8 Ways to Turn Your Guilt, Shame and Procrastination into Better Health, Finances and "Done."

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It was the best of times for productivity advice. It was the worst of times for productivity. Despite an endless stream of upbeat self-help books and articles, the great majority of us simply can't change our lives completely overnight. Gradual change is harder, but as always, necessary. There are no shortcuts, we are always told, but this is only partly true.

The algorithms that run our lives - from ingrained habits and routines to Google searches and our Facebook, Pinterest and LinkedIN feeds - have all been optimized and tinkered with by someone else. Remember when you had no email, Facebook or the news to check first thing when you woke up?

On top of the time wasted, there is always guilt and shame - and often awful stress - over procrastination, both at work and home. That's how decision-making and our productivity become so warped and clouded by reaction, not proactive thinking.

Before I got my act together in my twenties, I drifted for a good long while until the status quo became impossible to keep. I had to get my act together or risk losing what I had. The chaos had become impossible to manage. I started meditating everyday and taking better care of health, took pains to understand and learn to manage my finances. I broke the vicious cycle of perfectionism and disappointment over unfinished projects.

Here are the strategies I used to turn my negative emotions into high performance:

1) Lower the barriers to making decisions easily and gaining the habits to get things done. Each night, I would prepare my lunch and work clothes and the tools and conditions I needed for my mediation. This took away the need to make decisions in the morning, so I could get things done (eat better, meditate, get to work on time, etc.). This took the guilt and shame out of the equation.

2) Turn my guilt about letting others down into the habit of waking up early to meditate. I would be exhausted from the night before, but because I felt guilty about letting down the other guys in the synagogue that needed me to make 10 for morning services, I would drag myself up and go to pray with them each morning.

The fear of bad appearance meant maintaining an “expensive” look on a very limited budget. This turned into a Negotiation Mindset backed by budgeting, seeking better prices and negotiating big purchases. This forced me to overcome a fear of negotiation and led to multiple raises and better benefits at work, among many other financial and other rewards.

3) Make myself accountable to someone else (my wife, best friend, mother, etc.), using the shame of disappointment as a force for productivity. Before I met my wife, I was writing my first novel on and off for 5 years without much progress. When she told me, "finish or I'm out of here," it got done within a few months. My second novel was finished in 7 months because of a fellowship deadline.

4) Use my guilt about not eating well consistently (thanks, Mom!) or following through to create simple good habits for my diet. I set easy and clear conditions for myself. If I wanted to eat breakfast, first I'd have to pray/meditate. Then, in order to get to breakfast, I'd have to drink water first to start my digestion. Then, it turned into a glass of water before every meal and eventually other small, but critical changes for better digestion.

5) Channel my procrastination on Facebook and LinkedIN into set time windows during the day to read important industry trends and health, personal finance and productivity tips. Guilt over procrastination never diminished the amount of time I spent on social media. So, I filtered my news feeds to get rid of distracting, annoying and useless posts from "friends." I "liked" the FB and LinkedIN pages of publications and people and companies I actually wanted to read and left out all the rest. This way, when I would go in by habit, I would spend my time wisely and improve my life tangibly, even while “wasting time.”

6) Automate as many things as I can relating to good habits of health, personal finance and productivity. This meant leaving my phone in another room when having dinner with family and overnight, to get me awake and out of bed irreversibly. I automated 401(k) contributions to maximize the company match, my student loan payments (getting back a quarter point in interest charges) and monthly transfers into savings (Digit.co and my bank app), as well as credit card payments to take advantage of "you won't spend it if you don't see it," of credit card points and frequent flyer miles, cash back and other card perks.

I started using apps (Asana, Mint, Credit Karma) to check in each week to see my full professional and financial pictures. Most of all, I automated my Negotiation Mindset during purchases to save a lot of money and think more creatively about my partnerships with people and derive more benefit for family, my boss and others in my business and professional contexts.

