-energized.

 

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David Amerland

 

DavidAmerland.com

David Amerland is an author, speaker and analyst who spends more time than might be considered healthy looking at different device screens and analysing patterns, trends and the impact of current technological developments on our working lives and lifestyles. In addition to the books he writes, he also advises a handful of companies globally, and is a frequent contributor to Forbes, journalism.co.uk, Imassera and Social Media Today.

 

Laziness is not so much a desire to not do any work as a suddenly felt loss of direction in the work that is being done that expresses itself as a lack of motivation to do it. I have developed three neat ‘tricks’ to make sure I never experience that kind of feeling:

1. Make it about who you are rather than what you do. Your work should be part of your identity instead of some chore that has to be done. Just as you (hopefully) don’t get out of bed in the morning wondering who you are that day, so you shouldn’t start a working day wondering what you have to do and how to do it.

2. Add value instead of noise. We are at our best and most alive when we feel we are helping others. Understand how your work fits in with that, where its ultimate value lies, what it helps others to do and how others depend on it. Then working is a service you provide to many other people. Your responsibility to their need always trumps fatigue, distractions and the desire to play hooky.

3. Make it fun. Nothing kills the desire to work faster than a sense of it being “just another day on a treadmill”. Think about what you do. Discover fresh insights even in the more mundane tasks. Work is an expression of our desire to create and our will to survive. If we look long enough and deep enough we discover connective threads within patterns of activity that tie us all the way back to that small ad-hoc group of hunters squatting around a camp fire discussing how to take a Woolly Mammoth down. make each day you work, your own.

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Jeff Bullas

 

JeffBullas.com

Jeff Bullas is an entrepreneur, blogger, author, marketer and speaker. He works with personal brands and business to optimize their online personal and company brands with emerging technologies, content, social media technologies and digital marketing.

 

When I feel lazy and need to ramp up the motivation I find these activation hacks can work well.

1) Read an inspiring book

2) Leap onto my bike and get the blood, legs and endorphins pumping

3) Strap myself into my chair and just start

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Matthew Capala

 

Alphametic

Matthew Capala is an international SEO and content marketing strategist, speaker, author, and entrepreneur. As the Founder and Managing Director at Alphametic, a data-first SEO and content marketing agency, Matthew helps businesses increase their online visibility through data-driven solutions that yield higher ROI. Matthew runs Search Decoder, a popular SEO blog for entrepreneurs, and has appeared speaking on main stages at some of the largest conferences in the world. He is the author of bestselling “SEO Like I’m 5” and writes on The Next Web, Entrepreneur and Social Media Today.

 

First, I just take a break if I’m feeling lazy about my work. There is no point in trying to focus on work if your mind is not there – it will be low quality and low productivity work. It’s better to restart and get into the “flow” – a creative and productive state of mind. If I work from home, I take a stroll on the beach or jump into the pool or take a bike out. I’m fortunate to live by the ocean, but you can just take your dog for the walk, clean your room, or walk outside to get your favorite latte. The idea is to reset your brain from work.

If I still feel like I cannot deliver my best work after taking the break, I change the environment. If I worked from home, I’d go to a coffee shop or office. Or the other way around. Lastly, I recommend finding an accountability partner who works with you on your goal attainment and motivation. It could be your sister or bother or a professional coach. Your goal is to be accountable to someone.

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Jim Dougherty

 

leaderswest

Jim Dougherty writes content on Leaders West. He writes about how smaller businesses can leverage social media to their advantage (and some other stuff).

 

Thanks for the reminder. I recently read Rachel Jonat’s book, Do Less: A Minimalist Guide to a Simplified, Organized, and Happy Life, and one of the key takeaways for me is that we have the capacity to do three things well. After reading that, I chose my three priorities and it motivates me to complete tasks that fall within my three chosen priorities. http://www.theminimalistmom.com/book/

I also started keeping a Bullet Journal a couple of months ago, and the daily reminder of things that I need to do helps to motivate me to finish them. http://bulletjournal.com/

I also follow David Allen’s GTD rule that if you can accomplish something in two minutes you should do it immediately. Sometimes this helps me to accomplish minutia that I otherwise would feel too lazy to do. http://gettingthingsdone.com/

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Scott Eddy

 

Mr. Scott Eddy

Scott Eddy has gone from being a stockbroker to a social media influencer for the travel industry. Originally from Miami, he lived in Bangkok for 10 years, Spain for 4 years, London for 1 year, Philippines for 1 year and Portugal for 6 months. He is the Global Brand Ambassador for Zipkick, a travel personalization company that’s set to revolutionize the industry.

 

Whatever is on my to-do list, I try to dive in as soon as I wake up, don’t let procrastination show its ugly face.

I constantly watch people that are better than me in my industry, my competitive nature takes over, and puts my day into overdrive!

As well as a to-do list, I also keep monthly goal list, I look at it daily, and it keeps me on my toes.

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Ashley Faulkes

 

Mad Lemmings

Ashley is an SEO and WordPress specialist and founder of Mad Lemmings. He loves helping clients get found (and ranked higher) on Google. When he is not chained to his computer, you will find him in the Swiss Alps yodeling or making Swiss chocolate disappear.