7) Train my (quite rational) fear of appearing to be a hypocrite when criticizing others into making sure I was always (or as much as my flawed human nature allowed) on time, presentable and prepared, positive, on message, concise and in some way helpful to whomever I met. Since I hate it when people waste my time when they are late, unprepared, un-presentable, off-message, long-winded and unhelpful to me in any way, it made only perfect sense that I take care of all these things myself first.

8) Channel my laziness when it came to stopping to eat more healthy food during the week. Since I started being more religiously observant, I had to do a washing and prayer ritual before eating bread and then again after. Since I was too lazy to do this, I effectively eliminated bread from my diet during the week.

Now go and turn your fears into success! And if you're feeling really inspired, head on over here and here to learn how to start good habits and eliminate bad ones, once and for all. Start your journey up and forward today. Time's a wasting.

**And, as ever, if you have any questions at all, please do get in touch!**

Are there other proven strategies you’ve used to channel your negative emotions into better health, wealth and productivity? Please share them with the Community in Comments below. We’d love to hear from you!

– –

Like what you see? Visit BlueprintToThrive.com for more great strategies and tips for better health and wealth, plus improved productivity.

Follow us @Blueprint2Thriv

Yuri Kruman is a Healthcare Product Manager, published author and contributor to Money Magazine, blogger at BlueprintToThrive.com and health tech entrepreneur based in New York.

*The views expressed herein are his own*

 

New Parents' Guide to Finance

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5Z8QJ8SIHD Great news, congrats! You’re gonna be a parent soon! You must be thrilled (and likely worried out of your mind!)

Everyone gives advice, regardless of your wishes not to hear it. Here's how to make sure that the baby learns to sleep well! Here's how you save on diapers! There is this awesome trick I know to potty-train the baby - at 6 months!

So while your head is spinning from logistics (we need a bigger place, a nanny, grandma's coming in from Phoenix, time to tell my boss), you're likely to forget the basics - how to plan ahead and pay for Mini-Me.

While you may think that costs are always unexpected (which is partly true), the good news is that the two of you control the show.

Here are the keys to mastering your finances with your baby in tow:

 

1) Take common-sense (and not-so-common-sense) precautions to reduce financial risk for your family.

a. Take out a reasonably valued life insurance policy for each of you (parents) based on your lifestyle. You never know what can happen, but if it does, G-d forbid, at least the other spouse will not be left in a complete free-fall while raising a baby on his or her own.

b. Put aside a rainy day fund of 6-12 months of (your combined) salary. What if one of you gets fired or decides to quit a job?

c. Review and update (or create) your financial plan to understand your current spending and project increases in what you will need to spend with the baby around.

Budget appropriately for formula and other food, clothing, daycare/nanny, stroller(s), transportation, decreased income (due to time off for Mommy and/or Daddy). Don't be caught off-guard.

Project out the costs (lost income and/or benefits) of staying at home vs. returning to work, how long each of you can stay at home with the baby.

d. Take the opportunity to reviews your finances and taxes to maximize all advantages, whether by earning points from your credit card purchases, maximizing your employer's 401(k) or Roth IRA contributions, negotiating down fees and recurring expenses (phone, internet, cable).

Here is a previous post on **12 Steps to a Comprehensive Financial Strategy**.

Ramit Sethi also gives a great primer on optimizing your finances here.

e. Go into the birth with clear eyes about how you will pay for what and where the money will come from. Have a safety cushion and hedge your risk appropriately. Don't be caught off guard by "circumstances."

 

2) Adjust your tax status when filing taxes and make sure to take advantage of the extra exemptions, child tax credits and child care expenses through pre-tax FSA (flexible spending account) and HSA (health savings account) contributions.

Don't miss out on the major tax advantages of having a kid. Plan ahead for the extra expenses and do your best to take advantage of pre-tax contributions through available FSAs, HSAs.

 

3) Start a 529 plan for your kid.