 

When my motivation is low, I only have to think back to the life I had before I started Mad Lemmings and helping people with SEO.

I used to work for thankless large corporations, doing work that no one really cared about. Now I get to work with motivated people and businesses, achieving results that matter.

It’s a simple form of motivation really!

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Luke Guy

 

LukeGuy.com

Luke Guy is a blogger, marketer, and strategist. He looks forward to helping you grow your business. He has been featured on many marketing blogs and has gained national attention. Luke studies SEO, website conversion, email marketing, and product launches.

 

The 3 things that motivate me are easy to name. The number one thing that motivates me is my end goal. That goal is to build a group who loves me and needs me.

To build a tribe is hard work, but my dream of that tribe motivates me through the vallies. So having a goal within itself motivates me to keep going.

So my dream of that motivates me. When I’m wondering why I’m working, I remind myself of my future tribe.

The 2nd thing that motivates me is music. When I need energy to write an amazing blog post, I turn on sound tracks from my favorite composers. These songs are orchestrated with no words. That way I can feel energized without being distracted by the words. It really helps.

The 3rd thing that motivates me is depression. That made sound a little weird, but it’s true. There’s a part of me that can get depressed if I don’t keep moving. When I quit building or working towards my goal, I get depressed. So when I began to feel that, I realized it’s time to get up and get back to work. These 3 things is a weird combo but they are my top three that motivates through it all in the business world.

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Andréa Jones

 

OnlineDrea.com

Andréa Jones is a Social Media Manager, Blogger & Community Builder who creates engaging and beautiful content for your fans while you run your business. She teams up with overwhelmed creative entrepreneurs to develop and implement social media and content marketing strategies in order to free up their time for building their businesses.

 

What a great question! Finding motivation as a solopreneur is one of the hardest aspects of the job, in my opinion. First, I remind myself why I chose this path of working for myself and being my own boss. Next, I make a list. Seriously, “to do” lists and putting tasks in my calendar are the things that keep me sane. Lastly, one of my favorite ways to find motivation when I’m feeling lazy is starting with something I love. As long as I do something that I love once a day, the rest is easy.

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Brent Jones

 

BrentJonesOnline.com

Brent Jones specializes in social media solutions for startups, solo entrepreneurs, professionals, and local brick-and-mortar businesses. He also writes a popular blog providing advice on how to achieve the freedom, flexibility and financial independence offered by a career in freelancing.

 

First, I have to say, I seldom feel lazy. I don’t sit still very well. If anything, I could probably benefit from a few tips on how to relax a little. But in those rare moments when I do feel lazy, I do the following:

 

  • I use that idle time as an excuse to dream about the future… this usually excites me and gives me a reason to spring back into action.
  • I take a moment to be silently grateful for the many good things in my life. Gratitude tends to be very energizing.
  • And lastly, I’ll go for a long bike ride. Cycling helps me clear my head and focus on the important things in life…

 

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Christian Karasiewicz

 

Social Chefs

Christian Karasiewicz is a consultant and public speaker on social media, Internet Marketing and technology. He enjoys helping individuals and business owners develop, create, and put into action, a successful marketing campaign. With over ten years of experience across social media, e-commerce, Internet Marketing, personal branding, affiliate marketing and related technologies, Christian Karasiewicz strives to create meaningful social media campaigns that help businesses connect and engage with their customers and to keep coming back.

 

As an entrepreneur, you’re always on-the-go.

When I find I need extra motivation here are three things I do.

1. Start

If I’m having a hard time getting going, the best thing to do is just start on the work. After about five minutes, you forget about why you were procrastinating and that should be enough motivation to keep you going until the project is complete.

2. Delayed gratification

Another thing I like to do if I need extra motivation is to reward myself. I don’t get the reward until the work is done. By delaying gratification, this can give you that much needed push to power through when you don’t feel like it.

3. Remember your “why”

In order to keep yourself motivated, revisit your “why.” This can help you regain your focus and encourage you to keep going – even if it’s just a few steps at a time.

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Kevan Lee

 

Buffer

Kevan Lee is the director of marketing at Buffer, the social media publishing tool for brands, agencies, and marketers. He shares his best, actionable advice on content marketing, his favorite writing tips, and his top time-saving tools on his personal website KevanLee.com. He works to help others get more results from their online writing.

 

1. Time blocking. I’ll split my day into chunks and press to finish projects before a time block ends.

2. New tab browser extensions. Motivation is great, and Color Tab, too. Basically anything that keeps me away from getting distracted with a new tab.

3. Lean into the laziness. Give myself 5 guilt-free minutes of laziness then get back to work. 

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Dan R. Morris

 

Blogging Concentrated

Dan R. Morris is an expert in the digital media industry. He actively studies the trends, advances and everything new in tech, social media and content marketing. He delivers that information weekly through his Amplify Podcast, recently ranked the 27th best podcast out there. Through live events, consulting, a forum and a membership platform, he helps bloggers and businesses understand the science of online success.