College is insanely expensive and will only keep rising in cost, so start saving and investing for it ASAP. Start here before you sign up to understand growth expectations, budgeting and which expenses are included and which are not when it comes time for your kid to spend the money on college.

 

4) Adjust your health insurance coverage to cover your baby ASAP.

Purchase any additional types of insurance, as necessary, for you and/or your kid. Choose your plan based on your projected needs. Consider starting an HSA (health savings account) at work to put aside pre-tax money to pay for any projected medical expenses, as necessary.

 

5) Don't run to keep up with the Joneses (or Patels or Ivanovs). **Have your own ideas about what's important for your kid to have and what's not important.**

Discuss your parenting approach and the principles you will put to work when raising your baby.

Communicate constantly with each other and be open about any hangups or reservations you may have with the other person's approach! Hash it out and pick your battles. This process is especially critical if you come from different cultures/countries and types of family.

If you're just "winging it," you'll end up spending tons of money on material goods when experiences are much more valuable - both for baby and for you.

Ask your parents how they raised you, what toys and books you had. You'll always learn a lot when you dig into what worked for them (and didn't) when raising you. You will find that less is always more and simpler is always better.

 

6) Everything is always negotiable. NEVER pay retail (but go to high-end stores to get great ideas for what toys, clothing and other things you want to buy for your kiddo). Always ask for a discount. Worst case, they say no. You'd be surprised how often people are willing to bargain, even on basic goods.

Borrow from, barter and/or swap with friends or neighbors, if you can. This works well, especially if friends or neighbors are at a different stage of life with their kids and have toys, clothing, books or other things that they no longer need (or don't need for now, when you need it).

Comparison Shop. Always check prices on Amazon, Craigslist and E-Bay, as well as local Mommy groups and baby-themes swap events.

Just because you love your baby to pieces doesn't mean you should drop your common sense when shopping for clothing, toys, diapers, books or anything else. Don't lose your head and always think like a rational, intelligent adult!

A free or cheaper version is (almost) always available when you want to buy something expensive. Use IFTTT.com to set recipes to watch Craigslist for items you want (whether a fancy stroller, toy you really want for your kid, extra formula or anything else).

Always do your research about what others say about solving your particular problem ahead of time, especially before making big purchases.

Buy in bulk when you can - but avoid buying every item you need in bulk. Here's a good guide on what you should ad should NOT buy in bulk.

 

7) No difficult situation you encounter is a completely new situation.

Someone, somewhere (likely in your town or neighborhood) has been through it before and knows how to solve the problem better, cheaper and/or faster than you know. Read and do your research. Crowd-source. Ask your friends, neighbors and colleagues. You will be pleasantly surprised how often people are willing to help out materially or with useful advice from their experience to help you solve problems better, faster and/or cheaper.

 

8) Simpler is always better.

Babies don't appreciate when something is expensive. They DO appreciate (and play more at a time with) a toy or other object when it's truly interesting and engaging, which has no correlation with price. When you were growing up, you didn't have any electronic gadgets, a thousand teddy bears or other distractions. Odds are, especially if you grew up in a poor country, you had even less and still turned out just fine in terms of curiosity, intelligence and motivation:)

As you will see, a kid is often more engaged and joyful when playing with a simple box or step-stool, spoon and fork, basic building blocks and shapes, anything with many colors and sounds/words, rather than when playing with an iPad or electronic device.

Stop your kid and show him or her flowers, insects, trees, leaves, cars, people. TALK to your kids! Teach them as many words as possible. Don't flood them with toys, but with experiences they'll cherish for the rest of their lives.

Also, LISTEN to your kids and encourage them to tell you what they see and experience! This is far more valuable than outsourcing to a voice on a machine or even a nanny.

 

9) Start a baby registry ASAP.  Advertise widely among your family, friends and colleagues. Don't be shy - this can really help defray costs and help friends and family feel involved and invested.

 

10) Ask for help from family to cut down expenses from baby-sitting, clothing, etc., as needed. Consider swapping group baby sitting time with friends, neighbors and family.

 

11) Know your rights under the Family and Medical Leave Act (FMLA), listed here. Have a good Employment Law attorney ready if your employer gives you trouble about the FMLA or fires you despite your rights thereunder.

  • **Both mother and father** are entitled to FMLA leave for the birth of their child, or placement with the employee of a child for adoption or foster care.

 

12) Get help from a Certified Financial Planner (CFP), financial adviser and/or tax attorney to plan out the tax implications of having a baby, as well as for any questions about a will, setting beneficiaries, cash gifts to the baby and any other related foreseeable events.

It's worth the time and money now and better than scrambling later, because your house is not in order.

 

13) Invest in experiences more than in material goods.

Take great (real, long, engaging, truly restful) vacations. Your spouse and kid will appreciate it much more than more crap accumulating around the house.

Get a babysitter and go on dates! Keep investing time and efforts in your marriage. After all, isn't this why you married each other?

 

Now drop the worries, make a plan and talk to your spouse about your goals and strategies to raise your kid like you want. You'll be surprised about what you agree and disagree about. As parents ourselves, we'll be rooting for you!

**And , as always, if you have any questions at all, get in touch!**

Are there other important strategies you’ve used to get your finances in order for when baby comes? Please share them with the Community in Comments below. We’d love to hear from you!

– –

Like what you see? Visit BlueprintToThrive.com for more great strategies and tips for better health and wealth, plus improved productivity.

Follow us @Blueprint2Thriv

Yuri Kruman is a Healthcare Product Manager, published author, blogger at BlueprintToThrive.com and health tech entrepreneur based in New York.

*The views expressed herein are his own*

12 Steps to a Comprehensive Financial Strategy

KQWMZQ7W1C (**Disclaimer**: nothing in this post should be construed as financial or legal advice or endorsement of any financial or other product or company. Consult a certified financial adviser or planner for professional advice. Regardless, you should always do your research and avoid biased sources. All opinions herein are solely my own.)

The trouble with financial advice is that it comes from all over the place - your parents, your siblings, your friends, your bank, your landlord, your super, ten different apps, you name it. How do you know whom to trust?

First of all, don't (readily) trust those people who 1) don't know your full financial picture and/or who 2) are motivated by profit from you, not your true financial well-being. That would mean developing skepticism at what's offered by almost every financial institution you deal with, including banks, financial advisers, mutual funds, etc. They all generally profit through fees, regardless of whether your money grows or shrinks while in their hands.

Ok, but who's left to trust, then? Trust those people who have their finances together and have applied the appropriate strategy for them and their family to effectively protect against risk in a world of complex financial instruments, wild market swings, rising expenses and uncertainty.

That would mean educating yourself about what works best for someone in your particular situation, reading the work of people who are not selling you specific products, but a strategy that makes sense for you, given your current financial circumstances.

The key to creating a comprehensive and well-calibrated financial strategy is A) diagnosing the full picture, 2) appropriately gauging the risk of certain events relevant to your age, family situation, standard of living and 3) counteracting that set of risks by covering yourself with the appropriate types of insurance, reserves and creating a plan of action in case of certain emergency scenarios.

Without further ado, here's how it's done:

A) Open your eyes. Get your head out of the sand. Money is a painful and difficult subject for most people. 

BUT, know that worrying about money kills your health and far too many marriages and relationships. Let it sink in that you can't "just get by."

Stop avoiding the subject. Bite the bullet. Start with baby steps.

Go to Mint.com (or another, similar money management tool that you can use easily and often) and set up an account, if you haven't already. Set up all your bank accounts to feed information to Mint. Set up all your student loans, credit cards and other debt to feed information there.

Don't become obsessed with your Net Worth figure. It can be dispiriting or illusionary, depending on whether it looks good or bad to you.

Once you have a clear picture of your assets and your liabilities, you can move on to crafting a strategy that makes sense for you. This includes doing careful research (avoiding biased sources) and asking for advice and help from professionals that have no stake in selling you certain products and just want to help you create a sustainable, well-calibrated plan.