 

Motivating Tips:

The obstacles put in your way, the speed bumps, they aren’t there for you. They are there for the people who don’t want it as badly as you do. Every hurdle you overcome puts another step between you and your competition.

Don’t follow the path of least resistance. Doing the things you know and understand means you aren’t doing the things that will help you grow and expand. You are not required to know how to do everything. You are required to make sure everything that needs to happen, does.

Know your numbers. Dollar per visitor, revenue per week, revenue per traffic source . . . revenue per ad space . . . know them backwards and forwards. You can’t get stuck if you are always working on a measurable goal.

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Ted Rubin

 

TedRubin.com

Ted Rubin is a leading Social Marketing Strategist, Brand Evangelist, CMO and Keynote Speaker. His book Return on Relationship was released in 2013. He has a deep online background beginning in 1997 working with Seth Godin at Yoyodyne, which was acquired in 1998 by Yahoo! He is known in the social media world for his enthusiastic, energetic & undeniably personal connection to people.

 

First and foremost I’ve always known that for me it’s not so much about being lazy, because I am just not. When my motivation ebbs and I “get” lazy, it is most often because I am depressed, not focused, or simply have not set enough goals for myself.

1 – So when depressed I do my best to live by a Joan Baez quote… “Action is the anecdote to despair,” and it gets me moving.

2 – When I lose focus I think about something I often tell others… “it’s all about Attitude, Perspective… Mindset.” This tends to get me to re-focus.

3 – And finally when I find myself not getting enough done… I set short-term goals to help motivate me to take action toward accomplishments. I know myself well and and I am an achiever, and I hate missing goals or letting people down, so I get more micro about it to get me moving daily.

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Ron Sela

 

RonSela.com

Ron Sela is a Profit-Driven Marketer who was recently named one of Top 100 Influencers in Social Media Marketing by Onalytica. His unique talent lies in helping businesses increase their bottom-line by creating innovative digital marketing experiences.

 

I believe motivation is contagious, being around someone who you idolize or who sets an example of success with your goal is one of the best ways to emulate that same motivational push that they have used. The best part about this tip is that with technology and social media, you don’t even have to know the people you admire personally, you can soak up their success from researching them, watching videos and reading their books.

Affirmations are one of the simplest, most personalized and beneficial tips to stay motivated when feeling lazy. Throughout history, some of the most successful people have said they carried around a notecard with their personal affirmation handwritten on it and repeated it to themselves, with emotion, as many times a day as possible.

Commit to a set of subtle, easily achievable, daily goals in the direction of your major aim. Anyone who has ever achieved any huge goal in life has done so only by first completing many consecutive small targets. Make sure these daily goals are non-negotiable and that you reach them no matter what. Small daily goals keep you from veering too far off the path; they conjure up an emotion of achievement, and in turn, they help fuel you to go a bit further until you’re out of that slump.

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Brooke Sellas

 

B Squared Media

Brooke B. Sellas is the Founder & Chief Digital Strategist at B Squared Media. She is an entrepreneur, a wife, a really cool older sister to two absolutely amazing women, and an advocate for curing cystic fibrosis. She is an adjunct lecturer in the spring, teaching classes on consumer behavior at CUNY Baruch in New York City.

 

1. Break things down into manageable chunks. When you have 50 tasks to complete in one day, it can feel overwhelming. I like to work in blocks, so I may dedicate the morning hours to mundane tasks (I’m SO not a morning person) and keep creative tasks for lunchtime when I’m peppier. Or, just change your mindset. Instead of focusing on having 50 tasks to complete, make it into a challenge and tell yourself you have around 6 tasks to complete each hour.

2. Tackle the hardest tasks first. You procrastinate for a reason! That’s why at the end of the day you’ll often find the “big, ugly” tasks sitting there waiting for you. I often challenge myself to deal with these items first, that way by the end of the day I’m doing fun stuff. Or better, if fires pop up later on, I’ve already dealt with the most pressing items on my list.

3. Put the perfectionist in a corner. Admittedly, I’m a perfectionist. Which means even if it’s “quitting time” and I still have 10 of those 50 tasks left, I’ll stick to it until it’s done. I’ve come to realize that doing this hurts more than it helps — especially when it’s an internal task and not something that’s a deliverable. Some things can AND SHOULD wait. If I’m staying true to #2, the deliverables have all been taken care of and the little items can wait until tomorrow … or maybe even the day after! 

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Dennis Seymour

 

DenSeymour.com

Dennis Seymour currently runs SeriousMD and LeapFroggr, a digital marketing and SEO company, based in the Philippines. Over the years, he and his team have worked with hundreds of companies, all around the world.

 

Each person is unique so here’s what I do to combat it:

1. I make sure I plan out my days at the start of the day. I need to see what I need to accomplish so I minimize the feeling of laziness.

2. If I feel lazy in the middle of the day, I’m just sleepy or tired so I take a nap! It’s not rocket science. Once you wake up, you’ll feel better and be more productive rather than sucking it up and “trying” to work.