Map out your monthly cash flows (ex: $10K salary in, $3K for rent, utilities and internet, $2K for student loan payments, $1K groceries and restaurants, $500 entertainment, $1000 credit card bill, $2500 to savings, etc.) Now you have what you need to start budgeting in order to reach your goals. Diagram how much exactly you take in, from where and at what time in the month / year, as well as what bills you pay and when and how much money you spend on specific categories. Software like Mint will help you categorize your purchases and other spending more carefully and consistently.

B) Start Saving and Investing ASAP, if you haven't started already. Timing is everything if you want your money to grow and work for you. The earlier you start, the more your money will accrue in a shorter time. 

For example, starting to save and invest at 22 for 10 years will earn you more interest than if you start at 32 and invest for 30 years. Let that sink in. Timing is everything. Start ASAP.

C) Create a list of goals for the next year, 2 years, 3, 5 and 10, as well as 20-30 down the road, for retirement. Do you plan to save for a long-awaited vacation? Are you planning to get married in 2 years? Do you want to buy a house in 5 and need 20% down payment? Do you want to send your kids to college in 15 years? Do you want to retire at 55 and travel around the world?

**Write down your goals** and place them in a visible place (fridge / work desk, etc.) It helps to remind yourself what you're working for on a daily basis.

Be as specific as possible with your goals - as in, here is exactly how much I need to save (ex: for my wedding by March of next year (6 months left)). Only when you set specific amounts and time frames will the goal become concrete and will it be easier to automate saving and put it out of mind (and stop worrying).

D) Create a monthly budget that takes into account all your incoming cash and outgoing bill payments and spending.

Be as specific and accurate as possible with categorizing your spending and amounts. It may take a bit of time to perfect this, but start ASAP.

The idea here is NOT to automatically cut down on everything you spend, but at least to see where you can save real money (ex: by buying in bulk, taking your own lunch to work, shifting how much you spend on going out to saving for your dream vacation, etc.)

Optimize your purchases by always 1) price comparing online and 2) finding ways to get what you need for free or less on Craigslist or otherwise on forums, Moms' groups, Facebook groups, church groups, among your friends, etc. There is always a ton of stuff that people want to get rid of because they've grown out of it, it doesn't fit their interior design criteria, they're moving or just getting rid of stuff. Oh yeah, and ALWAYS NEGOTIATE (see item G below).

E) Reduce the number of decisions about money you have to take each month - AUTOMATE! 

For example, set your salary to put the minimum amount into your company's 401(k) plan each month to get the maximum matching amount (FREE MONEY!). Set your checking account to transfer 5% of each paycheck to savings. Open a Roth IRA and automate your contribution from checking each month. If you have kids, open a 529 plan for them and contribute each month.

F) Hedge against the risks most relevant to you.

For example, if you have a family and/or kids, buy life insurance. Consider Identity Theft Protection (a common affliction these days). If you have a medical history of cancer, consider cancer insurance. Look into Short-Term and Long-Term Disability (many employers pay for or subsidize this). If you have a pet, look into pet insurance (yet, that exists).

Look into putting some money into an FSA (flexible spending account) or HSA (health savings account) if you know you'll need the money (tax-free) to pay for things like day care, your commute or expected health expenses throughout the year.

G) Always Negotiate (because everything is always negotiable)! Negotiate on major and minor purchases. Know the best times to make major purchases throughout the year. Negotiate on monthly expenses like car insurance, credit card rates, cell phones and other things by presenting competitor pricing and your leverage as a long-time customer (here's a great run-down of techniques that work for this). Always negotiate to have fees taken off your bill.

H) Monitor Your Credit Regularly to Check for Mistakes and Fraud. My recommendation for a free (yet robust) credit monitoring app is CreditKarma.com. Use it!

I) Pay off your Highest-Interest Debt First, before investing a lot of money (other than 401(k) free money, that is). 

For example, if you have student debt at 8.5% (or credit card debt at 29%), it would take a rather phenomenal (a.k.a. impossible) return on investment before you would be able to beat the interest collecting on your student loans. Use either the Snowball Method or Avalanche Method (here's a good primer on both). Either way, find a way to pay as much as possible per month to eliminate the debt ASAP and to save on interest payments.

Negotiate with your credit card provider to lower your rate or to pay off a lower balance up front. They can be quite flexible sometimes.

Look into refinancing your student debt, but beware losing any deferment/forbearance benefits you may have accrued.

J) Create at least a 6-12 month cushion in savings to maintain your lifestyle at a similar level in case of job loss or major financial loss elsewhere.

K) Once you have your credit card and student (and/or personal) debt on a plan to be repaid ASAP, then consider investing your money in low-fee financial instruments, such as ETFs and index funds. Reduce (or eliminate) the fees you pay a financial adviser by considering using a robo-adviser like Hedgeable, Wealthfront or Betterment. Your involvement should depend on what you can reasonable. Your level of risk should depend on both your financial goals, age and risk appetite, as well as how easily you are willing to part with the money, given your overall financial picture.

L) EARN MORE MONEY! 

Negotiate a raise, bonus or other extra perks / compensation using these excellent techniques from Ramit Sethi (trust me, they work).

Do you know a foreign language or two? Translate.

Do you write well? Do copywriting.

Do you freelance as a house painter, baby or dog sitter, consult startups on product strategy, love making jewelry or have another awesome hobby? Offer your services to people you know and online to companies and people willing to pay you for your talents. Then raise your rates.

Perhaps you should even start a business, if you're meeting demand that you know exists for your product and/or knowledge.

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Are there other important strategies you’ve used to get your finances in order and thriving? Please share them with the Community in Comments below. We’d love to hear from you!

– –

Like what you see? Visit BlueprintToThrive.com for more great strategies and tips for better health and wealth, plus improved productivity.

Follow us @Blueprint2Thriv

Yuri Kruman is a Healthcare Product Manager, published author, blogger at BlueprintToThrive.com and health tech entrepreneur based in New York.

*The views expressed herein are his own*

 

How To Build Sustainable Health and Well-being

 SW_Kristen Bruley

"How do you manage through the stress of living in New York, a family, huge student debt, a full-time job, plus writing and the other stuff you do?"

Well, that's a question for the ages. It's mostly been through trial and error, big mistakes, consistent tweaking, finding Moses, having to live through great upheaval, moving 20 times, rebirth, being born with sensitive digestion and high sensitivity. Nothing's been easy, but hard work's paid off.

I haven't let my "circumstances" break me, simply. But also, it's through discipline and patience. Rome wasn't built in a day. Along the way, I've learned a lot about how to maintain my health - both physical and mental - and what is most important to the process.

**Here is the A-Z of what I've done to get to where I am today**:

A) Eat a consistently balanced diet.

Accustom your digestive system to wholesome foods and make it a habit (with variations to keep things interesting). Experiment, but have a solid backbone of a regimen.

Eat a bigger breakfast, light lunch and light dinner before 7 PM. Don't eat too much sugar. Avoid refined foods, preservatives and complex-sounding ingredients.

Eat a wide variety of foods. Get your vitamins and minerals through food, not supplements.

Keep your portions small by using smaller plates. Make your own food at home to control nutrition and costs.

Focus on maintaining a healthy digestive system. Don't push it to the edge too often or you will end up (permanently) sick or worse.The goal is to limit inflammation and oxidation. Therefore, watch how much spicy and acidic food you eat (and never late at night), how much dairy you consume (the less, the better).

Consumer adequate fiber and B vitamins from whole grains and green vegetables. Make salads often. Eat little or no red meat (poultry is better) and lots of fish (better to freeze before cooking, to kill sea words and other parasites). Eat olive oil and drink red wine periodically. Fruits and veggies.