3. I have a picture of my family in all my workspaces. Think about why you are doing it and just push through. Often times, when you feel lazy, it’s just procrastinating because something is tedious to do and not challenging. Just think of who or why you are doing this and power through.

It’s OK to feel lazy because it’s normal. That’s important to understand as entrepreneurs often “hate” on themselves if they feel this. Understanding how you “work” is vital to getting over this hump. Each of us react to things differently so test different things.

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Tim Soulo

 

Ahrefs

Tim Soulo is the guy responsible for marketing and product development at Ahrefs. But most importantly he’s the chief evangelist of the company. He also runs a small cozy personal blog called BloggerJet.

 

Every person is different, so what works for me might not work for you. But hopefully my “motivation hacks” will help you discover your own ones:

1. I love reading/watching stories of successful people. This inspires me to stop procrastinating and tick yet another item in my todo list. If I achieve at least 1/10 of their success in my lifetime – I will feel accomplished and proud of myself.

2. I have a special folder on my drive where I save images of things I want to get and places I want to visit with my family. Most of these things/trips are pretty expensive, so reviewing that folder for 10-15 minutes motivates me enough to work all day long. A day of hard work brings me closer to all these things on my list.

3. I have a few great friends who belong to this rare group of people called “overachievers”. It’s always great to chat with them once in a while and learn about their recent successes. I’m very competitive in nature, so when these guys make me feel small – I work twice as hard to keep up with them.

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Owen Video

 

Owen Video

Owen Video is a Video Marketing Consultant specializing in Small Business Growth. He has a YouTube channel with over 100,000 views and recently defeated cancer while doubling his business. With over 1,000 web videos produced for clients and hundred of thousands in revenue from video marketing campaigns, Owen is uniquely qualified to show small business owners and entrepreneurs the pathway for making money with online video.

 

#1 – Remember that you are in control of your emotions. Often times we reinforce negative self-talk like “I’m tired. I’m stressed. I can’t handle this.” Those negative thoughts repeated actually encourage your mood. Reverse negative self talk.

#2- Review your wins. Laziness often comes from complacency when you feel like you can afford to rest. Review your wins from the week – every sale, lead, good call, good design… whatever. Remind yourself of your awesomeness and you might find that motivation.

#3 – Move. Motion creates emotion. There’s not many lazy people taking a jog or doing jumping jacks. Get off the couch. Shake out your arms and legs. Move around the house to get your positive energy going.

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James Wedmore

 

JamesWedmore.com

James Wedmore has a simple mission: show business owners how to create and execute effective video marketing campaigns without spending a lot of time or money. After several successful ventures, including an Online Bartending School, James founded Video Traffic Academy: an online YouTube Marketing Training Program that has enrolled over 10,000 small business owners and entrepreneurs all over the country. He has been featured on numerous sites such as Entrepreneur.com, Rise to the Top, Mixergy and many more.

 

When I feel lazy and unmotivated, I STOP all work and I play. Surfing, binge-watching Netflix, going for a walk, or playing a video game. I do not try to force motivation. Just like you can’t force a pregnancy or a flower blooming. Get in the flow of the natural rhythm of creation and things come to you with ease. So my advice: Choose laziness and embrace it. You probably needed a good rest anyway. And remember, there’s always tomorrow.

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Writing

Jaime Buckley

 

Wanted Hero

Jaime Buckley is an author, illustrator, and father of 12. He is the creator of the popular Chronicles of a Hero book series and produces custom artwork for hundreds of bloggers and Indie Authors through JaimeBuckley.com and on Fiverr as a ‘Top Rated Seller’.

 

What 3 tips for motivation do you use when you feel lazy?

I think this is actually a funny question.

Not ‘ha, ha,’ funny, but more of a skewed, off-kilter, ‘you may be considered a major butt-head if you don’t give the right answer,’ kind of funny.

First of all, it’s rare I feel lazy.

Sooooo, ‘lazy concerning what?’

Since I’m more than a hundred pounds overweight, I’m sure as hell not going down the health or exercise path–you can take that at your own peril and leave me alone.

(…leave the cheesecake on your way out.)

Since I have 12 children and consider myself to be a “successful” parent who strives to live by principle and not personalities, this question doesn’t apply to parenting.

Those who doubt me, just meet my kids.

So I’m going to take a stab at work. I’m obsessive about my labors and yes, I’ve had occasions where I wondered if I was lazy.

TIP #1: Do An Internal Check

  • I have to ask myself WHY I feel like I’m being lazy?
  • Is there work I’m avoiding?
  • Do I have a deadline coming up?
  • What kind of hours have I put into my current project?
  • Have I allowed myself to be distracted?
  • Am I bored?
  • Is there something else I’d rather be doing?
  • Regardless of the current circumstances, have I done all I can to take the project forward to completion?

These questions are geared to discern the truth of my mood.

If I can look at my work honestly and see that I have put forth my all, there might be a chance that this isn’t laziness, but the effects of burnout.

Burnout is a danger in my world, where creativity is what puts food on the table and molds a future I can look forward to.

If I’m on the verge of burnout, it’s a sign I need to recuperate. As hard as it might be, I then have to force myself to shut down and walk away from work, regardless of the project.

It’s time for family, rest, maybe some fun and laughter.

If I AM being lazy, however, and avoiding work for whatever reason, I move onto the next tip.

TIP #2: Review Paths To Long-Term Goals

I’m a goal-driven person. If I’m feeling lazy, it’s usually because I’ve lost sight to what’s important.

Those without vision, perish.

We can often lose momentum towards our goals when we go for long periods of time without a “win” along the way. A mental and emotional reward, that reminds us why we focus, labor and sacrifice to get what we want (or where we want to be). Very few people can go on indefinitely without needing to experience some form of success or reward along the way.

I like to make sure my long-term goals are broken down into achievable steps.

This isn’t just so they can be accomplished, but so they become bold markers of progress towards an ultimate success.

Then, if I’m feeling lazy, I can map out certain efforts to get me that much closer to bigger goals.

TIP #3: Small Effort Create BIG Results

The last thing I do is to remind myself that even though I may feel in a slump or maybe I just don’t want to go to work that day…a small efforts, when they’re the RIGHT efforts, can make HUGE changes in our lives.

I just picked up an excellent new book by author Michael Alden called, ‘5% MORE: Making Small Changes To Achieve Extraordinary Results’. This book confirmed what I’ve believed all along and points out that the secret to just about anything you want in life isn’t somewhere ‘out there’, but inside you, right now.

When you’re feeling lazy, it’s important to make those consistent efforts, even if they’re small…and beCAUSE you’re feeling lazy, the thought of making a small effort is doable. You’re more likely to make the effort.

Those small efforts will add up over time, form new habits of success and will, I believe, virtually eliminate any tendency for being (or even feeling) lazy.

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Elna Cain

 

Innovative Ink

Elna Cain is a freelance writer for hire. Her writing has been used as a lead generation tool for small businesses and entrepreneurs. She has expert knowledge in digital marketing, branding, email marketing, content marketing, and blogging. When she’s not crafting compelling copy, she’s running around chasing her twin toddlers…with her coffee in one hand.

 

Three things that help me stay motivated to work are deadlines, outlines and batching.

I need external pressure for a lot of things and one of them is my client projects. I have a lot of clients that have a flexible deadline and while that’s fantastic, for me, it can lead into being lazy or just waiting until the last minute. So, I usually end up setting a personal deadline thats days in advance and that helps me get my work done.

Another thing that helps me are outlines. I make sure to outline every project I have for my clients. If I fail to write an outline, the work just won’t get done. Most of my day is being a mom to my twins so when I get the time to sit down for uninterrupted time, an outline speeds up my process and gets me focussed right away.

Finally, batching work always helps me keep the motivation up. Instead of multi-tasking or working on several things at once, I try to group similar tasks together. I might do all my email in the morning, all my images before lunch and all my writing work after supper. I’m much more efficient this way.

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Jeff Goins

 

Goins, Writer

Jeff Goins is the author of four books including the national best seller, The Art of Work. He shares his reflections on writing and life on his popular blog Goins, Writer.

 

I work with my laziness. I don’t try to overcome it. I anticipate it, work around it. Laziness happens. It’s part of life. Plan for it so that when you feel demotivated, you still have time to get your work done.

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Ann Hermes

 

Lifehack.org

Ann Hermes is a Freelance Creative Writer, Copy-editor, Translator and Graphic Designer based in Indonesia. She is on the editorial team at Lifehack.org.

 

When I feel lazy, I will be lazy for a while and tend to procrastinate my to-do-list. I think being lazy is OK as long as we know the limit. I always make sure to set the deadline or make goals/targets because I think our to-do-list (by this I mean important things we must finish due to our responsibility) should be finished in the end. So when I feel lazy, I’ll just be lazy; doing all the things I want to do that make me happy while gathering my motivation again.

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Mary Jaksch

 

Write to Done

A-List Blogging

Goodlife Zen

Mary Jaksch is best known for her exceptional training for writers at WritetoDone.com. Grab a copy of her free reportHow to Create an Irresistible Lead Magnet in Less Than 5 Hours. In her “spare” time, Mary’s also the brains behind AlistBlogging.net. and GoodlifeZEN.com, a Zen Master, a mother, and a 5th Degree Black Belt. Join her FREE online training, 5 Powerful Online Writing Strategies.

 

As everyone knows, it’s particularly difficult to rustle up motivation when you feel tired, overwhelmed, or stressed. These are the times when doing something extra beside your everyday tasks, like going for a run, helping others, being creative, or cranking out some more content can feel like it’s just too much.

The key to feeling motivated at such times is to change your mindset. Because, if you feel like grumbling and think you deserve a rest instead of taking up a challenging activity, it will be difficult for you to take action.