Eat yogurt and drink kefir to maintain thriving gut bacteria (a key to the whole process of digestion).

B) Hydrate throughout the day (but don't drink too much water, either).Sip lukewarm water with honey and lemon several times a day. Drink water before meals (ideally, 15-30 minutes before) and 30+ minutes after (but never DURING the meal).

C) Move! Walking even twice a day and getting up to stretch every hour does marvels for your health (more than going to the gym before or after work!)

D) Learn to relieve stress safely and effectively, every single day.Here's a good primer on how to do this well.

Take regular breaks. Switch things up (go out after work, meet friends, create new experiences).

Sleep well (7-8 hours a night), most importantly. Block out as much sound and light as you can from your bedroom (use blackout shades, turn off appliances in the background, etc.). Keep all your devices far away from you while you sleep. Pay careful attention to your circadian rhythms and don't mess with them!

Maintain good dental hygiene twice a day - floss, mouthwash, brush thoroughly, use a tongue scraper. When your mouth is inflamed or bleeding, it's often a sign of bigger health problems.

Learn to plan and prepare ahead of important meetings, at work and at home. Prep meals for the next day ahead of time before you sleep. Prepare the clothes and shoes you'll wear, plus whatever else you need in your bag for tomorrow.

Reduce the number of decisions you have to make in the morning (and in general, every day).

Resolve all the conflicts with people that you can before going to sleep. Take vacations!

E) Know who you are and where you're going in life. Here's How to Find Out What You Are Really Meant to Do in Life. Now march to the beat of your own drummer.

F) Meditate daily and weekly (observe your own personal Sabbath, especially from everything digital).

Know where you came from and where you're going. Who are you, in the grand scheme of things? What is the meaning of life for you? What are your mission and purpose?

Keep up a weekly (ideally, daily) check-in with yourself about your progress on the spiritual front.

Learn from every man and woman you meet, whether what to do or NOT to do. Take classes to learn the wisdom and coping/survival/thriving strategies of other traditions outside your own.

Know that there is a reason for everything you go through, everything that happens to you and everyone else. You may not know the reasons now, but you'll see them later.

All setbacks are growth opportunities. Don't waste them in self-pity. Move on and learn the lessons quickly.

G) Know that every problem you have or will ever have has been faced by many other people, including family, friends and acquaintances (and people posting online).

Seek out their wisdom and use it. Don't reinvent the wheel. Read Quora. Read forums, interest groups, crowdsource solutions from your networks. Ask for advice - you may even get a job out of it!

H) Turn off and/or put away your devices at set times.Put the smartphone away at dinner and before you sleep. Keep it away from your bedside. Don't check your phone first thing in the morning. Wait at least an hour. Read something interesting (magazine, book) on the pot, instead.

I) Surround yourself with family and friends good people who want you to succeed and be healthy.Distance yourself from negative people and their energy-sucking antics.

J) Value your time above all other resources.Are you doing something that's helping you grow as a person, professional or artist? Are you spending time with people that will help you move along the right path, with your best interest in mind? If not, move on quickly.

Maintain high standards for the things that you consume and produce (what you eat and how you digest, what you hear and how you speak, what you watch and what you show others).

K) Work hard to understand what thoughts/scripts (things you always tell yourself) hold you back and change them.

Here's a primer on how to acknowledge them and then start changing them.

L) Learn to say no to people and things that waste your time.Repeat often. Now your "Yes" is really worth something to you and others.

M) Break free of allergens making your life miserable. Do an elimination diet (eliminate candidate foods and ingredients that you might be allergic to). Clean the house regularly and your desk at work, too.

N) Set a home cleaning regimen.Get a cleaning lady, if you can't manage on your own. Cleanliness of the house reflects cleanliness of the mind.

O) Set up your finances.

This is the single biggest source of stress and illness for most people. Learn to budget and optimize cash flows and investments effectively. Diversify your sources of income. Read up on personal finance (for example, Ramit Sethi's The Ultimate Guide to Making Money).