What works for me is a two-part strategy. Part #1 is to notice the voices in my head and to end each negative thought with, “…but it’s a privilege!” This puts me into a positive frame of mind. Part #2 is to immediately take a small step toward the action I’m resisting. For example, I might put on running clothes or go to my desk and open my writing software. With this two-part strategy, I can combat flagging motivation, lift my spirits, and take action.

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Mark Lawrence

 

MarkLawrence.buzz

Mark Lawrence is the accomplished author of The Broken Empire and Red Queen’s War book series. In addition to his writing, he works as a research scientist focused on various rather intractable problems in the field of artificial intelligence. He has held secret level clearance with both US and UK governments. At one point he was qualified to say ‘this isn’t rocket science … oh wait, it actually is’.

 

I’m lucky enough to do something I love, but when I feel lazy I just slack off. Knowing I don’t *have* to work somehow makes working easier.

I would have to go back to university exams to remember a time I had to force myself to work. Then I would i) promise myself rewards ii) remind myself what I was suffering for iii) imagine how it would feel to do poorly just because I hadn’t tried.

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Kevan Lee

 

Buffer

Kevan Lee is the director of marketing at Buffer, the social media publishing tool for brands, agencies, and marketers. He shares his best, actionable advice on content marketing, his favorite writing tips, and his top time-saving tools on his personal website KevanLee.com. He works to help others get more results from their online writing.

 

1. Time blocking. I’ll split my day into chunks and press to finish projects before a time block ends.

2. New tab browser extensions. Motivation is great, and Color Tab, too. Basically anything that keeps me away from getting distracted with a new tab.

3. Lean into the laziness. Give myself 5 guilt-free minutes of laziness then get back to work. 

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Pooja Lohana

 

Damn Fine Writing

Pooja Lohana is a freelancer who writes books, edits copy and writes stuff for businesses like yours. You can find (and hire!) her atDamn Fine Writing. Pooja is also the creator of the Well-Paid Writer’s Club, a free course to help others break into the freelance writing market.

 

1. Feeling lazy is all about the mindset you’re in. I’ve found that lack of motivation can easily be tackled by changing your physiology. In other words, you move, do something different, shake up your “status quo” and now your body is too busy to deal with “laziness”.

2. Your physiology creates psychology (motion creates emotion), you’re then, essentially affecting your mind to function in alignment with your new physiology.

3. Another neat tip is to go back to your reference points. A reference point is a small win, a benchmark you hit, a milestone you achieved in your work (or in your health, lifestyle, relationships etc). A reference point is in your past, something you’ve already done. It gives you an assurance that you can do this, too. The more # of reference points you build, the better.

I’ll give a personal example. I’m a writer and marketer by profession. It takes mojo + creativity to ideate, implement, test and measure new ideas for my clients. When I’m on a strict deadline, it can sometimes feel like I have exhausted all ideas (clearly, not true). I move in a different direction (as opposed to sitting at my desk waiting for the ideas to strike). I take a quick walk to the kitchen to make myself a cup of tea, or even walk down to the local cafe. Creating a simple change in your environment like this can work wonders, but of course, you don’t want to approach it from “I give up, time to slack” mindset  Quite the opposite!

My reference points are usually in the form of “Folder of Awesome”. It has all my past wins, client testimonials, accolades, thank yous, and success stories that my clients have shared with me. I save it all and I make it a point to revisit it, reflecting on what worked, what didn’t and how I can do even better.  I still have “aha” moments when I do this exercise. It’s that powerful. It anchors you back to your mojo.

Doing the above exercises breaks my current lazy state and I’m soon in a new state that’s more conducive to getting things done. The definition of insanity is to keep doing the same thing and expecting a different result. The next time you feel lazy, do something else, different from what you’re doing. Break your “strategy” of how you “do” lazy. And see how you go.

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Glen Long

 

Smart Blogger

Glen Long is the Managing Editor of Smart Blogger (a.k.a. chief content monkey). When he’s not creating or editing content for the blog or an upcoming course, he’s probably reading or watching Nordic Noir.

 

 

  • Do something requiring little effort (thus indulging your lazy feelings) but is also likely to boost your energy levels. For example: listen to some upbeat music, watch an inspiring TED talk, or read a chapter from a motivational book.
  • Create mini-rewards for task completion that will appeal to your lazy side. For example, you could tell yourself: “Once I’ve completed this blog post, I’ll reward myself with 20 minutes on the couch in front of my favorite Netflix series.”
  • Imagine yourself reaching the end of the day having achieved little of value due to your lazy mood. Mentally amplify any feelings of disappointment and frustration and use them to spur yourself into action.

 

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Sylviane Nuccio

 

Generate More Money

Sylviane Nuccio is a life coach and copywriter. As a life coach, she transforms people’s lives with painful emotions that led them to negative experiences which keep them from fulfilling their potentials and dreams. As a Copywriter she improves her clients experience to attract more clients through their blog content and online articles.

 

1) Knowing my goal – my WHY. Ultimately, my life’s propose. This is a great motivator for anyone who wants to keep going and accomplish their daily goals.

2) Taking one task at the time, trying to concentrate on that one task ONLY. When you’re driving your car at night your headlights allow you to see only a few yards ahead of you, yet this is enough to go from point A to point B. It’s the same thing with the daily tasks you have to accomplish to grow your business, your project, your life. Take one step at the time, and don’t stress out about tomorrow.

3) Meditate. Meditation is an excellent exercise that I use on a daily basis to tease my motivation. Meditation affects your subconscious – this part of you where all motivation and lack thereof comes from. So shaping your subconscious mind to be motivated (with specific meditation exercises) will bring about amazing results.

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Samar Owais

 

SamarOwais.com

Samar Owais is a freelance writer who helps small companies spread the word about their business through blogging. Aside from blogging for her clients, she also create content plans, acts as their blog’s editor, and even helps create style guides for their blogs.

 

As a mother of two, I don’t have the luxury of laziness. If I’m lazy, the kids get fed cereal for lunch, the laundry piles up, and my work becomes a distant memory. As a result, I operate on a very tight schedule. Kids and family time doesn’t encroach on work time and vice versa.

But if I’m not careful, work-time becomes a time I can (finally) relax. It isn’t unusual for me to decide to browse through Pinterest – just until I finish my tea. Before I know it, an hour has passed, my tea is long gone, and I’ve somehow scrolled through scores of pictures of Benedict Cumberbatch.

Here’s how I combat my work procrastination and absent-mindedness:

1. Set a 20-minute timer. Once I’m at my desk, I need some time to unwind. Otherwise, the general craziness that’s part and parcel of life with two kids weighs on my mind and messes with my writing flow. In those 20 minutes, I sip my tea, scroll through Pinterest, talk to my sister, watch a Youtube video – basically do whatever I feel like. Once the timer ends, I close everything down and pull up my to-do list and start working.

2. Not checking email until I have crossed 3 small items or 1 big one off my list. I LOVE email. It’s another form of procrastination for me that I pass off as work. But if I dive into my inbox then I don’t come out of it for at least another hour. Responding to emails, going through my favourite newsletters – it’s a time-suck.

Once I’ve completed some tasks on my to-do list, I can check my email. If I do it before then, more often than not, my entire work schedule goes off track.

3. Work on projects I’m passionate about. As a freelance writer, I have the luxury to choose projects I find interesting. It’s a luxury I take full advantage of. If I don’t work on projects I’m interested in, finishing them is agony.

Of course, that’s not to say I can’t be motivated to work on projects I don’t find interesting. For business reasons, when I need to take a project I’m not crazy about, I make sure I have another motivating factor to push me to do my best. And that’s money. Nothing like the thought of going to a resort for the weekend to motivate me to wrap up a project and give it my absolute best 

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Steve Scott

 

Develop Good Habits

Steve Scott is an author, blogger and speaker. He writes about self-help, personal development, habit change and online publishing. He currently writes for developgoodhabits.com as well as his own self-published books. His thoughts on habit change and self-improvement are simple and expressed in the tagline of his webpage, “Build a better life. One habit at a time.”

 

Focus on a single step.

Lengthy to do lists will often make you feel like burying your head in the sand and doing anything but the task you need to do.

The answer to this is to make a firm commitment to complete a single step of the task. When the task in front of you seems smaller it is easier to commit even if you feel lazy. Often the largest barrier to getting things done is getting started. Once you finish the single step of the larger task, you will often find that you actually want to keep going.

Review your goals.

If you want to achieve great things, having concrete goals is a must. Goals will provide direction and keep you on track.

But goals can do more than that. On those lazy days when you really don’t feel like working, you can review your goals. Remind yourself of what you want to achieve and why you want to achieve it. Looking at the big picture like this can help you overcome a bit of procrastination on those lazy days.

Make it routine.

Often people have “bad days” because they rely on motivation to get things done. The problem is that motivation is fleeting. When you make a task routine you go beyond motivation. You commit to doing an action regardless of how you feel. Lazy, depressed, super-busy: it doesn’t matter. You commit to doing that task regardless.

By making a task something that is done every day without fail, after a couple of months it becomes part of your life and you do not need motivation to get it done. As Nike says, you, “just do it”.

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Sonia Simone

 

Copyblogger

Sonia Simone is Founding Partner and Chief Content Officer at Copyblogger. Everything she does and everything she’s done has been focused on creating more remarkable relationships with customers. When you communicate intense respect, integrity and an attitude of service, you’re rewarded with business. Simple, but rarely easy.

 

I think the most important thing you can do when you’re feeling lazy is … realize that you don’t need motivation. As Stephen Guise coaches, practice saying: “I believe that I can act no matter how I feel.” If you’re waiting around to feel un-lazy, you may be waiting a long time.

You can also light a fire under your backside by scheduling a Skype call or a meeting with a colleague to take the next action on the task. When you need to have your piece done or you’re letting down someone you respect, that can be extremely motivating. And don’t underestimate the power of a timer. If the laziness monster is really bad, set it for five minutes. Or do what I do, and set it for 25 minutes — but promise yourself you can quit after five if you’re really miserable. You’ll probably find, as I do, that the dread of “not-doing-it” is much worse than the mild annoyance of actually doing it.