Optimize your spending patterns - always negotiate and look for better prices. Buy fewer things, but of higher quality (that will last longer).

Create financial goals and plan out how to reach them. Consult a financial planner. Pay off your highest-percentage debt first. Carefully monitor your credit and improve it in every way you can. Have at least a 6-month cushion in savings that's readily accessibly in emergencies.

Invest in low-fee financial instruments like ETFs and index funds to maximize returns.

Put the minimal amount in your 401(k) to get your employer match, but not a penny more. 401(k) programs are lucrative for employers and the mutual funds that manage the money, but not very much so for you and I.

P) Keep a journal. Keep a pen and notepad by your bedside, at work and in your bag. It's critical to look back and reflect on what you've been through and how you've grown since then.

Q) Write down 10 ideas for something new each day. Make it a habit. Thank James Altucher. And read his stuff every day. Trust me, it's great.

R) Organize all your information in a way that you can find and access it easily at any time.

Always be organizing. Organize your work files, email, notes, music, etc. This reduces stress when you need something right away (and that's several times a day). Take notes in one place (if on a computer, then in a WORD file - one per subject). Otherwise, take notes on a note pad with a pen. Ideally, your notes are easily and quickly searchable (computer is easier). Use Evernote.

S) Always be reading!Read constantly, always be learning and asking questions and helping others with your knowledge.

T) Use (almost) every minute of your free time for something useful (outside of rest time set aside) to read, write, reflect, learn and plan ahead. It's also perfectly ok to be bored and do nothing, sometimes. It helps calm the nerves and reset. But being bored all the time is a waste. The world is too interesting and needs you too much to do something useful. Oh yeah, get rid of that TV, while you're at it.

U) Know your boundaries and push beyond them constantly.Never rest on your laurels. Take risks (better, calculated risks). Again, don't waste any opportunities for growth.

V) Automate and outsource what others can do better, faster and/or cheaper than you to save time. Here's a great resource that can help - Ari Meisel's Less Doing blog.

W) Say thank you as much as you can, especially to family and friends.Express your gratitude in person and in writing. If you believe in G-d, then say thanks for the food you eat, for keeping your organism whole and functioning properly, for good things that happen in your life, for giving you sustenance and all the other blessings you have in life.

Leave no person worse off for having met you - and do your best to leave them better off for it. How can you help? Ask!

X) Kill all your Sacred Cows. You'll thank me later.

Y) Focus. Nothing great in life was ever accomplished without at least some measure of sustained focus. I have ADD as much, if not worse, than the next guy. But when I'm focused and in my element (despite all the insane distractions in life), that's where I'm at my best.

Z) Find your purpose and mission in life and execute on them.The only thing that matters is your performance against your potential, not how you compare against anyone else. NEVER compare yourself to anyone else. You have a unique mission and purpose and nobody else's should matter to you for comparison.

Lastly, know that all is One. Everything in life has a meaning. Also, keep in mind that each of us came from dust and will go back to dust when finished in this life, which is but a blink in the continuum of the universe.

In light of that. do your best with what you were given in life and the good things will follow.

I wish you only the best of luck in your journey. If I can ever be of help, please do get in touch!

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Are there other methods you've used to achieve sustainable health and wellbeing? Please share them with the Community in Comments below. We’d love to hear from you!

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Yuri Kruman is a Healthcare Product Manager, published author, blogger at BlueprintToThrive.com and health tech entrepreneur based in New York.

*The views expressed herein are his own*

Sit-It-Out Syndrome: Why Women Are Afraid to Invest

Very important points about women's relative reluctance to invest their hard-earned cash and why to do about changing attitudes: http://www.learnvest.com/2013/10/the-sit-it-out-syndrome-why-women-are-afraid-to-invest-their-hard-earned-cash/?utm_source=email&utm_medium=internal&utm_campaign=Monday%20One%20Daily%202013-10-14