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Lauren Tharp

 

LittleZotz Writing

Lauren Tharp is a freelance writer who develops brands through blogging. After over a decade of writing as a “side job,” she started her own business – LittleZotz Writing – and made writing her sole source of income. She’s worked in the writing & marketing departments of a television mini-series, an online radio station, a designer headphone company, and countless small businesses around the world.

 

I actually wrote an entire post recently on what to do when you lose your motivation to blog; however, if I had to boil it down to just three tips, they would be: remember why you started and the goals you’re still striving for, remember your readers and how much they’d miss you if you stopped writing, and think of the money you’d lose out on if you quit just because you’re too in your own headspace to get properly motivated.

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Carol Tice

 

Make a Living Writing

Carol Tice is the founder of the blog Make A Living Writing, which has been in Writer’s Digest’s 101 Best Websites for Writers for multiple years. Carol is on a mission to help writers grow their income. She has created premium courses at Useful Writing Courses and a paid community at Freelance Writers Den, which was founded in 2011 and now has over 1,000 members. She has self-published twelve ebooks and counting, including Small Blog Big Income, and The Step by Step Guide to Freelance Writing Success. She has written or co-written two traditionally published print books-How They Started: How 25 Good Ideas Became Great Businesses, and The Pocket Small Business Owner’s Guide to Starting Your Business on a Shoestring. Her most recent articles were for Forbes Magazine and Delta Sky.

 

Honestly, I might feel lazy sometimes, but I rarely give in to the urge to just lay around. I’m in motion pretty much every waking moment. I lift weights or do yoga while I watch TV. I think of blog-post ideas while I walk the dog. But if you’re one of those people who sometimes feel unable to get off your duff and get rolling on your goals, here are 3 tips:

Break it down. We often go into paralysis mode when we feel overwhelmed by the tasks before us. If that’s you, break down your task into smaller bites. Perhaps today, you’ll just look up a few names of people you should contact and find their emails. That’s all. Tomorrow, maybe you email one of them. Any tiny step you can take today is better than putting it all off until tomorrow.

Do ANYTHING. If you find yourself unable to take action on important priorities, shift to something else. Write a grocery list. Clean a bathroom. Call a friend in need. Anything. Once you are in action, it’s easier to transition to tackling the difficult goal you’re avoiding.

Take a nap. I believe the #1 cause of ‘feeling lazy’ is lack of sleep. Stop trying to power through it and set a timer for 20 minutes. Close your eyes and take deep breaths, doze or simply relax. Allow yourself permission to do absolutely nothing, for this short time. Don’t think about your responsibilities. Even if you don’t fall asleep, you’ll be refreshed and reenergized, and more likely to feel up to tackling your to-dos.

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Joanna Wiebe

 

Copyhackers

Joanna Wiebe is a copywriter with 11 years’ experience as a full-time agency and in-house writer (for a major software company). She is the founder of the blog copyhackers.com, a resource for other writers. She is a self-motivated, highly-productive professional who listens well to clients, writes for end users, develops refreshing concepts & communications materials and balances grammar with style.

 

I can’t say I often feel lazy – so when I do, I:

  • Give my brain and body a few hours to chill and do nothing – dolce far niente,
  • Switch tasks, or
  • Take a shower or go for a run – I work from home so either is easy, and they always help me clear my head, focus on one thing and sort out how to do that one thing immediately when I get back to my desk.

Yuri Kruman

Master The Talk Career Success Consulting, 95 Eastern Parkway, Suite 3F, Brooklyn, NY, 11238

Yuri Kruman is a trusted career, business and life coach and professional strategist based in New York. As Member of the Forbes Career Council and CEO / Founder of Master The Talk Career Success Consulting, he has helped clients of all career stages, industries and job markets around the world (and all around the U.S.) to chart a clear path in their careers, building confidence and understanding along the way.

Since 2013, he’s shared his expertise and empowered people with the knowledge they need to find, compete for and win their dream jobs, revamping their résumé, acing that interview and negotiating for the title and salary they deserve. 

He has worked with and consulted for seemingly every sector of the professional world, from tech startups to multinational banks, pharmaceutical companies, law and academia—experience he now brings to help individuals set clear goals toward career advancement. 

Yuri has helped build venture-backed health tech startups (Maxwell Health, Liazon, Baby Doctor), consulted large banks and hedge funds (Goldman Sachs, Bank of America, Fortress Investment Group), as well as worked in law (various large law firms) and academia (NYU).

Yuri is likewise a well-published author and health tech entrepreneur. He's been featured on Inc., Fast Company, BBC, Time, PBS, Thought Catalog, Lifehack.org, WorkAwesome and CareerHeads. Yuri blogs on careers, consumer psychology, health and productivity at BlueprintToThrive.com. He has worked in healthcare, finance and law.

He has spoken at General Assembly, The Muse, the University of Pennsylvania and Columbia University, among others. 

Yuri has published two novels of fiction, poetry and various essays and op-eds. He lives with his wife and two children in New York.